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Full text of "Breeder and Sportsman (1900)"

Accessions No, 114-1 o4 Received 

! Class 



Vol. XXXVI. No. L 

No. 22}^ GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1900, 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR. 



Nutwood Leads Them All. * 



This great son of Belmont 64 and Miss Russell (the 
dam of Maud S. 2:08% and others) by Pilot Jr. bids 
fair to by another year lead all sires in America as a 
producer of speed. He now has 157 2:30 performers, 
being but two behind Electioneer, and there are several 
of Nutwood's progeny that have never started but will 



Nutwood we find Manager 2:06% the fastest with Lock- 
heart 2:08}.< a trotter next in point of speed These 
are the only ones with records better than 2:10 out of 
the entire list of thirteen But among the thirty one 
2:15 performers out of Nutwood mares are Arion 2 :07%, 
Fred Kohl 2:07%, Ethel Downs 2:10, Eyelet 2:06)^, 
Bellwood A 2:07% and Sunland Belle 2:08%. 

Nutwood was appreciated when he was in California, 
by but a few, but there are a number ot-AWsH^bred 
mares by him still alive in this St^e^a^ft-Wei^^iipt 



so many stallions carrying the blood of this truly great 
horse. 'In commenting on Nutwood's showing as a 
broodmare sire the Horse Review says: 

"When we then find that in all broodmare history 
only fourteen sires have got in all the dams of as many 
as ten 2 :15 performers, the exhibit of the Nutwood 
mares becomes amazing In calling attention to these 
facts it should be remembered that the son of Belmont 
and Miss Russell lived a long life got a very large num- 
ber of foals, and always — excepting during his career in 




114154 



NUTWOOD 600. 



be in training this year and for several years to come. 
It is the showing that Nutwood is making as a brood- 
mare sire that is attracting wide attention just now. In 
the Chicago Horse Review's table of sires of mares that 
have produced 2:15 performers, Nutwood's daughters 
are way in the lead with thirty-one, truly a marvelous 
showing. This is seven more than the daughters of any 
other sires have produced, and more wonderful still 
they have produced seven new 2 :15 performers in 1899. 
Looking over the list of 2:15 performers sired by 



should see to it that they are mated every year with the 
very choicest stallions to be reached. 

The picture presented of Nutwood on this page is an 
excellent likeness of the horse made in 1899 and has 
been pronounced by all who saw the horse in his life- 
time a perfect one, and is always recognized on sight. 
It is f om a large portrait by the well known artist Cecil 
Palmer, which hangs in the office of the Breeder and 
Sportsman, one of the most valued of its collection. 
California is very fortunate in having within her borders 



California — had access to a very select harem. But the 
fact also should he remembered that he is so recently 
dead that his youngest female foals are themselves still 
fillies, and that many of his daughters are not the dams 
of foals old enough for their first public appearance.'' 

"The glories of the Star mares, the Clays the Pilots, 
the Mambrino l'atchens, the Blue Bulls — all granted 
and given each their due credit, it still looms up a prob- 
ability that as a progenitor of broodmares Nutwood is 
the greatest of them all." 



2 



[January 6, 1900 



$10,000 For a Three Year Old. 



Sacramento Correspondence. 



Horaes Bred for Bone. 



A three year old boo of Direct 2:054 was sold two weeks 
ago for $10,000. The Meat man Ed Geers received the 
check which paid for the colt, and it was signed by C. J. and 
Harry Hamlin, proprietors of the Village Farm. The colt's 
name is Direct Hal and he is by Direct, out of Bessie Hal by 
Tom Hal. Ten thousand dollars is an unprecedented price 
to pay for a green three year old pacer, but Messrs. Hamlin 
knew what they were buying and doubtless believe they will 
make a profit on the youngster even at this price. The same 
week this sale was made T. E Keating, of Pleasanton, offered 
Mr. ('has. Griffith $5000 for another three year old son of 
Direct, this one out of Bon Bon by Simmons. Mr. Griffith 
refused the offer promptly, as he is firmly of the opinion that 
he has one of the beat three year olds in America, and that 
he will earn with him many times more than the sum offered. 
The fact that such prices as these are offered and paid for 
three year olds by Direct is conclusive evidence that the 
produce of this great little horse are sought after. And it by 
should they not be? Direct himself was a great three year 
old and despite the tremendous weight carried to make him 
trot showed great speed and won races in a game and bull 
dog manner. Shifted to the lateral wav of going he aston- 
ished the world, and defeating the mighty Hal Pointer in 
2:09, 2:08 and 2:08|, the record for three heats at that time, 
compelled the Tennessee breeders to acknowledge him "the 
greatest little horse in the world." Direct was timed a 
quarter in 274 seconds, almost a running horse gait, and for 
his size is the fastest pacer ever seen in America. But it 
was not only in races that his greatness was shown. Placed 
in the slud he sired Directly, the only two year old that ever 
paced a mile in 2:07}, and perhaps the only one that ever 
will. Directly reduced this mark to 2:03} in 1893, arid has 
been one of the great race horses among the free for all side 
wheelers. Direct also gjt Directum Kelly 2:08}, a trotler 
that went through the Grand Circuit of 1898 without a de- 
feat. He Bired Ed B. Young 2:11}, Miss Margaret 2:11^ 
Miss Beatrice 2:13}, 1 Direct 2:13, Arthur L. 2:15 and four- 
teen or fifteen others with records better than 2:30 and all 
race records at that. 

Direct was great as a race horse, and is great as a sire of 
race hordes, and besides being one of the best formed horses 
ever booked to a Bulky, his breeding is such that a great deal 
of his greatness is inherited and it is certain that he possesses 
the prepotency to reproduce it. 



Director 1987... 



f Dictator 113. 
I 



I Dolly.. 



Echora 2:23.. 



f Echo 462 

■< 
I 

(.Young Mare. 



i Hambletonian 10 

( Clara by American Star 

SMambrino Chief 11 
Fanny by Ben Franklin 



l Hambletonian 10 
( Fanny Felter 



r Jack Hawkins 
( By Son ot Ky. Whip 

His sire was that great race horse Director 2:17, who went 
through the East beating the cracks of his day in the same 
triumphant way his son did. Director not only sired Direct 
but he sired Directum 2:05}, the greatest trotting stallion 
that ever lived, and forty others with race records below 
2:30, beside the dams of John A. McKerron 2:12}, 
Little Thorne 2:09}, Oro Wilkes 2:11 and others. 
Director's sire was Dictator, the sire of Jay Eye 8ee 
2:06}, Impetuous 2:13, Phallas 2:13} and 58 others in 2:30, 
besides the dams of Nancy Hanks 2:04 and Lockheart 2:081, 
and is ranked as one of the greatest of sires. Dictator's sire 
was the Hero of Chester, Hambletonian 10, whose name is 
1 1 tlicieni and whose pedigree does not need tabulation or his 
ii cord in the etud commented upon. 

The dam of Director 2:17, was Dolly by Mambrino Chief, 
and she was also the dam of the great Onward 2:25}, sire of 
144 standard performers and still living, Czarina 2:21, Thorn- 
dale 2:22}, sire of ten in ibe list, and others. 

The dam of Dictator was Clara, the dam of the famous 
Dexter 2:17}, by American 8tar, and two others with records 
better than 2:30. 

Direct'e dam was Echora 2:231, by Echo, one of the best 
bred eons of HambletoniaD 10. Echo sired Bob Mason, the 
sire of Waldo J. 2:08, Pasha, sire of the dam of Toggles 
2:09} and the dams of Direct 2:051, Rex Alto 2:07}, Lo-ipe 
2:09}, Bay wood 2:101 and Dave Ryan 2:13. 

The next dam of Direct was the Young mare by the thor- 
oughbred horse Jack Hawkins, who sired ihe dams of Balkan 
2:15 and many other fast trotters. 

Bristling as it does with the names of great race horses, 
great sires and great broodmares, is it any wonder that the 
pedigree of Direct should attract Ihe attention of breeders? 
We understand that Oakwood Park 8tock Farm will this 
this year send at least ten of its choicest young matrons to 
Direct, and there is no doubt but bis book will be full early 
in the season. The get of no other stallion on this Coast are 
bringing such prices as the young Directs are this year and 
they must be a choice lot or the hard cash would not bj paid 
over for them. 

C. T. Hancock, the well known Dubuque, la., horseman, 
says there will be no meeting in the country that will eclipne 
the Dubuque meeting; that the purses will be good, and 
that they will open their entries early. Mr. Hancock is one 
of the best race association men in the country. 



Sacramento, Jan. 2, 1900. 
Editor Breeder and Sportsman: The new year 
opened here with a rainstorm that at this writing has devel- 
oped into a downpour that has caused a big rise in the river 
and made mud the rule on all the uopaved streets and 
highways. 

The first foal of the year at Rancho del Paso came on New 
Years day and is a fine colt by Spunwell. 

A. Robs has a couple of two year old', two three year 
olde, and a five year old, all maidens, which bee pects to 
take to Ingleside this week. 

Ab Stemler has Lodestar and Arbaces, and several two 
year olds,- but is not doing much with them, probably owing 
to the weather. 

Among the harness horses at the track I noticed Dr. Mc- 
Collum's pacer Dave Ryan 2:13 the other day and he is 
looking in splendid shape. They expect him to certainly 
lower his record this year and be will be campaigned in Cal- 
ifornia. Mary Rose is the name given by the Doctor to a 
very promising yearling filly by Dave Ryan out of Rosa Lee 
by Bob Lee, that is entered in the Occident Stakes. A two 
year old filly by Algona out cf Rosa Lee is expected to be a 
winner sure. 

Mrs. E. W. Callendine's great broodmare Abbie Woodnut, 
is heavy with foal to Nutwood Wilkes and the produce is 
expected to be a world beater, as the old mare never threw 
anythiog but a fast one. Mrs. Callendine has also Lady 
Keating, two years old, and first premium winner at the 
8tate Fair. She is out of Abbie Woodnut, and is by 8tam 
B. 2:11} and will give an account cf herself in the Stanford 
and Occident Slakes, in both of which she is entered. Ab- 
dine 2:17} by Wilkesdale is another of Abbie Woodcut's 
produce. Before the rain came on and when the track was 
good he was driven a quarter to a cart here in a shade better 
than 30 seconds, and they ear he can just fly whenever given 
his head. Tbey are conservative and predict a mark of 2:12 
for him this year. 

Mr. E. B. Smith's mare Swift Bird that took a three year 
old record of 2:291., is io foal to Stam B. 2:11 }, and as she 
was much faster than her record and is by Waldstein, Mr. 
Smith has a right to epxect something good. He also has 
Mollie Nurse 2:141, by Monwocd, and will campaign her on 
the California circuit in 1900. 

Hi Hogoboom, who has proven himself a good reineman 
Ob nearly every race track in California, as well as many 
over East, has a bunch of five that are green, but he says are 
four aces and a king. Four of them are by Waidstein and 
one by Diablo. But he is on a "deal" for another that he 
will open the boys eyes with if be gets him. Mr. Hrgobocm 
wants me to call your attention to the emission of one cf 
Waldstein's new performers from your 2:30 list. It is Cali- 
fornia Maid, a Humboldt county mare. Waldstein now has 
nine in the list. He will again make the season in Hum- 
boldt county and will have a large number of mares. 

Vet Tryon has the biggest string at the track, some very 
fast ones among them. Daedalion 2:11, by Diablo out the 
great broodmare Grace, by Buccaneer is looking well since 
his successful campaign last year. 

One of the greatest prospects in this part of the country is 
a four year old green pacer in Mr. Tryon's string that is 
called Belle Burgess. She is by Sterling out of a mare by St. 
Clair. She belongs to one of our prosperous dairymen and 
for good looks, good gait and speed, cannot be beaten by 
many in California. 

Hiio del Diablo 2:11}, is in this string, also a four year 
old pacer by Diablo out of a Nephew mare, a three year old 
by Tom Benton, Silver Buck, a three year old by Si'ver Bow 
out of Grace by Buccaneer that is entered in the Occident 
Stake, Prince Wilkes 2:30 by Clarence Wilses, dam by Dexter 
Prir.ce, Easter Wilkes a three year eld by Prompter, a green 
one by old Alex Button that attracts much attention from 
the horsemen every time he is out, and a trotter called 
Advah, by Advertiser, out of a Nutwocd mare. It will be 
seen that Mr. Tryon has quite a formidable string and amorg 
the green ones are several that are bound to get to the front 
this year even though the time be fast. More anon, 
_ Dan C. 

A Qocd Son of Guy Wilkes. 



When Milo Knox of Haywards leaves the latter part o^ 
this month for Chicago with a carload of horses consigned 
to the Splac-NewgaEs sale, in the car will be a three year 
old son of Guy Wilkes that is not only a handsome, well 
bred fellow, but a colt that will certainly make a fast trotter 
if given the training. As a two year old last fall he trotted 
a quarter barefooted in 341 seconds over the Alameda track 
which is evidence that he has plenty of speed. Being by 
Guy Wilkes he is certainly well enough bred on his sire's 
side for anybody. His dam is Glen Ellen, a very stoutly 
bred mare by Artburton the sire of San Mateo Stock Farm's 
best broodmares. Glen Ellen produced Verona Wilkes 2:27, 
and is out of Smoolhbriar (full sister to 8weetbriar 2:26}), 
by Eugene Caeserly, son of Gen. Tavlor, next dam Peanuts 
by the Morse Horse 6. This is the stoutest of breeding, the 
kind that finds no road too long, and as this colt is a very 
handsome individual he should be one of the hi.h priced 
ones at the sale. Whoever gets him will get a good one, and 
if trained he will certainly earn a low record. 



An English horse breeder, writing on breeding, says: When 
considering a horse's points, no practical man will begin to 
judge from the top. It is true that a horse with a taking 
head and general appearance is certain to attract anyone, 
but if u(nn the examination of his feet and legs it is seen 
thtt he has not sufficient bone to carry him, however good 
his other points are, he is useless, not only for carrying 
weight, but for standing much bard work of any sort. This 
principle applies to all classes of horses alike. The draft- 
horse requires sound, strong "underpinning" to carry his 
massive body and successfully move heavy loads. The 
massive leg, however, is not always indicative of the strength 
of bone. We must learn to judge of bone by appearance and 
feel. 

Commonly we hear of "flit bone" in a horse's leg, but 
there is no such thing in anv breed. The bones firming the 
leg of a horse have, when sawed through, an elliptical section 
slightly fl.ttened in front, with the smallest diameter behind. 
The contour of the bone is much more cylindrical than flat, 
and this applies to draft as we'l as racing or trotting horses. 
"Flat bone" is then a misnomer, but ''flu" as applied to the 
appearance of the leg is correct and the desirable shape in all 
horses. A round appearing leg on a horse does not indicate 
round bone, but a meaty condition, a coarseness of tissues, 
and, more than all, a lack of development and cleanness of 
the back tendons. In coarse bred, meaty legged horses of 
phlegmatic temperament and sluggish disposition, the bone 
of the legs is not of the close, ivory-like texture of the 
thoroughbred, but has a larger proportion of cancellated 
(spongy) tissue in its center, and hence is considered weaker 
than the bone of finer quality. 

The appearance of a round, meaty leg does not so much 
bespeak inherent lark of strength as it does undesirable 
attributes that generally accompany this type, such as 
grease, lymphangitis and other diseases of the phlegmatic 
horse. Breed for the flat appearing leg, for the reason that 
the bones of such horses are "flinty" in quality, hard as gun 
metal, and accompanied by well developed, plainly seen 
tendons, and in draft horses by a fringe of long, silky hair 
spricging from the back portion of the leg; whereas, in 
coarse bred, sluggish horses the "feather," so called, is 
likely to slick cut all around the leg, and in quality i 9 
about as silky as the stuffiog of an old-fashioned sofa. 

Chrose the breeding horse that has big, sound joints and 
well developed, fiat legs that properly bear his weight. 
See (hat he shows the soles of his shoes plainly as he trots 
away, and it nay be taken for granted that his tempera- 
ment is desirable. The big, flabby, "overtopped" horse is 
a poor type to breed. 'He has not Ike necessary quality and 
strength of bone to carry his body or stand hard work, and 
it is usual to find such an animal "throwing out" splints, 
spavins, ringbones, sidebones and curbs. Such blemishes 
constitute unsoundness, and seem to be nature's way of 
branding a horse according to his character, as if to say the 
unsoundness Been is a sure evidence of an unseen source of 
unsoundness which is hereditary. 



The European Handicap System. 



An American horseman who has spent some time in Eng 
land contributes an interesting article on harness racing in 
that country to the last number of the Trotter and Pacer, in 
the course of which he has the following to say regarding 
handicapping as applied to harness races. He says: "I notice 
in American turf journals occasionally articles advocating 
associations to try the European system of handicapping 
trotters. I am sure no one who has seen much of the handi- 
cap trotting would ever urge its adoption in the States. It is 
a fact that this system is the chief obstacle in Ihe way of 
harness racing on this side of the water, and the harness 
race horse will never rise to equality with the galloper in 
public esteem until it is abolished and class racing adopted. 
Every up-to-date promoter of trotting in this or any other 
European country would be glad to make the change to the 
American plan, and many attempts have been made in this 
direction; but for some unexplainable reason owners have 
for the mcst part declined the issue, and for the lark of 
entries these attempts have been usually pertial or complete 
failures. The handirap system encourages fraud, and races 
under it can hardly be called racing, for there is seldom a 
close finish, and usually a heal is a one-horse affair." This 
is probably a very fair presentation of the case. In this 
country a few handicap events have been tried, but so far 
without causing any appreciable demand for the general 
adoption of the system. It is probably safe to say that when 
trotters become plenty enough in Europe to admit of the 
adoption of class racing as carried on in this country, handi- 
cap races will become less popular over there, until finally 
the American system will come into general use.— Horse 
World. ■ 

The Western Horseman says Indianapolis horsemen are 
moving for a new trotling'association of which the Indiana- 
polis Matinee Club will form the nucleus. The additional 
membership will be gathered from leading harness horsemen 
throughout the state. A date will be claimed in the Grand 
Circuit. This will give Indiana three weeks in the Grand 
Circuit should Fort Wayne and Terra Haute also enter, 
which seems now highly probable. There is no reason why 
Indianapolis should not enter the Grand Circuit with profit. 
It is one of the great railroad centers, has a population of 
200,000, and one of the best mile rings in the country. 



January 6, 1900] 



8 



Colt Breaking. 



A colt cannot be handled too young, as first impressions 
are the most lasting, and we should be very careful that 
those impressions are the right ones. To show how well a 
young colt remembers, I will cite one instance. One of my 
brocdmaree, with her foal, about six hours old, got into the 
road and ran about one mile, where she entered a door-yard 
with her colt. I took them h'bme, and six weeks after, when 
1 drove the mare over the same road, the colt left her, and 
ran into the same dcor-yard, ard the mare had to ( e driven 
in before the colt could be induced to leave the yard. I be- 
lieve that a coil's training can be commenced anytime after 
he is a day old. The most important of all the word's used 
in (raining is the word, Whoa. I teach him the meaning of 
this word in the following manner. Standing on the near 
side I place my left hand under his neck where the throat- 
latch comes, and my right on his flank, on the offside. He 
ot once rushes either forwards or backwards, and I instantly 
hit him a sharp slap with my right hand, and say whoa 
(very short). He will almost invariably stand perfectly still 
and I at once commence rubbing and patting him very 
lightly with my right hand. He will soon try to get away 
again, and 1 repeat the treatment over and over until he is 
completely submissive. If he should throw himself 1 
quickly take advantage of the situation by placing my hands 
on his neck and holding bim down till 1 can rub hands over 
him in any spot, especially his head and legs, without his 
flinching. When this is accomplished 1 have a good founda- 
tion to commence building on, and every few days I keep 
teaching him something new, and by the time be is old 
enough to wear a harness he is nearly broken. A colt that 
is from three to five years old before he is broken must, of 
course, be handled somewhat differently, in halter break- 
ing a colt, I have for twenty years used what is called a 
"Yankee bridle." It can be made in many forms, but take a 
three-eighths or half-inch cotton rope, tie it around the 
colt's neck in the ordinary way, double the rope next to the 
knot, and let this doubled portion (say about one foot), pass 
through the moutb; then I throw the end of the rope over 
the neck just bsck of the ears, and pass it through the loop 
that just reach through the mouth far enough to receive it. 
That mikes a hiker that will lead the most stubborn. As 
soon as a colt is well halter-broken, I tie him in a roomy 
stall anl handle his feet until that part of his education is 
thoroughly completed. Then I teach him what the whip is 
for, and as but few trainers really know how bad it hurts, I 
would suggest that it would be well for all colt breakers to 
first give themselves a few clips and then use the whip on 
the horse just as hard as they cin stand it themselves. A 
whip should always be carried, but seldom used. A horse 
should become so familiar with the whip that it can be 
slashed around him, right and left, and he pay no attention 
to it, no matter how high strung he may be. 

I usually take ten days to break a colt and never hitch him 
up to to a cart till I have handled him about one week. He 
then knows what 1 want of him, and will do it every time. 

During the first week of a colt's training I go through all 
the motions of hitching up and unhitching, probably a score 
of times or more, and I am very careful to do as much work 
on the off side as the near side. 

A. blacksmith once asked me why nine out of ten thills, 
kicked out of carts, were on the o9 side, and I told him that 
it was because most horses were only broken on one side. 

I usually "bit" colts from one to three days and I give 
them several lessons a day, but I do not leave them checked 
up over a half an hour at a time. As s~>on as they are bitted 
I cross the holdbacks under the belly and fasten them to the 
thill loops, then run my lines through the breeching ring*, 
so the colt cmnot turn around. Then I commence driving 
him in all the worst places I can find. If there is a wood 
saw or a steam thresher near by, I get bim familiar with 
them, and when he can be driven and will stand any where I 
ask him to regatdless of his surroundings, he is broken well 
enough to bitch up. A celt should be fed well and kept 
right on his tiptoes while being broken, and then there is no 
guesswork about his being broken when he is turned over to 
his owner. I always use an open bridle until the colt is 
broken, then he can be driven with blinds if desired. I 
sometimes use a temporary blind made with a handkerchief 
or a twig of leaves, just to keep him from watching me from 
one side; that prevents him from forming the habit of side- 
lining. To prevent him from going s ; dewise behind, I use 
his tail for a rudder, and if commenced in time, he can very 
easily be kept straight. I have even stopped the habit of 
crossfiring in this way. No set rule can be given to prevent 
and cure the many bad notions horses will get into, but the 
main thing is to take advantage of every opportunity the in- 
stant it is presented. In my twenty years' experience hand- 
ling colts and vicious horses, I have never thrown but one 
horse to subdue him. I seldom use a kick strap and never 
any other "togglement" when a horse is in harness. If he is 
"light' behind I take him on a piece of ground that is icy, 
not too slippery, as he might injure himself. He will then 
very soon learn to keep his feet where they are the most 
needed. I then turn him about in every direction, and he 
very soon learns to do just what I tell him. 

In getting him used to the cart, before hitching him up, he 
should be allowed to look it all over and touch it with his 
nose. I then begin to rub it against him until he will allow 



the crossbar to come against his legs, and the thills against 
his tide, using one hand to bold him by the head and the 
other to move the thills frcm side to side and the cart back 
and fortb. Then if he makes a bad move the thills can be 
dropped and thus avoid a smashup and ruined horse, which 
is often the result if the colt is bitched right up the first 
thiDg before he is accustomed to the movement oi the cart. 
After he can be turned around to the right and to the left 
without showing any signs of fear when the thills or crossbar 
hit him, he is ready to be hitched up; and instead of driving 
him ten miles the first time, as is often done to take the 
"tuck" out of him, I never drive bim but a few rods and 
back, and hitch him up several times the same day. He 
will not get sweaty or chafed then, and will be educated and 
not "broke 1 ' (constitution and all). When a colt shows a 
great dislike to being hitched up and drives as if in a great 
hurry to get into the stable, I very soon have his desires 
changed by letting him have his own way. I let him go to 
the box stall, then I check him up a few notches and leave 
him till he takes a good sweat. It seldom required but one 
lesson, as any colt likes to go where he gets the best treat- 
ment, and they are not slow to learn. 

Every colt should be taught to step at the word, whether 
they are going ahead or backing up, as it will often prevent 
serious accidents. I have often noticed that fast horses are 
often slow thinkers, and one should not be too anxious to hit 
them with the whip if they do not start the instant they are 
spoken to. They should always be started on a turn, to the 
right or left, and given their head as soon as the guiding 
line has been pulled just a little, when the word is given. 
Should he back up or rear, I stop him and back him up or 
turn him the other way, or take him by the head or do any- 
thing to change his mind a little, for if you have one set 
rule to follow he will also have one set rule to follow, and it 
is usually a bad one. When teaching him to back do not 
pull on him till his neck forms the letter S, but give him a 
quick but firm jerk that will set him back before he has a 
chance to think or brace himself. Then instantly cease on 
the lines and say "back." After repeating it once or twice 
he will back all you want him to by just giving the lines 
short, quick jerks, and later by a steady pull, but the instant 
you see him begin to twist his neck and brace himself you 
must stop pulling and take him by surprise again. In this 
way a horse will soon ham to back almost as much as he 
can pull. 

In an article like this it is impossible to touch on but a 
few of the main features of horse training, so I will close 
hoping that I have at least given one new idea that will be 
helpful tj the reader.— E. C. Eaglesfield in ChristmaB Horse 
Review. 

The Broodmare and Colt. 



Altamont 2:26 3-4 and Arthur W. 2:11 1-2. 



Never select a mare for breeding purposes unless she is a 
good individual, not one with any bony enlargements or de- 
fective hocks. Select one with a well shaped head and an 
intelligent eye. 

Breed her to a stallion that has individuality, and from a 
family that reproduces. Give her the usual work or exercise 
she has been accustomed to up to a reasonable time before 
foaling. 

The mare at time of foaling should be in a commodious 
box stall, or better, in a paddock or field, if weather is favor- 
able. After foaling give the mare plenty of nutritious food! 
bran, crushed oats, etc., stimulating her nourishment for the 
foal. 

Teach the foal to eat with the mare as soon as possible! 
fence off a small place for bim to run in and out of, so the 
mare cannot get his feed. 

It is a good plan to give the foal an irjection of soap and 
water shortly after birth, as this will open up his bowels at 
once. Many foals are lost by allowing them to become 
costive or bound np. 

Halter break the colt when a few days old, and break him 
early in lite to harness, as they are easier handled when 
young. The better care and feed he gets the first two years, 
especially the first, the better animal you will make of him. 
Feed and care is everything in developing a colt. 

How to Clean Harness. 



To clean a harness and clean it right is a trick that very 
few can do, although they would not own up to the fact. 
Follow these directions and if you are not pleased with 
the result you will be out but little more than your time. 
Get a bucket of warm water, rain water if you can, but it 
must be warm. Wash the harness clean, using any good 
standard make of harness soap. Pull the ends of the straps 
out of the loops, unbuckle the lines from the bridle 
squeeze the sponge very often and keep it as clean as you 
can. When you have the straps all clean go over them 
again with your sponge as clean as you can get it and full 
of lather as heavy as if to be used for shaving; then take a 
very little of a good harness dressing and coat them over 
very lightly. In this last operation you should use but a 
very small quantity of the dressing and squeeze the sponge 
out very frequently. Wash it out in the water bucket, 
tqueez) it dry as you can, dip it lightly in the dressing 
and brush it over the strap. It will look like water at 
the first glance, but in a minute it is dry and you have a 
very nice gloss that will not soil hand or glove and to which 
the dust will not slick. Remember that you cannot obtain 
satitfactory results withcut warm water and a clean tponge. 



Two stallions are making the season of 1900 at J. M. 
Nelson's stables at the Alameda race track— Altamont 2:26$ 
and Arthur W. 2:11 }. The first named u known in a greater 
or less degree to every horseman in America as being one of 
the very few stallions, living or dead, that have six 2:10 per- 
formers, and we believe the great Onward alone shares with 
him the honor of having six with records belter than 2:10. 
Altamont, purchased by Jay Beach when but a very young 
horse, passed the greater part of his life in Oregon and 
Washington, where high class mares were few, but from 
them begot Chehalis 2:04}, Del Norte 2:08, Doc Sperry 2:09, 
Pathmont 2:09}, Ella T. 2:08} and Altao 2:09|, besides three 
others in the 2:15 list and 41 in the 2:30 list. 



Almont 33.. 



fAbdallah 15 

I 

• •! 
I 

(.Sally Anderson., 



t Hambletonian 10 

( Katy Darling 
Mambrino Chief 11 
Kate by Pilot Jr. 



I Sue Ford •{ 

I . 



f Brown Chief 4)45., 
I 



(.Daughter of.. 



Mambrino Chief 11 
Dau. of Bay Messenger 
imp. Hooton 
Dau. of imp. Buzzard 

Almont 33, the sire of Altamont, was one of the greatest of 
speed progenitors and probably has more descendants in the 
standard list than any other horse. He sired 37 standard 
performers, 96 of his tons produced 419 standard trotters and 
123 standard pacers up to the close of 1898, while 74 of his 
daughters produced 95 trotters and 22 pacers wilh standard 
records up to the same time. The number of his grandsons 
and granddaughters that are producers is very large and the 
number of his descendants in the list runs up into the thous- 
ands. 

Sue Ford, the dam of Altamont, was also the dsm of 
Alburn and Trouble, both producing sires, and was a very 
highly formed mare, having great style and much quality, 
which her son Altamont almost invariably reproduces in his 
offspring. Sue Ford's dam was a thoroughbred mare by 
imp. Hooton, out of a mare by imp. Buzzard, blood that is 
of the best that England has contributed to this country. At 
25 years of age Altamont is in full strength and vigor, and 
Mr. Nelson reports that 90 per cent, of the mares bred to him 
last year are now ia foil. 

Arthur Wilkes 2:11,1 has made an excellent reputation on 
the race track, and from his breeding and individuality be 
should, with time and opportunity, attain to greatness in the 
stud. He has been raced since bis three year old form. 
Foaled in 1894, he started first in 1897, taking a mark of 
2:15} lhat year and winning most of his races, never being 
outside of the money but once. As a four year old be 
started but three times, winning once and being second twice 
to Little Thorne 2:09£. 

Last year he was one of the best winners on the California 
circuit and reduced his record to 2:11-1. In his career 
Arthur W. has started fourteen times, winning six races, four 
second moneys, was twice third, once second and unplaced 
but once. He is a big, strong going horse, game as a pebble 
and has shown wonderful speed. 

(Guy Wilkes 2:15^ 
( Arthur Wilkes.... 1 
I (2:28^) 
jt* f Wayland W...< 
2 (2:12^) I 



(.Lettie.. 



( Gracie by Arthurton 
t Wayland Forrest 
( Mary by Flaxtail 



fGrand Moor.. 



Lady Moor . 



Daughter ot. 



fThe Moor 

( Vashti by Mamb. Patchen 
Finch's Glencoe 
Dau. of Williamson's Belmont 

His breeding is worth studying. His eire, Wayland W. 
2:12-1, was a good race horse, his grandsire, Arthur W. 2:28}, 
sired Welcome 2:10}, Wayland W. 2:12}, Hobo 2:14}, Filz 
Lee 2:13} and other fast ones, while his great grandsire Guy 
Wilkes 2 : 15} was not only a great race horse, but one of the 
greatest of sires. 

Arthur W.'s dam is Lady Moor, who is also the dam of 
John A, (3) 2:14, a full brother to Arthur W. Lady Moor 
is by Grand Moor and he is not only a producer of speed, but 
is the sire of the dams of five 2:15 performers, including the 
dams of Joe Wheeler 2:07}, Arthur W. 2:11}, and Hum- 
boldt Maid 2:13}, Grand Moor was a royally bred horse, 
being a son of The Moor sire of the great Beautiful Bells, 
and out of Vashti a producing daughter of Mambrino 
Patchen. The dam of Lady Moor was a daughter of Finch's 
Glencoe, he by imported Glencoe, and the next dam a 
daughter of Williamson's Belmont. In the pedigree of 
Arthur W. as tabulated above, every dam given, except the 
thoroughbreds, are producers, and every sire except the 
thoroughbreds are pioducers of speed and all on the top line 
have records. Arthur W. should be one of the most valuable 
additions to the list of stallions doing duty in California this 
year. 

Kendall Spavin Cure. 



Glencoe, Rupert, W. Va., July 18, '97. 

Dr. B. J. Kendall Co : 

PleaEc send me one of your "Treatise on the Horse." I have used 
your 3pavin Cure and removed a curb from my 11000 mare. 

Fbances Brown. 



4 



mjz gve&ev axil* gtpoxi&mctn. 



[January 6, 1900 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

The Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 



22 1=2 GEARY STREET, San Francisco. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 

C. E. Goodrich, Special Representative, 31 Park Row, N ew York. 

Tenn»-One Year S3, Six Months 81.75. Three Months SI, 

bTRICTLY IS ADVANCE. 

Money should be Fent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. \V. Kelley. 22% Geary 3t. San Fiancisco, Cal 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer s rame and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee cf 
good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 6, 1900. 



THE GREATEST MISTAKE made by the District 
Fair Associations of California has invariably been in 
failing to make an early official announcement of the 
date of their meetings and the amount of purses to be 
offered. While this entirely unnecessary delay on the 
part of the associations has led to some inconvenience 
and loss to trainers and horse owners, the loss to the 
associations themselves has been far greater, and in 
many cases has resulted in making their meetings fail- 
ures and sometimes necessitated their being abandoned 
or declared off entirely. It is to be hoped that the 
year 1900 will not see a repetition of this error on the 
part of the district boards. The time for these officials 
to get together is right now and every district in the 
State should be ready to officially announce by February 
1st, whether it will hold a fair and race meeting during 
the year, where it is to be held and what dates are 
claimed for it. It is not necessary to name the date of 
closing entries. The Board should be able to decide by 
that time how many days' racing it can give, how many 
purses and of what value, and on what track they will 
be decided. Let us take the Solano District as an ex- 
ample. The Directors of that association could meet 
this month and by the first of February send out the 
following official notice to horsemen: "The Solano 
Fair for 1900 will be held at Vallejo during the month 
of August. The speed program will consist of three 
harness events per day for six days. The purses will 

range from $ to $ each. Entries will close 

July 1st, and classes will be announced June 1st. 
Signed, Secretary." If the Solano Association and 
every district association in the State could make such 
an announcement by February 1st, there would be such 
a revival ot horse training in the State that every race 
track would be filled. The now comparatively idle tracks 
at Petaluma, Napa, Woodland, lied Bluff, Chico and 
many other points would be occupied daily with horses 
being trained for the meetings, and thousands of dollars 
put in circulation that will otherwise be idle. The 
Directors of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association will meet some time this month to talk over 
the situation and an announcement of this organiza- 
tion's program for 1900 will thereafter be made. The 
district boards should be ready to act by that time and 
by so doing not only insure harness horsemen an oppor- 
tunity to race, but by exciting a greater interest in such 
matters insure successful and profitable meetings in 
every fair district. 



THE SPLAN-NEWGASS SALE which will be 
held in Chicago during the last three days of this month 
and the first three of next, is attracting wide attention 
all over the east and west and there is certain to be a 
large attendance of the best buyers in America and 
Europe.- The horses consigned are a choice lot, the 
name of Manager 2:00$, Nutwood's fastest son being 
among them, and there are sons and daughters of Alcan- 
tara, George Wilkes, Wilton, Stamboul, Onward, Guy 
Wilkes, Allerton and many others of the great sires. 
Milo Knox is getting his consignment ready at the Ala- 
meda track. Da Bernardi Basler 2:ltj| and Billy Mc- 
Kinley 2:25 are among them. The California consign- 
ment is as fine a lot of horses as have been sent East 
from here for some time and they should meet with 
ready sale in the Chicago market. 




Death of D. E. Knight. 



Just as we go to press the sad news comes to us by 
telegraph of the death Friday morning of Mr. D. E, 
Knight, of Marysville, President of the Pacific Coast 
Trotting Horse Breeders Association, Director of the 
State Agricultural Society and one of the pioneer busi- 
ness men and manufacturers of this State. Mr. Knight 
came to California in 1852 and six years later settled 
in Marysville, where he resided with his wife until the 
day of his death, and where he built a large fortune 
by his own abilities and honest endeavors. Among the 
enterprises in which he led and was the principal owner 
were the celebrated Woolen Mills, the Electric Light 
and Gas Company, the Yuba City Railway, the Empire 
Foundry, the Decker-Jewett Bank, the Evening Demo- 
crat and many other of the leading institutions of the 
city of Marysville. Mr. Knight was one of the earliest 
horse breeders of the Slate and breeding and racing 
trotters was his diversion. He has had the satisfaction 
of seeing a colt of bis breeding win the rich Occident 
Stake, and his horses were always entered at the district 
fairs and driven for the money in every heat. His 
death is a most serious loos to the harness horse breeding 
and racing industry of California, and to the State and 
especially the city and county of his residence, bis de- 
mise is an actual calamity. Mr. Knight was a son of 
Vermont, having been born in the town of Tunbridge 
74 years ago. He was an upright, honorable citizen^ 
whose life was an open book and whose example to his 
fellow-man has always been worthy of emulating. No 
man in California will be more sincerely mourned by 
those who know him than he. 



THE EVIDENCE IS OVERWHELMING that 
there is a genuine healthy revival in the trotting horse 
industry. The prices received in the East and in Cali- 
fornia recently for fast and promising trotters were suffi- 
cient, but the number of entries being received in all 
the trotting stakes adds still more to the convincing 
testimony. The Occident. Stake for 1902, which will be 
trotted at the California State Fair of that year, has 
nearly, if not quite, a hundred entries, which is about 
30 more than it has ever heretofore received. The pay- 
ments on the races for this and next year are more numer- 
ous in proportion than formerly and this is also true of 
the Stanford Stake. The owners of trotters intend to 
train them and that means good times for horsemen. It 
is to be a prosperous new year. 



ATTENTION IS CALLED to the fact that twenty- 
five rich stakes offered by the Brighton Beach Racing 
Association for the season of 1900 will close on Thurs- 
day next, January 11th. During the past few years 
this association has expended a vast amount of money 
in beautifying its grounds, and it is now one of the most 
commodious and convenient race tracks in the country 
The stakes to close next Thursday have added money in 
every instance and will be worth quite large sums to 
the winners, while the terms are most liberal. Entries 
to the same should be addressed to Secretary, Brighton 
Beach Racing Association, 215 Montague Street, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 



A COMPETENT STARTER will be one of the ab- 
solute necessities to make the harness racing season en- 
tirely successful in California this year. It seems to be 
the consensus of opinion among those who are interested 
in the matter that there is at present no home talent 
available which can be secured with any assurance of 
being satisfactory, and that some competent person from 
beyond the Rockies should be employed to visit Califor- 
nia during the harness racing season of 1900, and wield 
the flag at all the meetings on the main circuit. Of 
course it is beyond question for any one organization to 
stand the expense of bringing a competent starting judge 
clear across the continent for one week's meeting as the 
expense would be far too great, but if say six or seven 
of the districts could combine with the State Fair and 
Breeders Association a starter could be secured at a not 
too heavy expense. There is no doubt that with good 
judges in the stand, a good starter, and a firm determi- 
nation on the part of all associations to strictly enforce 
the rules, harness racing can be made very popular in 
this State. A competent starter is probably the most 
serious consideration at present, and it seems to be the 
general opinion that he should come from outside the 
S:ate. A stranger will command more respect from 
drivers, and if he comes with a reputation for strictly and 
impartially enforcing all rules he will find that his task 
is not a difficult one. We believe the drivers of Cali- 
fornia will average as well for deportment and fairness 
as the reinsmen of any State in the Union, and it only 
needs firm, fair aDd competent men in the etands to 
demonstrate this fact. Let us have a first class starter 
and competent judges. The horsemen will then do their 
part. 



THE STALLION STAKE given by the California 
State Agricultural Society and which closed January 1st, 
promises, being one of the richest stakes to be run for in 
America, and many are already predicting that it will 
be worth $20,000. Returns are not all in yet, but up to 
Tuesday, January 2d, Secretary Shields had received 78 
entries. No other stallion stake ever received as many 
Directors of the society and Secretary Shields are to be 
congratulated over the result. Next week we shall 
give a list of all the nominations and present some com- 
ments upon them. 



HORSE OWNERS should remembar that the breed- 
ing season has already begun and they cannot make 
their announcements too early. Some half dozen 
stallions are already advertised in this issue and this is 
the first week of the new year. The Breeder and 
Sportsman is prepared to print thoroughly up to date 
stallion cards, with half-tone engravings of the horse, 
tabulated pedigrees, etc., at most reasonable terms. Send 
in your orders to this office and have the work done 
right- 



A New Years Day Trot. 



At Santa Maria, down in Santa Barbara county, the festiv- 
ities incidental to tisheriog in the new year were added to 
by a match race between three horses well known in that 
vicinity, each of which bad its admirers and consequently 
also had its backers among the crowd that went out to the 
track to see the question of supremacy decided. 

The horses named for this race were the stallion Thompson 
2:144 by Boodle 2:12}, owned by Mr. J. B. Bonetti, the bay 
horse Adjutant by Electro, son of Electioneer, owned by C. 
O. Thornquest, and Leader, a son of Tom Benton, owned 
by W. 8. Lierly. The race was for $60 a corner, with $100 
added by the Driving Association, which brought the puree 
up to $250, and the event drew a large crowd to the track. 
Mr. Bonetti bad secured the services of the well known 
reinsman B. O. Van Bokkelen to pilot his horse, but Mr. 
Thorcquest and Mr. Lierly held the lines behind their own 
entries and both are expert 'leamstera." 

The day was not a favorable one for fast time, and the 
track was six or seven seconds slow, being heavy and rough. 
The horses were all out to win if they eould however. Ad- 
jutant was under the wire first in the first heat in 2:21, and 
he is probably the first horse to lower his record this year. 
It formerly stood at 2:23 J, Thompson was second in the heat 
and Leader third. 

After this the big Boodle horse won in three straight heats 
the summary of the race being as follows: 

Special Match Race— }250. 

Thompson, ch c by Boodle - (Van Bokkelen) 2 111 

Adjutant, D h by Electro (Thornqueat) 1 3 3 3 

Leader, b g by Tom Benton (Lierly) 3 2 2 2 

Tlme-2:21, 2:20, 2:24, 2:26. 

After this race was finished there was a quarter mile and 
repeat race for saddle horses in which seven horses starteJ. 
Butcher Boy won the first heat, and Flavorite the next two, 

the time being 0:25, 0:25* and 0:26. 



January 6, 1900J 



& I)* gvec&ev an* &povt*maxu 



5 



Hambletonian Wilkes. 



Horses Not Degenerating. 



Geo. Wilkes, the orphan colt raised "on the bottle," lived 
to be one of the great race horees of his day and in the stud 
founded the greatest trotting family in the history of the 
turf, in that his descendants have won more races and more 
money than those of any other sire. 

Here in California there is at the present time but one son 
of this great horse, this is Hambletonian Wilkes 1679, and 
he is himself a great sire of race horses, among his get being 
Phoebe Wilkes 2:08J, Tommy Mac 2:11\, New Era 2:13, 
Sybil 8. 2:16J, Arline Wilkes 2:11}, Rocker 211 and 
twenty-five others with records better than 2:30. Maud 
Murray, a daughter of Hambletonian Wilkes, recently sold 
for $1500 to an Australian dealer, and it is reported that 
she trotted a trial mile in 2:12 since reaching Europe and 
was resold for $5000. "The Geo. Wilkes blood is the best 
for race horses," says a well known trainer, and if so breel 
era should get it as close to its source as possible. George 
Wilkes' record was 2:22 and he is up to the close of 1898 the 
sire of 72 trotters and 11 pacers with standard records, he 
has 96 producing sons that have sired 1414 trotters and 586 
pacers in the list, while 88 of his daughters produced 132 
standard performers. Geo. Wilkes was by Hambletonian 10 
out of Dolly Spanker, whose pedigree unfortunately has 
never been clearly established, but has been the subject of 
endless controversy among turf writers. Dolly Spanker was 
once registered in the books as by Henry Clay out of the mare 
Telegraph by Baker's Highlander, and it may yet be proven 
some day that this breeding is correct. 
2? (Abdallah 1 



g fGeo. Wilkes 519. 
M 

Hi 

is 



(■Hambletonian 10 
I 



1 



Dolly Spanker.. 



i Chaa. Kent Mare 
f untraced 
(untraced 



c 

fa 
►J 

g Mag Lock 
■< 
M 



f American Star 14. 



(.Lady Irwin. 



Star 



(■Stockholm's Am. 
\ Sally Slouch 
( Hambletonian 10 
1 By Abdallah Chief 
The dam of Hambletonian Wilkes was Mag Lock, a 
daughter of American Star, and her dam was Lady Irwin 
by Hambletonian 10. Lady Irwin was the grandam of 
Lumps 2:21. It will be seen that Hambletonian Wilkes has 
two crosses of the old Hero of Chester close up. His get 
here in California have invaiiably been good lookers, and 
show great speed, and at Green Meadow Farm at Santa 
Clara where Hambletonian Wilkes will probably make the 
season of 1900, can be seen some of the best looking two and 
three year olds by him that were ever foaled on a California 
farm. In this day when the rule is to breed to the best 
Hambletonian Wilkes should get a large patronage from the 
leading breeders. 

$250 For Gaff Topsail Three Year Olds. 



Mr. Eavanagh, of Vallejo, California, who owns the chest- 
nut stallion Gaff Topsail 2:174, has decided to place him in 
the stud this year, and as an inducement to have the get of 
the horse trained has offered a purse of $250 for them to 
compete for on the Vallejo track in 1904. Gaff Topsail is 
undoubtedly one of the fastest sons of Diablo 2:09} and is 
much faster than his record. His sire, Diablo, is one of 
the best bred horses in America, and this year seven of his 
get got standard marks, more new performers than any Cali- 
fornia stallion, and Clipper 2:09£ paced the fastest mile paced 
in the State by a green horse. 



* 1 
P> f Diablo 2:09i^...< 



f Chas. Derby 2:20.. 



[ Bertha , 



Belle 



l Alcona 730. 
l.8tringham . 



1 Stein way 2:25% 
( Katie G. by Electioneer 
Alcantara 729 
Barcena by Bayard 53 

(Almont 33 

( Queen Mary by Mam. Chiet 11 

Slim Lick 
Dau. of Billy Cheatham 

As will be seen )by the above tabulation Gaff Topsail is a 8 
well bred as anybody's horse. His dam was by Alcona 730, 
one of the handsomest horses ever brought to California 
and a sire of speed. Alcona's sire was the great Almont, 
his dam Queen Mary by Mambrino Chief. The dam of 
Belle was Stringham, a mare by Jim Lick, he a son of 
Homer. Stringham'a dam was by the thoroughbred horse 
Billy Cheatham, a grandson of the immortal Boston. 

Gaff Topsail is a fine looking animal, with good bone, 
siz? and endurance and should prove a successful sire. He 
will make the season at the Vallejo race track. 



The Best Blister on Earth. 



Andoveb, Me., Dec. 14, '97. 
The Lawrence-WilliamB Co., Cleveland, O. : 

I have used and sold Gombault's Caustic Balsam for the last six 
years and It is considered by myself and customers the best blister 
on earth for removing spavins, splints, shackles, etc. I own a nice 
black mare nine years old that I removed a bone spavin from, clean 
and smooth, over a year ago, with Caustic Balsam, and will give her 
to any man living if he can tell which leg it was on. I also re- 
moved a shackle from another horse with the Balsam, and have 
known of several similar cases among my costomers. 

F. A. Russell, 



["Iconoclast" in Spirit of the West.] 
Probably the most illusive idea that ever found lodgment 
in the human brain is that somewhi re in the past there was 
a "golden age" when the men were strorjger, wiser, braver, 
the women more beautiful, more lovely; when the flowers 
were a brighter hue, the skies were less cloudless and serene, 
and the human life was a scene of perpetual peace and 
Arcadian beauty. Poets sigh for and philosophers sometimes 
descant upon the "good old times," which they tell us have 
gone, never to return. 

All this is a little more than idle dreaming. We are 
living not only in the best, but the oldest times the world 
has ever seen. The men are as strong, as brave as they have 
ever been in the world's history, and each succeeding gener- 
ation adds to their wisdom. No century has ever produced 
a roll of great men in every department of science, cf art, of 
literature, in statesmanship and in war superior to that of 
the nineteenth and any nineteenth-century lover will swear 
that the maid of his choice is more bea itiful than Helen or 
Cleopatra. 

It has alwayB been the fashion to laud ths superiority of 
the past. Homer makes old Nestor boast of the prodigies of 
strength and valor performed by the contemporaries of his 
youth, and Scott puts in the mouth of one of his heroes a 
lament for the decay of "Scottish strength in modern day." 
It is probable that in the mere natural qualities with which 
the human race is endowed there is little difference between 
the different ages. The Grecian art and Grecian culture of 
3000 years ago were equal to any modern art or any mod- 
ern culture. Occasionally there are phenomenal men who 
really do not belong to any age or country. They belong to 
the world and to all time. Homer was born in Greece and 
Shakespeare was born in England, after an interval of sev- 
eral thousand years, but though each took the mould of the 
country and age in which he lived, each belonged to human- 
ity and to all time. 

The capacity of the human race to produce poets, orators, 
statesmen and heroes is perennial, is indestructible. It has 
never died. It has never faltered. Environment sometimes 
affects the apparent operation of the laws under which it is 
manifested, but change the environment and the same capac- 
ity again appears. For almost every great crisis a man 
presents himself who is equal to it. 

The occasion does not make the man, it only affords op- 
portunity for the exercise of his powers. Without the 
French revolution we would have had no Napoleon as he ap- 
pears to us now, but we would have had a great law giver, a 
great administrator, a great orator, a great mathematician, or 
possibly a great poet. He possessed the elements of all these 
characters. Thiers said that "to the genius of a geometer he 
added the imagination of a poet." 

It is not true, as has been asserted, that the men of the 
present are "men of small stature, mere parts of a crowd; 
born too late, when the strength of the word has been bowed.'' 
Our late war proved that. The age that produced the heroes 
and statesmen of that war was as heroic as any in history, and 
the age that could produce a Tennyson and a Swinburne, a 
Carlyle, a Macauley, a DiQuincy, a Dickens, a Thackeray, a 
George Eliot, a Darwin, a Huxley, a Tyndall, a Bismarck 
and a Gladstone is not an age of pigmies. Future genera 
tions will no doubt look back upon the nineteenth century as 
at least one of the golden ages. 

It may seem like a great descent to stoop from the heroes 
and sages of ancient and modern times to discuss horses, and 
possibly it is; but, as the reader knows, it is at least to some 
minds a question which is the nobler animal, man or horse, 
and in estimating the relative merits of horses of the present 
day and their remote progenitors the same principles are apt 
to control our judgment as in comparing latter day men with 
their progenitors. Old men (the Nestors of the turf) still 
like to descant upon the speed and stamina of the horses they 
knew in their younger days. 

Who is there that has been a horse owner from his youth 
up that has not owned or driven "the best road horse or 
mare in the world?" I plead guilty to having had several 
of that kind myself. Who is there that has not had some 
prodigy of speed, but alas never tested by that illusion de- 
stroyer, a stop watch? Who is there that has not owned a 
colt that if afforded the opportunity would have eclipsed 
Electioneer or George Wilkes? Every old driver has at 
some time had a horse in charge, either his own or some one 
else's, that was really the most remarkable the world had 
ever seen. How many such "flowers have been born to blush 
unseen 1" 

The simple, naked unadorned fact is that we have better 
horses to-day than we ever had before for the purpose for 
which they are used. We have trotting sires that are greater 
by far than Hambletonian, and will prove greater than Elec- 
tioneer or George Wilkes. The greatest pacing sire that 
the world has ever seen is still living and doing stud service, 
but he is likely in time to be surpassed by some of his sons, 
for instance, Star Pointer. We have as fast and as game 
race horses. The two mile record has been broken in Europe 
this year, and the half-mile ((fficial time) record was frac- 
tured by two horses at Lexington. Early speed trials have 
simply been dazzling in their brilliancy, even if at some 
times injudicious. These trials, however, show what the 
young things are capable of. 



There are horses in training (hat should be able to break 
all the records, if not this year, then the next, or the follow- 
ing. What matters a year or two? The world never saw 
such speed capacity as is now exhibited upon our race tracks. 
We started out to create a race of trotting horses, and we've 
done it. No one can watch the training year after year on 
our tracks as I have done and question the truth cf this 
proposition. True, we find occasionally a reversion to some 
old plug ancestor that couldn't trot "a little bit," but this 
kind is getting scarcer every year. Nearly all of them that 
are trained can do something fairly res; ectable, and the best, 
why, they are simply wonders ! Talk about the trotter being 
still in the formative stage! If this be true I'd like to live 
to see the time when he is fully formed. He will be a 
prodigy and no mistake. When he can go to the quarter 
pole in 29 seconds and to the half in 1:01, he'll do pretty 
well, won't he ? 

And stamina I Just watch them being trained and then 
talk about stamina. Three, four, five and six heats, and each 
heat a speed trial I There never was another horse capable 
of such exertions. There isn't a long distance record now 
standing that couldn't easily be beaten by horses now on our 
tracks. The trouble is that trainers don't want to waste 
time training for long distance records. There are no prizes 
for them, and the horses we are training that could perform 
such feats are too busy getting ready to win money in the 
big stakes and purses. 

Let the association offer $5000 to a horse that will beat the 
two, three or four-mile record and the feat will be accom- 
plished next year by probably a half dczen horses. These 
long distance lecords have mostly been taken with very in- 
ferior horses to those we now have. Looking at the matter 
from a business standpoint I think it would be well to have a 
few long distance races now, for trotters of this kind are just 
what our cousins across the water are pining for. There 
isn't the slightest doubt that we could supply them. Whether 
one or two of such races wouldn't add to the strength of a 
trotting program is a matter well worth pondering over. 

If there had been any doubt as to the fact that the pacer is 
now a better animal than ever before, it would have been 
set at rest by the performances of such horses as JoePatchen, 
John R. Gentry and more than all, Star Pointer. It had 
been discovered years ago that the pacer had the speed to go 
in two minutes, as Westmont bad done it with a running 
mate. But whether he could carry such a clip for a mile 
drawing a sulky and driver was the question. This is now 
happily settled, and the next problem is to find others that 
do the same thing besides Star Pointer. I feel very confi- 
dent that it will be done, and it would not at all surprise me 
if it should be done next year. 

One does not have to look to the remote past fcr pedigree 9 
of trotting and pacing speed. The "golden age" of trotters 
and pacers is now. We are not quite past improvement yeti 
but we are well along toward the summit of the hill; at least 
we are able to look over the top into the promised land. 
We are now producing the horses that can get there. When 
a four year old stallion with one season's handling can trot a 
mile in 2:12| and a quarter in 31} seconds, we haven't far 
to go. 

I believe also that the thoroughbied is now a better horse 
for the purpose for which he is used than ever before. I do 
not believe that he is as good a long distance horse, but then 
he is not used much for long distances. A long distance race 
is a rare event, and I suppose nowadays it is hardly worth 
while to breed for that class of horees. People breed for the 
market and the market demands sprinters. Occasionally a 
horse is bred that can go a long distance, but my information 
is that they are rather rare. However; we'll not quarrel 
about this, but let the running people do things in their own 
way, which they are tolerably sure to do anyhow. They are 
breeding a horse that is admirably adapted to th«ir purpose, 
and that's want they want. That's all they could do with 
Lexington, Boston or Sir Archy. In getting race horses, I 
believe that Hanover was as successful as any of them, so 
that even among the runners there is no necessity to go back 
into the misty past to find the great horses. - 



Owners preparing horses for market would do well to 
bear in mind (he advice of one of (be largest dealers in the 
country, who writes as follows: "We are particularly 
anxious to impress cn would-be consignors that what we 
want are useful horses — something that a man can use for 
pleasure or business in mediately. Our customers have not 
the time or disposition to buy a horse and wait on him to 
get in condition for use. A horse, (0 be useful in the ci(y> 
must be absolutely fearless of all objects that he comes in 
contact with. He must have style, manners, speed and action 
enough to make him pleasant to ride behind. Men who 
send cheap and poorly conditioned animals to the sale will 
be bound to meet with disappointment, as we have absolutely 
no demand for that class of goods." 



"I have found your Bronchial Troches 
most useful for hoarseness and colds." I'kof. 
L. Ricci, Queens College, London, Eng. 

BBnWATQ Bronchial 
BKUWN d Troches 

OP BOSTON 

Sold in boxes only— Avoid imitations. 







[Januakt 6, 1900 



The Sulky. 



8talls are rapidly filling at Pleasanton. 



Woodland will certainly hold a fair this year. 



Ntjtwood is the greatest sire of dams of 2:15 performers. 



Eight hundred second payments in the Kentucky Futurity. 

Every district association Bhouid get to work on its pro" 
gram as soon as possible. 

Dollade Wilkes 2:121, by Guy Wilkes, will go through 
next season's Grand Circuit. 



Vai.lfjo promises giving one of the best harness meet- 
ings on the circuit this season. 

A green 9on of Diiect, now in George West's stable, is 
expected to beat 2:10 next season. 



The cold air is not half so penetrating to a clipped horse 
as to one with his coat on and wet. 



Lolita 2:17 by 8idnev, is said to be one of the very swift- 
est brushers on the Buffalo speedway. 



Deb Moines, Iowa, will give a meeting the first week in 
July at which $20,000 will be hung up in purses. 



A couple of Boston men recently offered $20,000 for the 
stallion Jupe 2:07}, but the offer was declined. 



All the horses that ever paced or trotted in 2:04 or better 
are alive with the exception of the pacer Bumps 2:03}. 



W. O. Foote says John Nolan 2:08 is wintering splendidly 
and he looks for him to be faster than ever next seasou. 



Mambrino King was not bred by the late Dr. Herr as 
stated in the books. Ambrose Young, of Lexington, bred 
him. 

There is a two year old by Falrose owned in Yolo county 
that stepped a quarter better that 40 seconds in his yearling 
form. 



The first harness race in California for 1900 was won by 
Santa Maria on New Year's Day by Thompson 2:14}, at 
Boodle 2:12}. 

M. E. McHenry says he thinks J. H. Thayer's colt, The 
Bondsman by Baron Wilkes, the best trotter in eight today 
without a record. 



John Dickebson has put just a dozen horses in the 2:10 
list according to an Eastern exchange, which is certainly a 
pretty good record. 

W. 8. Lierly, the well known Santa Maria horseman, 
had his hand badly bitten the other day by a colt he was 
holding while having it shod. 



The Detroit Driving Club has announced that the M. & 
M. and the Chamber of Commerce stakes will be closed on 
the same date as in years past. 



The Overland Park Driving Club of Denver has been 
leased for another year, and a two weeks meeting will be 
given again beginning June 10th. 



It is said that Pittsburg, Pa., will be an applicant for 
dates in the Grand Circuit the coming season, and so will 
Terra Haute and probably Indianapolis. 



H. H. Helm an, of San Jose, has been down to Monterey 
county looking at a couple of "prospects" that he thinks 
ought to be good for the races this year. 



Bktonica 2:10}, has been dangerously sick, and it is 
doubtful if he will ever be trained again. He has been one 
of the disappointments in the horse business. 



Harry Deverktjx of Cleveland stands an excellent 
chance of beating the present trotting record to wagon in 
1900 with his stallion John A. McKerron 2:12}. 



Kyote 2:15}, by Van 8ant died in George 8tarr's stable at 
Terre Haute last week. He was a very fast horse having 
shown miles in 2:09, but had always been unfortunate. 



The scarcity of horses in the southern part of the State 
has reached such a point that bronchos are being herded in 
from the ranges and broken for work in the railroad camps. 



Walter Masten of Woodland shipped twenty-five horses 
to the Hawaiian Islands this week. There were some good 
road horses among them, the others being general purpose 
horses. 



Lenna N. 2:05}, Bella A. 2:08}, Brightlight 2:08}, Laurel 
2:09}. Susie T. 2:09i, Gold Leaf 2:11} and Jessie C. 2:17}, 
art some of the mares J. H. Shults will breed to Directly 
2:03} in the spring. 



8. N. Mitchell, formerly of Oregon, is now located at 
the Cbico track and is training a stable of trotters which he 
will campaign on the Oregon tracks next summer. They 
are all colts and green horses. 



When the new stalls were built at Pleasanton Training 
Track, many of the stalls were fitted with doors a little less 
than four feet in width, which is too narrow for a box stall 
door. This defect has now been remedied, and carpenters 
were at work last week adding a foot to the width of the 
opening. The stalls are being rapidly taken and by the first 
of next month will be nearly all filled in all probability. 



Several citizens of Vacaville, Solano county, are agitat- 
ing the proposition of building a speed track and organizing 
a driving club solely for the purpose of encouraging the 
breeding and keeping of high class road horses. 



The Occident Stake for 1902 will be a boomer. Secretary 
Shields had received ninety entries in it up to last Tuesday 
and it will take several days for all the returns to come in. 
It will be the richest in the history of the stake. 



Genebal B. F. Tracy has purchased the Minchin and 
Hogan farms near Goshen, N. Y., and will remove bis trot- 
ters from Stony Ford to new quarters after making extensive 
improvements. There are about 160 acres in tne tract. 



The bay gelding Clingstone 2:14, died at Cleveland last 
Thursday. He was by Rvsdyk 653, out of Gretcben, by 
Chonroes 735, second dam Lady|Fallie, by American Star 14. 
He was foaled in 1875 and trotted to a record at Cleveland 
in 1882. 



Smith Shaw, as President of the San Luis Obispo Agri- 
cultural Association, has leased from George W. Long the 
San Luis Obispo race track property for the county fair next 
fall. The association agrees to pay $100 for the use of the 
property, the lease to expire when the races close. 



Within twelve months C. W. Williams has sold 35 year- 
lings by Allerton for an average of $456 each. Allerton is a 
great horse, but Mr. Williams is one of the best advertisers 
in the United States. He keeps Allerton and his get before 
the public and does not overlook any points that will aid the 
Allerton boom. Herein be is wise. 



A new grandstand just finished on the trotting track at 
Moscow, Russia, is the most expensive building of the kind 
in the world. It took the government over two years to 
build it, and it cost $500,000. It is build of stone and brick, 
is a three decker 300 feet long and 150 feet wide; the walls 
are three feet thick and it has a double glass front. 



Jesse D. Carr has sold his rancho Cienege del Gabilan, 
in San Benito county, to Charles and Henry Bardin, of 
Salinas. The ranch comprises 5407 acres, and is appraised 
in the sale at $49,000. In exchange therefor the Bardin 
Bros, transfer the Bardin House, in Salinas, which is valued 
at $40,000 to the Salinas Valley Land Company, of which 
Mr. Carr is the head. 



Ca it. Ben E. Harris is engaged in breaking a two year 
old filly by John Sevenoaks, out of Frona Freeman, by Ad- 
venture, that can lead to baiter as fast as anytbing that goes 
on four legs. She threw her head against the Captain's face 
the other day and made bis lip look as though it belonged to 
one of the deck hands that used to tote freight on bis Mississ- 
ippi rivet steamer forty years ago. Captain Harris is 76 
years old, bat few young men can handle and educate a 
horse as well as he. He says the filly is the greatest one he 
ever owned. 



The widely circulated teport that the well-known Ameri- 
can stallion Baron Rogers 2:09}, recently lowered the four 
mile trotting record to 9:32 in a race at Moscow, Russia, turns 
out to be untrue. The distance trotted by the son of Baron 
Wilkes was six versts, or 120 feet less than four English 
miles. His speed for the distance was greater than any 
trotter has yet shown in Russia or elsewhere, and there can 
be no doubt that if he bad gone on he would have established 
a four mile mark far below the champion mark of 9:58 made 
by Bertie R. 2:12} at Blackpool, England, last fall. 

James Thompson, the well known trainer, disposed of all 
the horses, vehicles, harness, etc., of his Van Ness avenue 
livery stable at auction last Tuesday, Chase & Mendenhall 
acting as auctioneers. A pouring rain fell during the entire 
day, which undoubtedly kept many people away but very 
fair prices were obtained. Mr. Thompson will go to Pleasan- 
ton next week and open a public training stable there. He 
has the fast green mare Monica by McKinney which is con- 
fidently expected to get a low record, and will have another 
green one in his string that will be "a surprise" as he 
terms it. 

Papinta, the well known danseuee, arrived in California 
during the last week of the old year, and went to her stock 
farm near Concord, Contra Costa county, for a month's 
srjourn. She was accompanied on her Eastern tour by her 
husband Mr. W. J. Holpin, who says be got back just in 
time to enter their stallion El Ravo, and several of his get in 
the big California stakes that closed during the first few 
days of the year. Mr. Holpin has a four year old which he 
calls Gladstone, that is a very promising trotter. He is by 
Altamont, sire of six better than 2:10, out of Maggie Arnold 
the dam of Naylox 2:30 and Altago, sire of four in the list, 
next dam Alice Drake (dam of Norman Medium 2:20) by 
Norman 25. 

A new line of work has been established by the Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in a series of 
lectures to be delivered by Prof. E. A. A. Grange at the 
American Horse Exchange, [New York. The society pro- 
poses to educate citizens in all the knowledge appertaining 
to domestic animals and the sort of treatment needed to bring 
out their good points and guarantee fredom from disease and 
pain when possible. Prof. Grange organized the bacterio- 
gical department at the Michigan agricultural college at 
Lansing Mich., and during the latter part of his fifteen years 
connection with the college occupied the chair of Veterinary 
Science. The lectures are illustrated with elides and by the 
aid of several ill used horses brought in for the occasion. 

Secretary Wilson's order of October Cist, relating to 
the veterinary inspection of animals for export, was put into 
effect as regards horses the first of the new year. After in- 
spection only homes free from disease and ehown not to 
have been exposed to contagion will be allowed to be 
shipped. Shippers are required to notify the inspector of 
intended shipments, the number and deetination of cars, and 
shall inform inspectors of the locality from which animals 
have been brought and the name of the breeders. Any 
horses that are offered for shipment which have not been 
inspected and transported in accordance with these regula- 
tions, or are adjudged to be infected or to have been ex- 
posed to infection shall not be allowed to be placed upon 
any vessel for exportation. 



Sweetheart, that trotted at Stockton in September, 1881, 
to a three year old record of 2:22}, a sensational performance 
in those days is still owned by Mr. John W. Mackay, who 
insists that she shall be surrounded with every comfort until 
she dies at the Dey Farm, in Woodford county, Kentucky. 
Her four year old daughter by Stamboul is very fast. Sweet- 
heart is by Sultan out of the famous mare Minnehaha, and 
was bred by the late L J. Rose. 



Harry Brown, who has five young trotters belonging to 
Judge W. E. Greene and two or three owned by Mr. I. L. 
Borden in bis stables on the corner of Second and Harrison 
streets, Oakland, has recently added another to the string. 
This is a two year old colt belonging to the well known vet- 
erinarian, Dr. Btimson of Oakland, and is by a son of Simmi- 
colon. He is a very promising youngster and under Mr. 
Brown's care will very likely develop into a fast one. 



Eo Laffekty moved to Pleasanton this week and has 
seven stalls occupied at that celebrated track. Addison 2:11, 
by James Madison, beads the siring, and he has a green 
pacer by Guy Wilkes 2:15}, out of Wanda 2:14, that belongs 
to Frank H. Burke of this city, and is said to have shown 
all the speed to which it is entitled by its inheritance. 
Laflerty has a colt by Bay Bird that will bear watching. 
He is a handsome fellow and will be a new performer for the 
son of Jay Bird this year unless something unforseen happens. 
In addition to the foregoing there are three royally bred 
young fillies under Mr. Lafferty's care that were purchased 
in Kentucky by Mr. W. E. Lester of this city. They are 
by Kremlin 2:07}, Bow Bills and Allie Wilkes and will get 
their first lessons at the Pleasanton track this month. 



A very amusing case of appeal came up before the 
Board of Appeals at Chicago last month. It was a protest 
relating to an award at a meeting in a northwestern Slate in 
the past season. Two heats in a race had been won by one 
of the drivers. In the third heat another driver drove on 
the track with a great outfit. On the back of his horse, near 
the saddle, he had attached a tin pan, about twenty inches 
in diameter, and fastened a small piece of chain to his whip- 
lash. The possibilities for music and clatter were great aod 
the driver made the most of tbem. Of course, not another 
horse could be brought near him, and the tin-clad horse 
came in first in three heats and was awarded the race by the 
judges over the protests of the contesting drivers. Perhaps 
the judges wanted to see the joke through. The protest 
came before the Board of Review, which reversed the decision 
of the judges. 



Printer's ink judiciously used is bound to briog results, 
and owners ot good stallions can obtain them by presenting 
their claims to the readers of the horse papers. From pres- 
ent indications there will be more bleeding done in 1900 
than has been done in several years. Owners of mares 
should pick the stallions wbo are successful as sires or if 
young horses, thoee that are bred right and have shown 
themselves fast. Another and an important thing to be con- 
sidered, in selecting a etallion to breed to, is the owner. 
There are some men wbo own stallions who never advertise 
them in any way, nor ever make an effort to help their get. 
Consequently the progeny of their horses fail to fetch much 
money in the sale ring, while the progeny of such horses as 
Allerton, Baron Wilkes, etc , sell for fat prices, because their 
owners are liberal in the use of printer's ink, and do every- 
thing to keep their sires before the public. The moral is 
plain. — Chicago Horse Review. 



A. L. McDonald, who drove Who Is It to his three year 
old record of 2:12, was in town this week, having taken the 
opportunity afforded by the rainy weather, of letting the 
colts on Mr. A. G. Gurnett's Walnut Creek Stock Farm 
stand in their stalls for a couple of days. Mr. McDonald has 
broken ten or twelve head during the past few weeks, and 
has a string of five that he will put in active training. He 
has three four year olds by Direct 2:05} that are most prom- 
ising. One of these is the gray gelding What Is It, out of 
Lassie Jean, the dam of Who Is It. There is also a colt out 
of Lady W. that is a big, fine going fellow, and one put of a 
mare by Norfolk that Bhows well. Lassie Jean's two year 
old by the Sidney stallion, St. Nicholas, is a chestnut colt 
and a handsome, well turned fellow tbat can show consider- 
able speed already, though he has only had a harness on a 
few times. The farm's entry in the Pacific Breeders' Futur- 
ity for 1900 is a three year old colt by McKinney 2:11}, out 
of Nellie Fairmont, by Fairmont, son of Piedmont; next daaa 
Nellie, by Whipple's Hambletonian. This colt will be a 
high class trotter if no accident happens him. The track at 
this tarm is an excellent one for working on during the wet 
weather, as it is sandy and dries out in a few days. Mr. 
McDonald will move his string to the Pleasanton track 
about the middle of March and feels confident he will place 
several of them low down in the standard list before the 
season is over. 



E. F. Geers has sold to C. J. and Harry Hamlin, pro- 
prietors of the Vitiate Farm, East Aurora. N. Y., his three 
year old pacing colt Direct Hal, by Direct 2:05}, dam Bessie 
Hal, by Tom Hal, for the magnificent sum of $10,000. I 
doubt if the his'ory of the pacing horse records a more sen- 
sational sale. JuBt think of it ! A three year old untried 
pacer selling for $10,000. Surely our friend Trotwood can 
sing the Nunc dimittis now. Direct Hal is a black colt and 
was bred by Ed Geers. The winter Geers shipped the Vil- 
lage Farm stable to California, Be-sie Hal was taken along, 
and while there she was bred to Direct 2:05}, a horse Geers 
greatly admired from the time of his great duels with Hal 
Pointer. Direct Hal was broken and trained a little as a two 
year old. When the Village Farm stable reached Louisville 
this fall the colt joined the Geers forces, and with a few 
weeks training stepped a mile in 2:17. Owing to the ship- 
ment of the stable to the home farm his training was discon- 
tinued, but Geers believed the colt would have paced in 2:12 
the week following had his training been continued. When 
the stable reached the covered track stories of the great speed 
shown by the youngster floated through the air. Mr. C. J. 
Hamlin was greatly pleased with the youngster, and for sev- 
eral weeks has been trying to obtain a price on bim. Satur- 
day, December 23d, Mr. Hamlin visited the covered track, and 
after seeing the colt step, offered, in the presence of a dczsn 
people, a check for $10,000 for the son of Direct, which Geers 
accepted. The colt will be raced with the Village Farm 
stable next season. Bewie Hal, I believe, is again in foal to 
"the little black rascal."— Gerald Rex in Am. Horse Breeder. 



January 6, 1900] 




Darebin Succeeds in Both Lines. 



Last week four broodmares by imp. Darebin brought such 
ample prices as $3250, $2200 and $1500 in a single Fale, all 
of which is surely an evidence that their worth as producers 
is beginning to be properly appreciated, writes W. H. Rowe 
in the N. Y. Telegraph of Dec. 27th. Surely it would be 
strange were it not so, for a single such jewel as Mesmerist i 9 
alone quite enough to bring any horse into the height^ of 
fashion as a sire of broodmares, to say nothing of the many 
really good class winners already to his credit. 

In the male line Darebin's hopes hereabouts have for some 
time rested upon Ludwig, who has stood at Messrs. Guideon 
& Daly's Holmdel Farm. To be sure it would hardly be ex- 
pected that any Melbourne horse would be preferred to such 
a Stockwell horse as His Highness, and doubtless the Holm- 
del fortunes have been best served by the priority being 
given to the sire of Jean Beraud, His Royal Highness, High 
Degree, Neda and Affect. But Ludwig was such a smasher 
during his brief turf career that one cannot help wondering 
what would happen it the right mares were found for him, 
especially as he represents such a strong trebling of Mel- 
bourne in the male line. 

He is himself by Darebin, he by The Peer, an own son of 
Melbourne, while his dam, Bavaria, is by Spendthrift out of 
imp. Piccadilly, and both of these latter were descended just 
as closely from Melbourne in the male line as is Ludwig 
himself. Then, too, Piccadilly's dam was by Blair Atholi 
he out of Blink Bonny, by Melbourne. Horses bred like 
this are apt to be difficult to suit in the stud, judicious in_ 
breeding to one or more side lines being obviously the best 
course, of which we find an illustration in the fact that Lud- 
wig has done his best, in bis limited career at Holmdel 
with Tarantella, a daughter of The Ill-Used, he by Breadal- 
bane, brother to Blair Atbol, the alliance also bringing in- 
breeding to Lexington in five free generations. Royal 
Purple, a full sister to Ludwig, was among the broodmares 
sold the other night, and from Bruce Lowe's book, to say 
nothing of Vampire's succees with Orme in England, we 
know i hat a mare bred like this might well throw a phenom- 
enal horse to a stallion whose dam would hit off strongly her 
inbred blood, if he himself comes from an appropriate male 
line. 

All this is the more interesting and important when we 
find that Darebin has scored a notable success in the male line 
in Australia, thtough his son, The Australian Peer, who was 
gotten there by Darebin before bis purchase by Mr. Haggin- 
The Australian Peer amply proved his race course prowess 
by winning such races as the Victoria Derby and Svdney 
Cup, in the former defeating Abercorn, and now we find him 
represented by a smashing good eon in Australian Star, who 
cams out the weight forage hero of the recent V. A. T. C. 
Meeting, and has been sold to Mr. S. H. Gollan for some 
£3000, it being the purchaser's intention to race the colt in 
England in 1900. His former owner, Mr. A. Gollan, who is 
no relation of the purchaser, took things easy with "the 
Star" as a juvenile, which he could well afford to do, as his 
original cost was only 30 guineas, and to this fact is no doubt 
due not a little of the colt's brilliancy as a three year old. 
I read of him as being a black colt out of Colors, she by 
Grandmaster out of Red and Black, she by Exminster out of 
Wild Fire by Wild Oats. They have a good lot of three 
year olds in Australia this year, so Australian Star may be 
worth watching if he gets to England all right. 



"Well, that's all right. Then conies another batch of 
yearlings to the same sale paddocks from a different part of 
the country, from an altogether different climate. So there 
they are, from Maine to California as thev call it, all hud- 
dled in different stalls in one paddock. 

"And what's the result? More or less sicknesB is bound 
to ensue. It does not develop at once, of course, but the 
germs are there, for a young horse is extremely susceptible 
to sickness under there conditions. 

"The purchases are made and the yearlings are shipped to 
their purchasers' quarters at some of the race tracks, where 
older horses and good horses are in training condition and 
tbey get the infection, which is generally distemper. 

"The 'vete,' who always have a wise word for anything a 
horse is troubled with, call it 'epizootic,' or something not 
half as intelligible. But I tell you it is nothing but dis- 
temper, and it is so infectious and so hurtful to old horses 
that I would not be surprised some day to see every horse at 
some race track down with it at one lime and the racing have 
to stop. 

"I take this view of the case from having passed my life- 
time with horses. I have studied the matter for some time 
and I ought to Know something about it. 

"The remedy is simple enough, and some day you will see 
racing men beginning to employ it. It ia not the fault of 
the yearlings. They are just like children, and will get 
sick. Let the owners take their youngsters away from the 
racetracks, and if they get sick let them have that privilege. 
But let it be by themselves away from the old horses, where 
they can do no harm. 

"An old horse, like a full grown mm, has twice the 
trouble with mumps or scarlet fever as a kid, and I think it 
is a shame to subject a matured horse to the chance of being 
made sick by contact with a promiscuous lot of yearlings. 

"The superintendents at the various tracks could play a 
strong hand in this if they would forbid absolutely the quar- 
tering of yearlings on their tracks during the racing season. 
They better look out, or they'll have a wheezy little yearling 
coming in some day and giving the Coacomacs, Blhelberts, 
Imps and other great racehorses sickness and breaking up 
the racing for the meeting." 



Empire Oity Track for Runners. 



Do YearllDas Spread Distemper ? 



Those who are best acquainted with the circumstances of 
the building of the Empire City trotting track at New York 
have always claimed that it would eventually be turned over 
to one of the jockey c'ubs and be principally devoted to the 
running brigade. That this may be done in the near future 
is more than probable, as the following from the New York 
Telegraph will show: 

"The Empire City track has been the subject of much 
comment among turfmen and racegoers. It is no longer a 
secret that the rapid strides of improvement have made it 
impossible to retain the grounds of the Westchester Racing 
Association for race tiack purposes. Surveys have already 
been made and plans arranged to cut streets through Morri 8 
Park. This magnificent racing property is extremely de- 
sirable to the Jockey Club, which practically controls and 
manages all the meetings held there. The splendid club- 
house, superb lawns and conveniences make it especially de- 
sirable, as the clubhouse inclosure is rapidly becoming 
attractive to society. Turfmen mourn the fact that it will 
be impossible to retain the grounds at Westchester and that 
the scene must shift to some other track. Proposition have 
already been made by the owners of the Empire City track 
to leaee that property on reasonable terms should events 
hasten the close of Morris Park. The Empire City track is 
a mile in circumference, with long, wide stretches, and the 
turns graded in such a manner that the speed of the horses 
is not greatly retarded in making them. It would not be an 
unwise or uncertain prediction to state that the Empire City 
track is likely to be controlled by the Jockey Club before 
another year rolls around. In regard to the transportation 
facilities to and from the Empire track, it ia reasonably cer- 
tain that arrangements are completed with the New York 
Central Railroad to put in a line of double track and a 
sufficient number of switches to make the Empire City track 
one of the most convenient and easy of approach of any of 
the tracks in the neighborhood of New York." 



Sza Lion, the crack performer from the Schorr stable, 
started in a sprint race on Wednesday and gave strong indi- 
cations that be is nearly due to win. The animal which has 
been on the sick list for a long time is commencing to re- 
cover his form and with continued improvement will soon 
be a hard proposition to defeat. 

On Wednesday Barney 8chreiber started a filly by Foul 
Shot in a maiden three year old race and captured the coin 
in the easiest possible manner. This was one cf the good 
things that went through, and from the numbers in line be- 
hind the bookmakers' boxes it seemed as if everyone present 
at the track had a bet on the winner. 

Meddler made his first appearance over the sticks ard 
ran a fairly eood race for a new performer; he dwells too 
long at the jtimp9 and consequently loses ground; when this 
fault is remedied he will develop i.ito one of the greatest 
hurdle jumpers in the country, as he is certainly able to out- 
sprint anything else now competing in the game. 

Potente, the bay son of Racine and Pow Pow, has dem- 
onstrated that he is possessed of some class; in the race which 
he won at Oakland last week he ran a remarkably fast mile, 
with light weight up. On New Year's Dav, however, he 
shouldered 108 pounds and conceding weight to a field of 
fair class aged performers, galloped over them and won very 
easily. 

That the most astute horsemen are not. infallible, and may 
be as liable to error as tbe gullible public, was well illus- 
trated last Wednesday when Mr. Corrigan scratched St. Cas- 
simer and bet several hundred dollars on Hunello, who was 
supposed to hold the race safe with the Corrigan entry in tbe 
stable, but who finished last in a field of five after showing a 
burst of speed for the first quarter. 

A measure of wholesome discipline in the shape of a 
stiff fine should have been administered to Jockey Bullman 
for his criminal carelessness in allowing Bannockburn to be 
beaten after having the race well in hand There is a rule 
bearing on this subject which states that "jockeys must ride 
their horses out at the finish," and it is the duty of the 
judges to see that it is enforced. 

Nick Hall's colors were seen to finish in front for the 
first time in many moons on a California track, his four year 
old gelding Facade winning in a desperate drive from 
Wallenstein owing to tbe superior horsemanship of Jockey 
Bullman. This winner was well backed at sixes bv Charlie 
Fair, who made a handsome winning over his victory in the 
profits of which Mr. Hall is said to have a share. 

The racing season of 1900 waB opened at Tanforan Park 
on Monday last and despite the heavy downpour of rain one 
of the largest crowds of the season was in attendance; in fact, 
the railroad facilities for handling the spectators were in- 
adequate for such a large gathering. The betting ring was 
uncomfortably crowded and but fourteen books being in line, 
the bookmakers were kept very busy in accommodating their 
customers. 

Jocks. Y8 Burns and Songer were suspended by the Board 
of Stewards of the California Jockey Club on the closing 
dav of their meeting. Songer is charged with having been 
left at the post intentionally on Scotch Plaid and also of 
putting up a rather suspicious ride on Red Pirate. Burns 
was indefinitely suspended for insubordination, having re- 
fused to accept the mount on Sly after being duly engaged, 
which necessitated the scratchingof Sly at the eleventh hour. 



Little Zoroaster made his reappearance on Tueedav and 
went to the post favorite in the mile puise race, although 
conceding weight to everything in the race. He received a 
rUher ill-judged ride at the hands of Jockey Spencer, who 
was cut off and interfered with several limes but finally got 
through the bunch in the stretch and making his run too late 
was unable to get up and was beaten by Malav and Macato 
in a most exciting finish, tbe three contenders finishing 
heads apart. 

On Tuesday Mr. Corrigan started Vassal for the first time 
since 1896 and the old horse won in a gallop over a distance 
of six furlongs defeating a fairlv good field. In his three 
year old form Vassal was a high class performer and ran a 
rr ile and a quarter at Washington Park in 2:05}, besides 
winning some twelve or fourteen races at other distances. 
8hould the horse train on he ^ill doubtless make a very use- 
ful member of the string which Mr. Corrigan intends ship- 
ping to England next season. 



Horso 



Owners Should Use 
GOMBAULT'S 



The 



Col. William Scully, the well known turfman, thinks no 
yearlings should be allowed stall room on race tracks and sets 
forth his reasons as follows : 

"The subject of yearlings to a racing man is of in- 
terest. The young ones are bred cn the best lines available 
to the breeder, who brood? over the stud book in selecting 
the best families to breed from, and his help do all they can 
to assist him, for the smallest lad on a stud farm is as proud 
of the yearlings as the proprietor himself. The young horse 
is brought to the market after the great care that has been 
taken to breed him an aristocrat and to rear him in proper 
style, and after he has been housed in a sales paddock the 
interest in him has just commenced. His history, you might 
say, is just beginning. 

"The buyer comes along with his money (for they have 
got plenty of money around New York to buy yearlings) and 
the youngster is looked over by his would-be purchaser and 
his trainer several days before the sale while his pedigree, 
which has been published in the papers, is being discussed 
and every strain of his blood is being analyzed. 



SADDLE NOTE3. 



Caustic 
Balsam 

Great French Veterinary Remedy. 

A SAFE, SPEEDY AND 
POSITIVE CURE. 



Ipaline, a three year old filly by Clieviden, the propertv 
of Mr. Sink, made her first appearance and showed bo h 
speed and gameness, finishing second to Vassal. It is safe to 
predict that Bhe will not remain long in tbe maiden class. 

The last day at Oakland was a good one for Dr. Rowel), 
who annexed three purses with Imperious, Dr. Bernays and 
Sybaris. This is the second occasion this season when the 
Doctor has won with the same three horses on the same day. 

Whitcomb struck himself in the mile race, stopping 
badly in consequence and finishing outside the money. The 
horse was bleeding freely and Dr. Howell was at first of the 
opinion that a tendon was severed but on examination the 
injury proved to be nothing more serious than a deep cut. 

White Fekn was given the overlook by the public in the 
seven furlong event and the books layed sixes about her 
chances. On the strength of her last race over the Oakland 
track she was entitled to favoritism in the rather ordinary 
field to which she appeared, and which she defeated in the 
easiest possible manner. 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OR FIRING 

Impossible to produce any scar or blemish. The 
saf«8t best Blister ever used. Takes the i>1bc» 
"n'tl liniimm ts for mild or sovnre action, Removes 
ul ! Bunches or Blemishes from IlorBes or Cattle. 

As a HUMAN REMEDY for Rheumatis n. 
Sprains, Sore Throat, Ltc, ltisinvuluuble. 
ujr riltDlllTrt that one ti blesponnfnl of 
WE UUAKANItt CAUSTV BALSAM will 
produce more actual results than iwhole bottle of 
liny liniment or spavin cure miitu ever made. 

Every bottle of Caustic. Ba'jam sold Is ^'ar. an- 
ted to live satisfaction, l'ricp P. .50 per bottle. Hotel 
by druKiiists. or sent byexpros charges paid, with lull 
directions for it« use. Send lor descriptive circ liars, 
testimonials, et«QAddress 

THE LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS CO.. Cleveland, Ohio 



8 



[January 6, 1900 



The 2:30 List for 1899. 



The following lilt cocUins the names of the Dew standard performers of the year 
and those previously in the list that have reduced their records, that were sired by 
stallion? bred or owned in California or that have stood for service in this State. The 
names of the sires are printed in capital letters, with their registered number and record 
following, then the figures representing the number of standard trotters and pacers sired 
by them, if any, up to the close of 189rf. 



ABBOTT** FORD 707, 2:19^—11, 2 p. 

Fred Hale, ch g 2:25 

Happy F.ird (p), ch g 2:19(4 

Dohrnaan, br g 2:I8S to 2:17* 

Jim Crow, blk g 2:18K to 2:17* 

ADVEttTISER 17152, 2:16)4— 3. 1 p. 

Everard (p), blk h. 2:19* 

ALBERT W. 1 1333. 2:20-13, 8 p. 

Amelia (p) b m 2:17)4 to 2:16* 

Wyreka(p) b h 2:22)4 to 2:18)4 

ALCAZ AR 51U2 2:20^-4—12. 

Quinton, b h 2:29)4 to 2:19)4 

ALEXANDER BU TTON 1997, 2:16)4— 14, 6 p. 

Vllerla (pi b m 2:19 

ALFRED I*. 12452, 2:19* -9, 5 p. 

EffleG ,bm 2:19* 

Gem (p), b m 2:21!4 

Katie A. (p), b m 2:18(4 

Charley Herr, br h 2:13(4 to2:'0 

Ella H., b m 2 :24)4 to 2:19)4 

Etbel U. ip) b m 2:19)4 to km* 

Timberlake, b h 2:21),, to 2:19* 

ALT AM iNT 3600, 2:26* -26, 15 p. 

Alameda, b m 2:13 

May lilden, b m 2:19V 

Carries (p),bm 2:22)., to 2:17)4 

Deceiver (p) b g 2:17>4 to 2:17 

ANTEEO 7888, 2:16)4-34. 

Antezella, b h 2:16"4 

Arcbduke, b h 2:27)4 

Bettlne b b 2:22* 

Faris, bg 2:12(4 

Owego.bg 2:26)4 

Anteeo llelle. b m 2:27)4 to 2:23 

Millard Sanders, b h 2:27)4 to 2:18)4 

Myrtle, b m 2:19)4 to 2:13>£ 

ANTKEO, JR 22372,2:26)4-1. 

Maud, ro m 2:17)4 

ANTEKOLO 13130. 

Dave Ryan (p) b h 2:17* to 2:13 

ANTE KOS 6020-15, 9 p. 

Lucy Belle, b m 2:29)4 

Morrill McKenzle (p) b h 2:21)4 

Duros.bg 2:23)4 to 2:23 

AN I INOUS 4T78, 2:28)4—2. 

Tip Tinous, br m 2:29)4 

ARION 18000,2:0754—5. 

Melro.bg 2:29)4 

Hpera, br m 2:22)4 

Elision, b m 2:19(4 to 2:17 

Loma, b m 2:19)4 to 2:17)4 

ATH A D N 20990, 2 :27-l. 

Listerine. b m 2:17)4 

ATTO REX 6821, 2:21*-S, 1 P- 

Bessie Rex, blk m 2:26)4 

Midget, b m 2:25-4 

Keglna F., b m 2:21* 

BAY ROSE 9814, 2:20^-2. 

< olooel K.K., bb 2:22)4 to 2:19* 

BAYS %VATER WILKES, by Sable Wilkes 8100. 

Kelly Brlggs (p). b g 2:10)4 

BEAU BRUMMELL (p). 2:16)4. 

Vallta (p), b m 2:24 

BELL BOY 5350. 2:19)4—10 p. 

Lady Bell (p) b m 2:19)4 

Mapie Bells, b b 2:18 

ISEKN.5 L 13168, 2:17-1. 

Berwyn, b g 2:21)4 

BILLY TH'iRNHILL 8707, 2:24)4-5. 

Ned Thorn, o g 2:18 to 2:16(4 

BINOEN 29567, 2:06)4. 

Blngen, Jr., b b 2:27)4 

BONNER N. B., 24270, 2:17. 

Phil N. B , b g _ 2:29 

BOW BELLS 13073, 2:19-4— 10 -4 p. 

Bel Esprit, b g 2:12(< 

Billy A idrews (p) b h 2:06-4 

Bow Sebastian (p) b h 2:23)4 

8. P.,bg 2:30 

Lord Titan, br h 2:29)4 

Wilkes Belle, br m 2:17)4 to 2:14)4 

BOXWOOD, by Nutwood 600-1. 

MIODle B, blk m 2:25)4 to 2:15)4 

BOY DELL 5.191 —2. 

Cydell, b m 2:29)4 

CAMPAIGN 8811—1. 

Electropalgn, b b 2:23)4 to 2:23)4 

CANDIDATE 13113, 2:26)4— «. 

Pascola. br m _ 2:21)4 

CECILIAN 17563, 2:22—1. 

Bebave. ch g 2:28)4 

Besiege, bg 2:22)4 

Carnage, b g 2:23 s 

Endow, b g 2:14* 

CHARLES DERBY 4907, 2 20-3, 6 p. 

Derby Lass, blk m 2:14 

Sally Derby, b m 2:26)4 

Owyhee, b b 2:23* to 2:11 

CHIMES 5348-30, 13 p. 

Dorlnda. b m 2:22)4 

E. 8. E. (p',. br h..„ _2:21!4 

George H. Ray, b g 2:28)4 

erry Chimes ip), o h 2:22)4 

May Belle I'blmes, b m 2:28)4 



Prospect Chimes, blk b 2:10 

The Queen, blk m 2:10)4 

King Cbimrs (p). bg 2:13)4 to 2:10* 

Tne Abbot, b g 2:08 to 2:06)4 

CONDUCTOR 12256, 2:14*-6, 1 p. 

Fra-cati, g m 2:25)4 

Tickets, bg 2:17)4 

M M. D. tp), b m 2:22)4 

Carey C, g b. „ 2:2T)4 to 2:25)4 

CONRAD 5381—1. 

Zeluat, b b 2:30 to 2:21)4 

CUPID (p) 2:18. 

Lottie rams, bm 2:16* 

Psyche, cb m 2:17)4 

VenUB II., b m 2:11)4 

DALY 5341, 2:16. 

Daly Moor, br m 2:28)4 

DEX l'KR PRINCE 11633-34, 12 p. 

Cherok.e Prince (p), ch h 2:22)4 to 2:18 

Lucrativa, b m 2:26)4 to 2:14)4 

DIABLO 11404 (p),2:09*-3 p. 

Clipper tp),bg .. 2:09* 

Daedallon (p), b b 2:11 

El Diablo, cb h 2:16 

C4afl Topsail (p), ch h 2:17)4 

N. L. B. (p), cb h 2:21)4 

Key Del Diablo (p),ch h 2:23* 

Dlawood (p), cb b 2:14)4 to 2:11 

DICTATUS 2)306 tp) 2:19)4—1 p. 

Dictatreas (p), cb m 2:18)4 to 2:12)4 

DIRECT 241l>, 2:18)4 (p), 2:05)4—7, 8. 

Corona, blk m 7:27)4 

I alvln, blk li 2:29)4 

De Veras (p), blk h „ 2:16* 

Miss Kate, bm 2:21 to 2:15)4 

DIRECTION 16149 (p), 2:08)4-1 p. 

Garibaldi (p), b b 2:18)4 

DIRECT LINE 22117. 

Marion Maid (p) 2:22)4 

DI REC I OR 1989, 2:17—31, 11 p. 

Delphi (p), b b 2:16 to 2:13)4 

DON LOWELL, 2:14)4. 

Dorado, b m 2:22)4 

DON MARVIN 7929, 2:22)4— 3. 

Elevator, b g 2:30 

DURFEE 11236-2 p. 

Sid Durfee, b g . 2:28)4 

Shecan, b g 2:18)4 to 2:14)i 

EGOTIST 501S, 2:22)4 - 26, 3 p. 

Crosspalcb, b m 2:25 

Du.beas, br m 2:27)4 

Gold Falka, cb m 2:26)4 

Virginia, b m 2:23)4 

ELECTEEO 23036, 2:29)4—1. 

FoasieO., gm 2:25 to 2:19)4 

ELECTION 6217— 2. 1 p. 

Alice Barnes, b m 2:22)4 to 2:13)4 

Matt e Young, b m 2:26)4 to 2:18)4 

ELECTION BEL 19833. 

Echo Bell, br g _ 2:25)4 

ELEC HONKER 125—156, 2. 

Princess, b m. . 2:27)4 

Belsire, b b 2:28)4 to 2:21)4 

EL EC TIONEER 11671,2:17*— 3, 1 p. 

Lizzie S. (p), cb m. 2:21)4 

ELECTOR H. 17924, 2 :26-l p. 

Rose H. (p>, brm 2:19)4 

ELECiRIC BELL 10529. 

Battel, brh 2:21)4 

Cardenla, b g „ 2:26)4 

ELECTRICIAN 5007, 2:24)4-1 p. 

Electrimont (pi. b h 2:21)4 

ELECTRICITY 5344, 2:17*— 11. 

spark (pi, brm 2:19)4 

Surpal.g h 2:15* to 2:10 

ELECTRITE 10878, 2:28)4 —21, It p. 

Olga Electrlte, br m...._ 1:27)4 

Rose Electrlte (p;, b m 2:22)4 

William McKeuzle (p) blk g 2:21)4 

Bloodle. ch g 2:19* to 2:13)4 

Elrod (p), bg 2:24)4 to 2:13)4 

ELECTROTYPE 9006—3, 1 p. 

Election Time (p) b h.. 2:16)4 to 2:15)4 

ELECT WOOD 17001,2:29)4-3. 

Cbarley Stiles, b g. 2:21!4 

Electwav-- (p).b h 2:21* 

Wbeaton Boy, br h 2:25-4 to 2:25)4 

EROS 2674. 

Go Ahead (pi br h „ « 2:22)4 

EXPEDITION 14900,12:15*— 7. 

Escobar, brb -2:15)4 

hxllncl, br h „ 2:28 

FALLIS 4871, 2:23-10, I p. 

Lottie Kallis br m 2:22)4 to 2:20)4 

FALMONT 21419, 2:14)4. 

Lady Ruth, b m 2:29)4 

FALROSE 12598 (p), 2:19—2 p. 

Lady Falrose (p), b m 2:21 

Don tt ), b g. 2.15 to 2:10 

Primrose (p) b m.. 2:14)4 to 2:18 

GENERAL LOGAN 17604,2:23)4—1 p. 

Mlsa Logan (p)„. 2:07 (4 to 2:06)4 

GOV. STANFORD 5620, 2:21—1, 1 p. 

Arbitrate (p), ch g 2:24)4 to2:23 



GKOVER CLAY, 2:23)4— 1. 

Clay 8 , blk b 2:21to2:13* 

GUY CORBE I T 11726— 1. 

Twlllmo, b h 2:26)4 to 2:17* 

GUY KOHL 10724-1 p. 

Genevieve, br m 2:25)4 

GUY WILKES 2867, 2:15)4— 51, » p. 

Cascade (p), blk h 2:14* 

Goodman, b g 2:26)4 

Guycara, b m 2:18* 

Guyson, ch h. 2:24 

Roselle R , b m „ 2:26)4 

Dollade w likes, blk m 2:19)4 to 2:12)4 

Fred Kohl, blk h 2:12)4 to 2:07* 

Ouyon, ch b. 2.25 to 2:24)4 

Raven Wilkes, blk h 2:18)4 to 2:15)4 

HAMBLETONIAN WILKES 1679-9, 8 p. 

Brown Bess (p), br m 2:24* 

Sybil 8.. b m 2:16* 

HUMMER6I12-3, 4 p. 

Disarm, b g 2:24!4 

Head, b m _ 2:24)4 

Bouncer, b m 2:10 to 2:09 

ILLUSTRIOUS 4178 , 2:29(«. 

Eleanor Ann, b m 2:19)4 

IRA 13837, 2:24 -»— 3. 

Iora, b m 2:14 to 2:11)4 

IRAN ALTO 24S86, 2:12)4—1. 

Dr. Frasse's >lster, b m 2:25)4 

Dr. Frasse, b g 2:18* to 2:12)4 

JAMES MADISON 17909, 2:I7«-S, 1 p. 

Belle Madison, br m - 2:26)4 

Domino (p), br g 2:16)4 

Harry Madison, br g 2:27)4 

Addison, g g 2:18)4 to2:li)4 

El.en Madison, bm 2:19)4 to 2:12)4 

J. C. SIMPSON 21246. 2:18)4. 

Sally Simpson (p).bra 2:21* 

JUD WILKES 22821, 2:26*— 1. 

Galelle, blk m .2:12)4 to 2:12 

KNIGHT 10557, 2:22)4-1 p. 

Countess Knlgbt (p), ch m. 2:18-4 

Anaconda IP), b g 2:04)4 to 2:03)4 

LEGAL TEST 16036, 2:29*— 1. 

Carrie Sblelis, ch m 2:29)4 to 2:13)4 

LONGWOR I H 18152 (p), 2:19. 

El Moro, blk g 2:17 

LOTTERY TICKET 20247,2:26. 

Lottie Lilac, b m 2:23)4 

Lottery T., b h 2:29), to2:26 l 4 

LYNMONT 21842, 2:23)4 -8. 

Lena A., b m. 2:21)4 

McKiNNEY 8818, 2:11)4—10, 4 p. 

i oney (p), blk g 2:07* 

Dr. Book, b g 2:13* 

Eula Mac, b m 2:27)4 

McNally, br g 2:19)4 

Miss Barnabee, br m 2:21 

Mowitza, b m 2:20"4 

Jenny Mac (p), bm ^2:12 to 2:09 

Solo, b m _ 2:25* to 2:23 

MAMBRINO WILKES 6085—9, 5 p. 

Dr. Hardy, br h 2:27)4 

MAY BOY 3261, 2:23*-2, 1 p. 

May Boy Jr. ip), gr h 2:19)4 

Mavflower (p), b m 2:23(4 

MAY KI HQ 10272—6. 

Allle King, chg 2:20)4 to 2:19)4 

Bingen, b b 2:06* to 2:06)4 

Chestnut King, ch h 2:17)4 to 2:18)4 

Genevieve, ch m 2.16'4 to 2:13)4 

Pie Lljero (p), ch h 2:24)4 to 2:11* 

MENDOCINO 22H07, 2:19)4-1. 

Idolita, bh 2:21)4 to 2:12 

MILROI 20385—2. 

Kerolite, bg 2:15)4 

NEERNUT 19810, 2:12)4—1. Kis 

Neeratta, blk m 2:16* to 2:11)4 

NORRIS 17569, 2:22)4—3. 

Lunda, b m 2-28)4 to 2:26)4 

NOR VA L 5335, 2:14*-34, 11 p. 

Boreas, b g _ 2:28)4 

Ceremony, br m 2:26)4 

Norlie, br m.; 2:26)4 

Norval M. (p), b g 2:22)4 

Norval Red.bg 2:21-4 

Ni.rvetta, b m 2:21)4 

Rex (p), bg 2:24)4 

Sallle Pepper, b m i 2:24!4 

Spring Boy (p). b g 2:15!4 

Annie Leyburn (p), b m. 2:1714 to 2:15)4 

Donnogu (p), b h 2:12* to 2:10)4 

Flowing Tide (pi ch m 2:18)4 to 2:11)4 

KlngNorval.bg 2:29 to 2:24-4 

Margaret Smith, ch m 2:29)4 to 2:20 

Norvln O. (p), brg 2:10)4 to 2:09)4 

NUTWOOD 600, 2:18*-128, 37 p. 

Actuary ip), br h 2:20)4 

Buttonwood, ch h 2:29* to 2:17 

Hickory Knott, b h 2:29)4 

Kitty Connors ipj. b m 2.23)4 

Macwood, ch b \ 2:29)4 

Miss So So, b m 2:24(4 

Noured 'iu.ch h 2:27)4 

Preceptor, ch h 2:28 

Starboard (P),bg .2:24)4 

Tllicum (p). br h 2:19-4 

Allawood (p). b g 2:20-4 to 2:18(4 

Rex Nutwood (pi, bg 2:24)4 to 2:23!4 

NUTWOOD WILKES 22116, 2:16)4-6, 1 p. 

Allx B.. bm _ ..... 2:24)4 

Ecbora Belle (p), b m 2:18*4 

Who Is It, gr g 2:12 to 2:10)4 

PALO ALTO 5353,2:08*-12 t. 

Iran Alto -! ..2:13* it. 2:12 , 

PAOLA, 2:18. 

Preclta, b m 2:28 

PEDLAR 12908, 2:18-4—1. 

Oudray, b g 2:21)4 



PIEDMONT 904. 2:17)4 —21, 2 p. 

Bonnie E., b m 2*29* 

Esparto Rex b h ......2:21 to 2 15^ 

PLEAS ANTON 13362. m 
Pleasanlwood. b h 2-24U 

RAJAH 10154,2:29)4 — 1. " 
Our Lucky, b g 2:16)4 to 2 :18V 

RE-ELECTION 13219,2:27)4—2. 

Amu Rose, gr m 2:24)4 

H. M C. (p), ro g 2:22 

Pa-elected, b h „ 2:28)4 

Zeus, rog 2:30 to 2:23)4 

ROBIN, by Live Oak Hero. 

Roblet (pi, b m 2-12 

SABLE GUY 11552. 

Lucille, b m 2:20)4 

Vervlan, b m. 2:28)4 

SABLEHUR8T, 2:28)4— 2. 

Etelka Maid, blk m 2:27'4 to 2-19)4 

SABLE WILKES 8100. 2:18— 27, 2 p. 

Lord Harford, blk b 2:23)4 

Sable Legrand (p), brg 2:17)4 

Savant (p), br h 2:21(« 

Anita 8., brm 2:23)4 to2:2o)« 

Kdltb Rowe Graham b m 2:24 to 2:17* 

Kenned (p), b h 2:19)4 to 2:17)4 

ST. BEL 5336. 2:24)4 - 41, 8 p. 

Fall Not, br h 2:21)4 

uipsey Bel, b m 2:30 

Locknager, blk g 2:23 

Waverly Bel. br h 2:29)4 

Be) Onward, blk m 2:23 to 2:19* 

Walter H. (Belzoui), b g 2:30 to2:18* 

SAN DIEGO 8776,-1. 

Lottie, brm 2:26)4 to 2:16)4 

SAN TA CLAUS 2000, 2:17(4—12, 3 p. 

Captain Wayne, b b 2-22)4 

SECRETARY 28878, 4-1 p- 

Hazel Y., blk m 2-17 

SENATOR ROSE 22344, 2:18—3. 

B~rtb&Lee, blk m 2:23)4 to 2:13)4 

SIDNEY 4770 (p), 2:19*, 48—33 p. 

Charlev Bennett (p), b h 2:23 

Jack Sidney, ch g 2:29)4 

Kitty R., b m .._ _ 2:27)4 

Lee J., b g „ 2:24)4 

Little Belle, br m . 2:23)4 

Romea (pi, ch m „. w 2-24)4 

Sid Sco t (p) , b g 2:19)4 

Sidney Prince, bb _ 2:24* 

Velvet Bud, b m _ 2:26)4 

Dr. Leek, ch g 2:11)4 to 2:09)4 

Maxle Sidney (|>), b m 2:19)4 to 2:13)4 

Vlgny. b m 2:27)4 to 2:26* 

SIDNEY DILLON 23157-1. 

Dolly D., b m 2:21 to 2:19)4 

8ILKWO0D 12326 (p), 2:07-1, 4 p. 

Blark Babe (p), blk h 2:28 

Beechwood, br m. 2:14 to 2.10)4 

SILVER BOW 11708,2:16-6. 

Lady G., b m 2:27 

SIMMOCOLON 14846, 2:13*-1, 4 p. 

Jim Kilburn (p), ro g 2:18)4 

Willow, blk g 2:23)4 

SON OF A. W. RICHMOND 1687. 

Richland, b g 2:15)4 

SPHINX 5343, 2:20)4—43, 16 p. 

Br»odywlne, gr h 2:20)4 

Cap:aln Sphinx p),bg _ 2:21)4 

Don Sphinx, b h 2:28)4 

Sphinx Lassie, b m 2:29)4 

Sphinx s. (p), b g 2:09)4 

Queen Sphinx, b m 2:27)4 

Uunsaulus, b h 2:16(4 to 2:14)4 

Hazel Ridge, cb h 2:18)4 to 2:11)4 

STAMBOUL 6101, 2:07)4 -37. 

Anheuser, b g 2:20(4 

Electraboui, b h . 2:27 

Gulnare, b m 2:28)4 

Abdul Ameer, bb 2:30 to 2:19(4 

Ellert.bg 2:19 to 2:11)4 

STANFORD 10968, 2:26)4 ->, 2 p. 

Maggie Stanford (o), b m 2:24)4 

STEIN WAY 1808, 2:25* — 12, 17 p. 

King Cadtza (p). b g 2:20 

Ma<icai> (p), b m „ 2:20)4 

Prince Away (p). be 2:22 

SULTAN 1518, 2:24 -40, 5 p. 

Al Sultan (p), br h 2:19)4 

Handy, b h 2:22(4 

Jakie Einstein (p), brb _ 2:21)4 

Rhorii (pi. b g _ 2:22(4 

Bllver Clip, b b 2:27* 

Lord r-ultan, b h 2:18)4 to 2:10)4 

VALENSIN 12019.2:23-1, 1 p. 

Valensin Boy, b g _. 2:27)4 

VASI O 20072 (p), 2:16)4. 

Hank, b g... 2:28 

WALDsTEIN 12597, 2:22)4-4, 3 p. 

Hiram H. <p), b h „ 2:24)4 

California Maid <p) 2:24)4 

WAYLAND W.. 22516, 2:12)4—1 p. 

John A. (p). b b 2:14 

Arthur W. (p), b h 2:15)4 to 2:11)4 

WHIPS 13407. 2:27)4—7. 

Myrtha Whips, b m 2:10* 

WILD BOY 6391-2. 

Oscar, b g 2:20)4 

WILONUT 18172—5. 1 p. 

Mamie W.. b m 2:17)4 

Wild utllng (p) b b 2:13 

Wild Wind, br b „ 2:27)4 

WILKESDALE 4511, 2:29-2, 2 p. 

Munynn (p) b g 2:21* to 2:20 

WOODNU T 5384. 2:16)4-6, 4 p. 

Flora Woo'lnut, b m 2:25)4 to 2:16 

YOSEMITE 4906. 

Billy McKlnley (p) b g 2:25 



OakUnd Summaries. 



(CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB MEETIN3.) 
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28. 

Six furlongs. Maiden two year olds. Purse 1350— Blllv Moore 110 
(E. Joues) 8 to 1 won, Coming Event 107 second, Redwald 118 third. 
Favorito, Spike, Ariilleryman. Hipponax, Hattie Fox, Beautiful Bill, 
Caesar Young, Tom Sharkey, Firelight II., Calcium Time 1:15. 

Futurity Course. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse 
8350— Rosalnra 112 (Conley) 20 to 1 won, San Mateo 113 second, Jingle 
Jingle 104 third. Monrovia, St. Appoliuaris, Braw Lass, Monda, 
Katie Gibbons, Panamiut, Sally Goodwin, Shellac, Homesiake, Major 
Cook. Time l:io>*j. 

Five furlongs. Selling. Two year olds. Purse 8400— Southern Girl 
109 (Thorpe) 1 to 2 won, Bambouila 1(8 second, Gussie Fay 101 third. 
Gusto, The Scot, Ziska. Time 1:00. 

One mile and an eighth. Selling. Three year olds and upward. 
Purse 8100— Potente 97 ( T. Walsh) 9 to 2 won, TopmaBt 110 second, 
Rosinante 101 third. Morinel. Time 1 :521i. 

One mile TLree year olds and upward, l'ursc 1)00— Lothian 58 
(T. Walsh) 8 to 1 won, Rosormonde 107 second, Timemaker 110 third. 
Poorlands. Time 1:3%. 

Seven furlongs. Free handicap. All ages. Purse 8500— Yellowtail 
105 (E. Ross) 9 to 5 won, Marcato 109 second, Olinthus 103 third. 
Grand Sachem, San Venado, The Fretter, Ringmaster. Time 1:26. 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29. 

Seven furlongs. Selling. Three year olds and npward Purse 
8400-Merry Boy 109 (Jenkins) 8 to 5 won. Donator 104 second, Good 
Hope 109 third. Glen Ann, Billy Mci'loskey. Ringmaster, Jack Mc- 
Cabe, Terrene, Ed Lanigan, Leitcr. Time 1:27%, 

Five furlongs. Selling handicap. All ages. Purse 8100— Aluminum 
90 (Phelan) 8 to 1 won, Ravenna 108 secot.d. Magdaleues 106 third. 
Bister Alice, Clarando, Strongoli, Amasa, Mitsion, Lady Helolse, Will 
Fay. Time 1:00. 

Five and a half furlongs. Two year olds. Purse 8350 -Flower of 
Gold 115 (Spencer) even won. Bee Bee 115 tecond, F. W. Brode 118 
third. L. B. McWhirter, The Echo, Sinuoio. Time 1:07^. 

One mile and a sixteenth. Selling. Three year olds. Purse 8400 
— Horton 107 (E. Jones) 13 to 5 won. Tirade 110 second. Faversham 104 
third. Glengaber, White Fern, Ledaea, Jennie Rcid, Obsidian. 
Time 1:46%. 

One mile. Selling. Three year olds and npward. Purse 8400— 
Wyoming 109 (Spencer) even won. Red Pirate 102 second, Recreation 
108 third. Senator Dubois, Ping, Dr. Marks, Meadowthorpe, El Estro, 
Jael. Time 1 l' 1 ,. 



Futurity Course. Selling. Four yar olds and upwards. Purse 
S300— St. Cuthoert 10J (E Jones) 7 to 10 won, True Blue 109 second, 
Del Paso II , 112 third. Mainstay, Bessie Lee, Tammany, Greyhnrst. 
Time 1:10%. 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31. 

Five furlongs. Selling. All Ages. Purse S100— San Mateo 121 (L 
Turner) 7 to 1 won, Silver Tone 118 second, Etta n. 121 third. Mon- 
rovia, Saul of Tarsus, Miss Soak, Yaruba, Mike Rice. Gusto. Time 
1:02. 

Six furlongs. Selling. Alleges. Purse $400— High Hoe 107 (Vit- 
titoe) 15 to 1 won, Pat Morrissey 108 second, Rosalbra 110 third. 
Yule, Florinel, Choteau, Sylvan Lass, Expedient. Time l:Wh. 

One mile and a sixteenth. Selling. Three years old and npward. 
Purse 8400- Imperious 107 (E. Joneel even won, Einstein 101 second, 
Lost Girl 94 third. Dr. Marks, Grand Sachem, Judge Wofford, Don 
Luis, Scotch Plaid. Time 1:49%. 

One mile and a quarter. Free Handicap. Three years old and 
upward. Purse SS00— D'. Bernays 107 (E. Jones) 2 to 1 won. Meadow- 
thorpe 108 Bccond, Lothian 112 third. Stuttgart, Faunette. Time 
2:10%. 

Seven furlongs. All Ages. Purse 8100— Sybaris 107 (E. Jones) 18 to 
5 won. Dr. Sheppard 110 second. Dr. Nembula 107 third. Princess 
Zeika, Erwin. Time 1 :28%.; 

Five furlongs. All ages Puree 8400-Afamada 107 (Jenkins) 11 to 
10 won, Plan 107 second, February 107 third. Batsuma, Sister Alice. 
Time 1:15%. 



Tanforan Park Summaries. 



I WESTERN TURF ASSOCIATION 1 
MONDAY, JANUARY 1. 

Five furlongs. Selling. Four years old and upward. Purse 8100— 
Loving Cup 115 (E. Jones) even won. Juva 111 second. Nora Ives 111 
third. Modwena, Braw Lass, El Balado, Mad Anthony, Benamela, 
Antioch, Gov. Sheehan. Libertiue, Grej hurst. Time 1:03. 

One and one-eighth miles. Selling. Three years old and upward' 
Pune 8100— Meadowthorpe 112 (E Tones) 11 to 5 won, 8tuttgart iOI 
Fecond, Del Paso II. 112 third. Chimura, Coda, Fortis, Rixford, 
Cromwell, Oraibee, Owyhee Time 1:07%. 

One mile. Selling. Three years old and npward. Purse 8100— 
Cyril 107 (J. Walsh) 10 to 1, won, Scotch Plaid 111 second, Wyoming 
107 third- Merops, Merry Boy, Ailenna, Dogtown, Bishop Reed. 
Time 1:43%. 

One and one-sixteenth miles. New Year'B Handicap. Three 
years old and upward. Purse $600— Potente 108 (T. Walsh) 8 to 1 
won, Imperious 1(8 second, Morinel 109 third. Topmast, Daisy F. 

Time 1:50. 



One and one-quarter mile9 Hurdle Handicap. Four years old 
and upward. Purse $100— MoDita 139 (Lenhart) 7 to 10 won, Ross- 
more 129 second, FI Fi 130 third. Meddler, Una Colorado. Time 

2:27%. 

8ix furlongs. Handicap. Three years old and upward. Puree 
$500-Geyser 119 (Spencer) 6 to won, Bon Ledi 110 second, Frank 
Bell 115 third. Rio Chlco, Sybaris. Snnello, Decoy. Time 1:15. 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2 

Five and a half furlongs. Three year olds. Purse 8100-Wallen- 
stein 109 (Spencer) 8 to 5 won. Rachel C. 109 second, Florinel (I. 110 
third. Presiome, Sisqaoc, The BulTjon, Sam Dannenbanm, Giro, 
Winyah. Time 1:09%. 

Six furlongs. Selling. Four year olds and upward. Puree $100— 
Good Hope 105 (E. Ros*) 6 to 1 won, Maud Ferguson 104 second.Jennie 
Reid 101 third. Mike Rice, Pat Murphy, Racivan, Rio Chico. 
Time 1:16%. 

Seven furlongs Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse $1(0 
—White Fern 104 (Jones) 6 to 1 won, Monda 110 second, O'Connor 108 
third. El Estro, 8ardonic, Benamela, Dolore, Glen Ann, Rosalbra, 
Time 1:30%. 

Five and a half furlongs. Selling, rtree year olds. Purse 8100— 
Ant dnetta 105 (Jenkins) 9 to 5 won, Mandamus 107 second, Tizona 
109 third Aborigine, Ziska, Devereux Time 1:10. 

Six furlongs. Selling. Three year olds and npward. Puree $100— 
Vassal 113 (Spencer) 3 to 2 won. I saline 89 second, Nora Ives 101 third. 
Grand Sachem, Hattie Fox, William F., Florence Fink, Charles Le 
Bel, Regnald Hughes, Clpriano. Time 1:17%. 

One mile. Three year olds and upward. Purse $100— Malay 106 
(Vittltoe) 6 to 1 won, Marcato 111 second, Zoroaster 111 third. Time- 
maker. Flamora, Dos Medauos, F. W. Brode. Time 1:1114. 

WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 3. 

Five lurlongs. Selling. Maiden tbre* year olds. Purse $400— Fonl 
Play (Bnllman) 3 to 2 won, Tom nharkcy 109 second. Caesar Young 
112 third. March Seven, Miss Vera. Bona. FTlle d'Or, Gold Finder, 
St. Agnes. Tekla, Firelight II. Time 1:01% 

Six furlongs. Selling. Three year olds Purse $100— The Lady 103 
(Hill) even won. First Shot 108 second, Gllssando 106 third. Choteau 
Sunello. Time 1:18. 

One mile. Selling. Three year o'ds and upward. Purse $100— 
Facade 106 (Bullman) 5 to 1 won, Wallensteln 91 fecond, Racivan 109 
third. Whitcomb. First Call, Magnus, Inverary II Time 1:16 

Five furlongs. Three year olds and upward. Puree $100- Pardlne 
102 (Vlttitoe) 7 to 10 won, Ben Ledi 111 second. Rio Chlco 113 third. 
Sea Lion, Lulu W., Gold Baron, Spry Lark Time 1:02%. 

One and one-balf miles. Selling. Three year olds and upward 
Purse $100— Chimura 103 (Vittltoe) 6 to 1 won, Dr. Bernays 109 second, 
Stuttgart 105 third. Fauuette, Fonis. Time 2:42. 

One mile. Four year olds and upward. Purae $100— Formero 111 
(Ruiz) 10 to 1 won, Bannockburn 114 second. 8an Venado 114 third. 
Del Paso II, Dogtown, Gov. Sheehan. Time 1:11J£. 



January 6, 1900] 



9 




Fish Lines. 



Striped bass anglers do not often have opportunity to try 
for the bass in the surf after the manner the Eastern angler 
indulges in the sport, the reasons for this are obvious; surf 
fishing, at least in turbulent water such as the fish frequent 8 
on the Atlantic Coast, can not be found alone our bay shores 
and fishing on the ocean beach near this city has no t 
been tried to any great extent as the habits of the fish and 
his particular choice of loeality are as yet unfamiliar to our 
anglers, the sport at present being in but little more than an 
experimental or prospective stage. To Al dimming, we 
believe, belongs the honor of making the pioneer catch in 
fishing for striped bass in the Eurf. Mr. Cumming left for 
Salmon creek (a stream in Sonoma county emptying into the 
ocean near Duncan's Point) last week in response to a mes- 
sage from Mrs. Colby, of the Ocean View Hotel, to the effect 
that striped bass were thick in the lagoon and also that wild 
ducks were plentiful in that district. 

Our angler found that the bass had been in the lagoon 
and creek for seme time past, but all efforts to strike the 
wary fish were not very successful notwithstanding. On 
Friday morning of last week Mr. Cumming noticed an im- 
mense flock of gulls circling around in the air and also a 
great number of sea lions, large and small, disporting and 
feeding in the turbulent surges near a point of the shore 
close to the lagoon entrance. Surmising that small fish 
were being pursued and fed upon at that spot in the surf 
and concluding that the bass would take a part in the pro- 
ceedings, he made several casts into the storm threshed 
waters and was agreeably surprised by a strike and after 
some maneuvering through the recurrent undertows he finally 
landed a five pound fish. Shortly afterwards he was lucky 
enough to land another and smaller one. Besides the bass 
hooked he also made a fine catch of red-tailed perch, a fish 
which abounds on that particular sand beach. The rod used 
was a two j minted steel rod wrapped with silk from tip to the 
separable butt (a very effective rod bv the way), rigged with 
a 15 strand cutty hunk line and 5 ought O'Shaughneesy hook 
baited with a whole clam. 

This tackle is light, strong and effective, but in nany 
places on our rock imbedded Coast shores the angler will 
find extreme difficulty in preventing his line from becoming 
fast to the many bottom obstacles and also in clearing the 
tackle subsequently. 

For the fisherman the vicinity of Los Angeles is claimed 
to be a small sized paradise, the angler can fish every day in 
the year if he wishes. During the season good trout fishing 
can be had in almost any of the mountain streams, while 
ocean fishing is available at any time. An hour's ride on a 
comfortable electric car lands the fisherman on the wharf at 
Santa Monica and the same length of time by train will take 
him to Redondo or San Pedro, at either of which places 
good fishing can be had. Boats are plentiful and cheap, and 
expert boatmen are always available at very moderate rates. 
Tbe fishing at Catalina is said to be without an equal at any 
point in the country. Herj leaping tuna, the great ocean 
bass, commonly known as the jswtisb, and weighing any- 
where from 75 to 409 pounds, is taken, as well as the gamey 
barracuda and yellowtail, as fine fish as can be found any- 
where, besides dozens of varieties of smaller fry. 



The net fisherman near the mouth of the Russian river 
possibly believed in the apparent safety from consequences 
that might attend any attempts in furthering their nefarious 
poaching by reason of comparatively long immunity from 
seizures on the river — that belief was based on slight founda- 
tion. Deputy Fish Commissioners Cross and Kerchival 
captured two large set nets last Friday morning. Tbe loss 
of the nets is a serious one at this time, boxes of steelhead 
are bringing good prices in the market at present. Tbe 
capture is an important one, inasmuch as 1200 miles of 
trout water are tributary to the mouth of the Russian river, 
and illicit operations of the kind indicated at this season 
would have a serious influence in checking the propagation 
of steelhead trout. 

The San Francisco Fly-Casting Club will hold a regular 
monthly meeting next Tuesday evening. The jolly anglers 
and their friends will diecuss business matters, fishing and 
other subjects germain over tbe banquet board. As the en- 
tertainment will include choruses by the Club, members have 
been requested to bring their voices. A pleasing program of 
vocal and instrumental selections has been prepared. The 
banquets of the club during the past year have been particu- 
larly pleasant and congenial meetings, the dinner next week 
will by no means be an exception to the rule. 

On the let and 2d Sundays in Februarv the club tackle 
will be at Stow Lake and new members will be instructed in 
the various events. 



The Chicago Fly-Casting Club closed the season of 1899 
with a banquet on the evening of December 2Gtb. Thirty 
members were present. The awards of medals, for highest 
averages in eight contests, were as follows: 

Class A — Long distance, 1. H. Bellows, 118 1-8 feet. Dis- 
tance and accuracv, F. N. Peet, 88 7-8. Accuracy and deli- 
cacy, C. A. Lippincott, 96 1-8. Bait-casting, H O. Hascall, 
94 87-120. 

Class E — Long distance, A. C. Smitb, 10O| feet. Distance 
and accuracy, H. Qreenwood, 84 19 24. Accuracy and 
delicacy, C. F. Blown, 86 11-48. Bait-casting, H. W. Perce, 
92 7-60. I. H. Bellows won the All-Round Championship 
Cup for the season. 




L03 ANGELES LIVE BIRD TOURNAMENT. 



Pigeon Shooters Interfered With By the Hu 
mane Sooiety. 

The annual live bird tournament of the Los Argeles Gun 
Club commencing on Sunday, December 31st and concluded 
on New Year's Day bids fair to become a cause eclebre in the 
annals of trap shooting on the Pacific Coast. Previous to 
the meeting the sportsmen were apprised that representatives 
of the Humane Society of Los Angeles would be present and 
that arrests would follow the shooting of live pigeons. The 
members of the society claim that the sport is unnecessary 
and gives unnecessary pain, and therefore, under the statute, 
is cruelty to animals. They base their claim on the recent 
decision rendered by Justice of tbe Peace James in tbe Black 
coursing case, which was upheld by Superior Judge Smith 
of Los Angeles. The latter in giving his decision said : 

"Defendant cites the case of Commonwealth vs. Lewis, 140 
Penn. 261. That was a prosecution under a statute which 
provided, 'Any person who shall wantonly or cruelly ill- 
treat any animal shall be punished,' etc. The defendant in 
that case was accused of cruelly shooting and wounding a 
pigeon. The facts were that defendant, as a member of a 
gun club, shot pigeons from a trap, and one was merely 
wounded and not killed, and hence the prosecution. The 
court held it no infraction of the statute, but the Pennsyl- 
vania statute is unlike our own. There it was merely a ques- 
tion of the pain and suSaring of the bird, and not a question 
as to whether it was a necessary killing. Oar statute would 
seem to make the needless killing of any animal a misde- 
mernor. The Pennsylvania statute has reference entirely to 
the mode of killing. Its reasoning is that the defendant had 
a right to kill tbe pigeon, and if not unnecessarily tortured 
it was no infraction of their statute. So that the case cannot 
throw much light on the one at bar. 

The Missouri case, cited by defendant (4 Mo., Court of 
Appeals, 215), is under a statute similar to our own. There 
shooting pigeons from a trap was held not unlawful, and that 
the killing was not needless, as it tended to promote skill in 
marksmanship. The court says: 'Yet in favor of those sports 
which are considered healthful recreations and exercise, tend- 
iga to promote strength, bodily activity and courage, the 
pain that comes with a lingering death in the lower animals 
is often disregarded in the customs and laws of highly civi- 
lized people.' But no such justification can be urged for 
coursing. It is not a pastime that develops skill in any di- 
rection that by any possibility can benefit the public or 
State." 

There has been more or less agitation for some time ps.st 
concerning the matter of cruelty in pigeon shooting, chiefly 
fomented by members of prevention of cruelty organizations, 
in view of this, the disposition of two cases by learned 
jurists may be of some interest and value to sportsmen who 
are molested by the mistaken zeal of individuals who imagine 
that their personal vagaries and whimsical desires are the 
true standards of what is cruel and what is not. The first 
case is from the records of the Quarter Sessions Court of 
Alleghany county, Pa , 1892, and was quite an important 
one, being the Commonwealth vs. Denny et. al. The defend, 
ants were acquitted. In the second case of tbe Commonwealth 
vs. Lewis, cited above, judgment and fine was entered against 
the defendent in the lower court. The case was then taken 
on appeal to the Supreme Court where judgment was re- 
versed and defendant acquitted. Another case is tbe recent 
Colorado decision where a statute provides that shooting 
pigeons by any regularly organized club is lawful, yet in the 
face of this law the Denver Humane Society attacked one 
club but was defeated before the courts. 

We are inclined to believe that the fact, that live bird 
shooting is indulged in by gentlemen as a sport has more to 
do with the matter than the question of cruelty. Hume 
people have an unhappy faculty of condemning' anything and 
everything in the nature of sport or recreation in which 
they themselves have no particular or immediate interest or 
capacity to enjoy. Of these gentry we might say they are 
built on the lines of Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, neither up- 
right nor good and undeserving of the trust imposed in them. 

The society officers desired to arrest every shooter on Sun- 
day who shot a bird, but Sheriff Hammel would.not make 
more arrests than necessary to make a test case. 

It had been arranged that Deputy Sheriff Harrington 
Smith should make the arrests and confiscate one gun and 
one trap. He was to bring the offender to the city, where 
Justice James was waiting to name bail. At 9 o'clock an 
electric car arrived at the club's new grounds near Sherman, 
bringing there Messrs. A. W. Bruner, Chas. Van Valken- 
burg, J. S. Nicholson, J. S. Sedam of the club, Deputy 
Sheriff Smitb, in company with Humane Officer Craig and 
F. A. Seymour, president of the society; Messrs. C. W. Sex- 
ton, A. E. McConnell, E. Fickett, F. E. Palmer, Newton 
Hogan, all members of the Humane Society. 



About an hour was lost in waiting for the birds and fixing 
up the traps; then E. Vaughan stepped up to shoot in the 
first event. The trap was opened, a pigeon flew forth, one 
shot killed it and Vaughan started to retire. 

"You are under arrest, Mr. Vaughan," said Deputy Smith, 

"All right, Mr. Sheriff," replied Vaughan, and the same 
course was taken with the following shooters: J. Matfield, 
C. Van Valkenburg. A W. Bruner, S. R. 8mitb, A. B.' 
Daniels, J. S. Sedam, F. N. Schofield, M. Chick, W. a! 
Hillis, C. Aldrich, N. Nichols and A. Mills. As soon as the 
last man had shot, the party boarded an electric car, return- 
i Jg to the city and courthouse, where they met Justice James 
and put up $10 each to appear Tuesday afternoon, the 2d 
inst. This took until noon, when the party returned to the 
grounds and continued tbe sport. 

The first event Sunday was a 12 bird race, $8 entrance, 
three moneys, high guns. In this there were 16 entries. 
The scores were: Van Valkenburg 12, Hillis 12, Vaughan 
11, Smith 11, Sedam 11, Haight 11, Nauman 11, Matfield 10, 
Chick 10, Nichols 10, Mills 10, Bruner 9, Daniels 9, Scho- 
field 9, Aldrich 9, Hauerwass 9 

The second event was left unfinished, when each side had 
shot 15 birds. It was a four man team race between 8an 
Diego and Los Angeles, for 25 birds per man. Entrance 
money per team $100. The scores were: 

8an Diego— Schofield 14, Daniels 13, Sedam 15, Chick 13; 
total 55. 

Los Angeles— Matfield 13, Vaughan 13, Van Valkenburg 
13, Bruner 11; total 50. 

The conclusion of the tournament took place on New 
Year's Diy. Deputy Sheriff Smith made further arrests of 
Jonn Hauerwass, Clarence A. Haight and Clarence C. Nau- 
man when the scheduled events were afterwards carried out 
according to program. 

The unfinished team shoot (ten birds per man) resulted in 
a victory for 8an Diego. The scores were: 

8an Diego— Schofield 8, Daniels 9, Sedam 9, Chick 10. 
Total, 55 and 3G, 91 out of 100 pigeons. 

Los Angeles— Matfield 7, Vaughan 8, Van Valkenburg 9, 
Bruner 10. Total, 50 and 34, 84 out of 100 pigeons. 

The second event was a miss and out event with Sedam 
Daniels, 8mith, 8chofield, Aldrich, Chick, Van Valkenburg 
and Nichols as entries. 

The third event was an 8 bird race, $5 entrance, three 
moneys, high guns, during which Smith, Vaughan, Sedam, 
Nauman, Haight, Van Valkenburg, Bruner and Freeman 
killed 8 each; Hillis, Schofield, Chick, Daniels and Aldrich. 
7 birds each; Nichols 6 birds. 

Fourth event, 25 birds each, entrance $25, birds included. 
All shooters in this event started at 26 yards, and each 
shooter was handicapped one yard for each time he scored 5 
birds straight at 28, 29, 30 or 31 yards. High guns, four 
moneys: Van Valkenburg, Bruner, 8edam and Nauman 
killing 24 each; Vaughan and Hillis, 22 each; Chick and 
Daniels, 21 each; Haight and Smith, 20 each, and Aldrich 18. 

The meeting was well attended by local and visiting 
sportsmen. 

Among those present were : Messrs. Haight, McMurchy, 
Schultz and Nauman of San Francisco; W. A. Hillis of 
8outh Libby, Mont.; C. A. Lougee of Spokane, Wash.; Sam 
Thompson of Fresno; 8mith of Riverside; Vaughan of 
Santa Ana; Marlines Chick, A. W. Bruner, Capt. Jake 
Sedam, and Mr. Daniels of Denver, Charles Van Valken- 
burg and others. Many spectators were also present during 
both days who it is needless to remark were unanimous in 
expressing their friendly sentiments in favor of tbe trap 
shooters. 

The arrested shooters were held to appear in Justice 
James court on last Tuesday afternoon whea A. W. Bruner, 
president of the gun club, was to submit his case as a test 
case. The club members are very much worked up over 
what they term the unwarranted interference of the Humane 
Society. They propose to contest the matter from start to 
finish and carry the cases, if necessary, to the highest 
tribunals. 



CARTRIDGE AND SHELL. 



A gun club has been organized at Hueneme. 

Quail shooting open season in Marin county will close on 
the 15i.h inst. 

The duck hunters have found weather conditions to their 
liking for the past week. The marshes have been sought for 
safety and feed by thousands of ducks and numerous big bags 
have fallen to the gunmen in the blinds. Canvasback have 
been exceedingly plentiful, particularly so on the east bay 
shore marshes. Richardson's bay has been tbe resort for 
thousands of canvasback and blue-bill, and now for the first 
time in many years this once favorite duck shooting water 
has been frequented by many hunters who generally man- 
aged to pick up good sized bags of birds in prime condition. 
The eastern portions of San Pablo bay and adjacent waters, 
as well as Suisun bay have also been tbe resting places of 
immense flocks of toothsome 'cans' and blue-bills. Qeeee 
are also becoming quite plentiful on the marshes. 

Quail hunters have found as usual, best results in Marin 
county, Point Reyes district still abounds in a fairly plentiful 
supply of birds. Hunters have found the vicinity of Liver- 
more productive to a limited extent. 

Among those who made good bags on the Alameda shore 
were Jim Maynard and Dr. Lane at Willow lodge, T. Belloff 
and Brother; Dan Ostrander, George Franzen, W. Price, H. 
Swan and F. Flint; Mr. and Mrs. (Sinclair, iu tbe vicinity of 
Alvarado. Fritz Walperts bagged many 'cans' at the Bridges. 
Lee Larzelere and Nelson Brothers at the Spooney club pre- 
serve. Chas and Frank Cate at Mowrys. 

On the Suisun marshes A. M. Shields, Ed Cramer, A. Roos 
and Otto FecdDer bagged 160 cans shooting on the Pringle 
ponds on New Year's day. The best bags for the week have 
been credited to the Alameda Gun Club. 



10 



January 6, 1900 



Nine black brant, a rare game bird in that section, were 
killed near Coronado on November 29th. 



Numerous ring-neck pheasants have been turned loose in 
Santa Barbara county, by the Santa Barbara Game Protective 

Association. 

Considerable sport has been had in the channel of! Long 
Beach during the past month shooting flying fish. Experts 
try the rifle while others use shot guns. 



Christmas Day was celebrated bv Reno sportsmen in a live 
pige >n shoot at the Hawcroft ranch south of town. There 
were three matches, two for twelve birds and one for nine. 
W. Conover won first money in the first match. Hawcroft, 
Wheeler and Conover tied in the second match and the third 
was won by Ed Morton, 



An artistic calendar for 1900 has been issued by the Union 
Metallic Cartridge Company. The past glories of wild life 
and sport on the western plains are suegested by the artist 
in a realistic and naturally colored drawing of a bull bison's 
head — the lord of the plains (the visible portion of him) is 
seen pausing with distended nostril and watchful eye just 
before stooping to munch the succulent bunch grass which 
carpets the prairie spread before him. 



A common excuse made by parties who have killed a large 
number of ducks, quail or snipe, is that "not a bird was 
wasted; we bad plenty of friends who were willing to take 
what we didn't want" — or words to that effect. This excuse 
might be used with just as much show of reason by every 
market-hunter in the country; if there is anybody who 
doesn't waste a bird, that person is the market-hunter, to 
whom every bird represents so many cents. The feeling 
against large bags of game is based more on the comparative 
scarceness of tbe game itself, rather than on the fact that 
large bags may be followed by a certain amount of waste. 



There are still plenty of wild turkeys left in the Southern 
States, and also in some of the northern portions of the con- 
tinent. Of coarse, the supply is nothing like what it was a 
few years ago, but still turkeys are not hard to get if only 
one eoes where they are, and knows what to do when the 
turkeys are found. It may not seem like tp3ft to lie in an 
ambuscade and "yelp" op an old gobbler, but it produces a 
certain quickening of the pulse that indicates a degree of ex- 
citement akin to that which catches hold of a man when he 
sees his first deer within gunshot. It is no easy matter to 
fool an old gobbler. Young turkeys that have been well 
scattered can be easily called up and shot from behind a 
blind; but an old gobbler is a different subject, and the man 
that gets him may take credit to himself, for he has surely 
shown skill in hunting one of the wariest game birds in tbe 
world, as well as one of the most noble specimens of bird life 
ever seen. 

Shooting gray fquirrels with a small calibre rifle is a spor' 
that most anybody would erjoy and has for several season 8 
past been the particular recreation of many Eastern sports- 
men when the open season for the gray squirrel is on. It is 
a sport that is best pursued alone, as squirrels are wary and 
quick eared, and need great care and absolute stillness on the 
part of tbe hunter who would fill his bag with the long tails. 
Sunrise in the woods on a still morning is something to be 
enjoyed in addition to the sport obtained when squirrels are 
numerous. Seated on a log, that should be no stiller than 
the man sitting on it, the hunter hears sounds and sees sights 
that don't come to him any other time. Birds flit about him 
in the first rays of the sun; the old cock grouse, one hundred 
yards away, fills the air at intervals with the booming sound 
produced by his "drumming" on his favorite log; a squirrel 
barks in a distant tree, and the hunter also catches a glimpse 
of one as it leaps from bough to bough, making its way to a 
well known hickory some little distance away. The 22 cali- 
bre is glanced at to make sure it is ready, and if teltscope 
sights are used, they are scanned to see if everything is all 
right. They will soon be needed, if squirrel stew is wanted. 



Many people wonder how target shooting came to be first 
introduced into tbe list of sports. The honor of tbe inven- 
tion of inanimate target shooting really belongs to that past- 
master at the trap, Capt. Adam H. Bogardus, Capt. Bogar- 
dus, to give him bis title, was first of all a market hunter, 
born in New York state, but transplanted at an early age to 
the then (1856) virgin soil of Illinois. After years of prac- 
tice in the field, every year of which made him more and 
more expert with his gun, Bogardus graduated with the 
highest honors, national and international, at the pigeon 
traps, beating about everybody be met, and in general beat- 
ing them with comparative ease. 

The popularity of live-pigeon shooting and its attendant 
expense to those who were fond of shooting, led Bogardus to 
hunt around for something to take its place cheaply and 
effectively. His glass ball, filled with feathers, and his glass 
ball trap, did the work for a time. Then the inventive 
genius of the Americans came to the front, and once the idea 
was grasped the natural evolution of tbe target or "clay 
pigeon" was the result. The Ligowsky pigeon made of red 
clay was the first of its kind, but it was quickly followed by 
the Kooiville;blackbird, the bluerock of Cleveland and sev- 
eral varieties of the yellow ringed asphalt saucer now so 
familiar to the trap shooter. 



RatrievlDjj Notes. 

-A curious hunting incident is related by W. R. Hervey, a 
well known musician and member of the Tamalpais Gun 
Club. He was quail" shooting on the club's preserve in 
Marin county recently. During the day he took a wing 
shot at a quail, the bird fell, but was up and off again almost 
immediately, flying in a direct lice rather slowly and about 
two feet from the ground. Mr. Hervey's English setter 
bitch Wanda H. started after the wounded bird, cbasing it for 
about 100 yards, gradually gaining and finally retrieved i 
on the wing, bringing the wounded bird back to her master. 

We noted a somewhat similar occurrence about two years 
ago — Geo. Watson was giving his greyhounds a run one 
morning along the shores of Lake Merced. A wounded 



duck arose from the surface of the lake, frightened and 
seeking safety in flight from the early morning intruders 
on the scene. The disabled bird's flight at first was erratic 
to such an extent and so close to the ground that Watson 
easily induced both of his dcgs to start after the bird upon 
sighting it. A short chase and one of the hounds snapped 
up the duck in flight, coursing a feathered kill, the only one 
on record, we believe. 

Home-Made Knite Blades. 

One of the many articles used by the sportsman and which 
he wishes to know about making is a good knife blade, one 
he can depend on when in the woods, one which has neither 
a glass or lead edge. A knife that is true blue, which neither 
crumbles nor turns at the edge when most needed, is some- 
thing not found at every store where knives are sold. There 
are knives and knives on the markei; prices vary, but do not 
always fix the quality. I may be pessimistic, but I believe 
most blacksmiths' apprentices of three months' experience at 
the forge can make a better cutting blade, by attention to the 
following directions, than can be bought at many stores in 
this country at any price. I judge by experience: 

To make a hunting knife one needs a blade to cut browse 
for a bed. to cut dry as well as green wood, cut meat, and for 
all uses about camp. It should not turn its edge easily when 
striking a bone nor should it nick out its edge on green bone 
or hard wood. The best of fine tool steel is selected in 
square or flit bars; round rods are not so good. Use char- 
coal in the forge fire if possible; if not at hand use well coked 
bituminous coal burned clear of sulphur. Draw out the 
blade to length and shape, always keeping this advice in 
mind. Do not heat too hot, or hammer too cold; just a 
bright red. Cease hammering after the color has left. Do 
not attempt to draw it very thin at the cutting edge, but 
leave it rather thick. Anneal by cooling slowly and grind 
or file to shape, but do not thin the cutting edge. This is 
where many make mistakes. If the edge is too thin it is no ( 
properly hardened or is burned, or warps and bends in heat, 
ing. Leave it thick. See that the fire is bright and even. 
Put the blade in, edge down, and heat to a red. Do not 
drive the blower too hard; take lime. When heated well on 
the edge and half the blade — never mind the back — plunge 
quickly in clear soft water, dipping it, edge down, in the 
liquid. Do not attempt to plunge endwise or point first, as 
it may be warped out of shape, and an uneven edge at the 
best may be the result. Grind off the sides along the edge 
to brighten. Next place it lengthwise over the bright coab 
back down. Do not attempt to draw the temper by laying it 
on its side. Keep a slow, steady blast on, and note the color 
as it starts along tbe back. When the color has started, go 
slowly and watch carefully. The color will first assume a 
straw color, then yellow, then brown, then purple spots will 
appear. When that color has been reached, remove from 
the fire and swing it rapidly back and forth through the air 
to cool it instead of dipping. 

This is said to be the way the world famed Damascus 
sword blades were tempered; at any rate, it makes a superior 
cutting blade. No trouble need be feared; if the color is not 
running too fast the draught of air will check and cool it. 
If the knife is wanted for meat cutting exclusively, let the 
color run to a clear purple, then swing as before directed. I ( 
will be noted that in hardening by this method one mske g 
sure of the edge or thinner part, while the back may be a 
little soft. In drawing the temper the back is next the fire 
and the color starts there; when it reaches the edge it has 
little chance to run by. The process of dipping insures 
hardening with little danger of springing the blade, as it is 
thick on the edge. Now grind tbe blade thin as desired. 
The true cutting edge should not be a long bevel or acute 
angle, but the blade is comparatively thick just back of the 
edge; the cutting bevel, or camel, as the cutler calls it, is an 
acute angle of 25 degrees running from the edge toward the 
back alike on each side. That gives strength and support to 
the edge, and is claimed to be the best angle ever found for 
general purposes. I have used knives made in this way for 
many years and find them far ahead of those I buy, as re- 
gards fine cutting qualities. Almost anything seems to 
answer for some people, but the hunter and woodsman can 
get nothing too good for his use, where so much depends at 
times on the quality of bis implements and arms. 

Should the blade be sprung and require stiaightening, it 
can be done by laying it on its side and striking with a ham- 
mer while hot, just before the required color comes in tem- 
pering; but it must not lie on tbe anvil long to cool it, just a 
moment before the hammer hits it, then raise it. Look 
to see if it is straight; if not, hit it again. While the steel 
is hot it does not break easily, but yields to tbe blow, 
although quite hard. If struck cold it would not set, but 
might break. A soft back knife blade or sword blade may 
sometimes be straightened considerably by pieniug with a 
light hammer, warming it up well and laying it on an anvil, 
which is also warmed; but it is apt to bow the blade a little 
toward the edge. — H. in Shooting and Fishing. 



The Game Law. 

The synopsis of the game laws appearing below and pub- 
lished in the Breeder and Sportsman for several years 
past has, from time to time been changed or the provisions 
of new ordinances added thereto by reason of the many and 



various changes in tbe county game and fish laws, particu- 
larly those of recent date and of application in and around 
the bay counties. 

This synopsis has been frequently copied (in more or less 
garbled and incomplete form) and quoted by city and interior 
journals and has also been printed and distributed by busi- 
ness houses. While the information given at the date of is- 
suance was substantially correct, we do not care to be held 
responsible for the circulation of old matter that is now in- 
correct in many details. Some complaint has been made in 
this respect and to avoid misunderstanding in the future it is 
suggested that for information of this character a reference 
be made to current numbers of tbe Brreder and Sports 
man for the latest and most complete ;data coneerning the 
Game Laws. 

The county enactments relative to the shipment of game 
have become inoperative under the decision of the Supreme 
Court of California, rendered December 5, 1899, in the case 
of James Knapp on habeas corpus, appealed from the 
Superior Court of Stanislaus county. 

The open Beason for shooting quail, doves, deer and wild duck as 
fixed oy the State law is as follows: Doves, 15th July to 15th Febru- 
ary. Mountain quail and grouse, 1st September to 15th February. 
Valley quail, wild duck and rail. 1st October to 1st March. Male deer, 
15th July to 15th October. Pheasants, the taking, killing, selling or 
having in possession at any time la prohibited ; robbing or destruc- 
tion of nests or having pheasant eggs in possession is a misdemeanor 
in the following counties: Butte, Trinity, Marin, Lake, Merced- 
Riverside, Los Angeles, 8an Bernardino. Santa Barbara, Kings, Ven, 
tura, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Joaquin, Yuba. 

The clerks of nearly all the Boards of Suoervisors have advised us 
no changes have been made this year, but the ordinances passed 
last year hold good if they do not conflict with the State law. The 
following counties nave not passed any ordinances that alter 
the open season as provided by State law : Amador, Butte, Inyo, 
Modoc, Mono, Mendocino, Mariposa, Nevada, Napa, Plumas, 
San Diego, Solano, Siskiyou, Tehama, and Yolo. 

The changes are as follows : 

Alpine— Deer. Sept. 2 to Oct. 15. 

Alameda— Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. L Male deer. July 15 to Oct. 1 
Pheasants protected until February, 190J. Hunting, killing or hav- 
ing in possession for purpose of sale or shipment out of county: 
quail, bob white, partridge, wild duck, rail, mountain quail, grouse, 
dove, does or deer, antelope, elk or mountain sheep prohibited. 

Colusa— Deer, Aug. 15 to Oct. 15. 

Calaveras— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct, 15. 

Contra Costa— Deer, July 20 to 8ept. 2. (Use of dogs prohibited). 

El Dorado— Doves, Jnly 20 to Feb. 1. Trout, Jnne 1 to Dec. 1. 

Fresno— Valley quail, Nov. 1 to Jan. 31. Individual bag limited to 
25 quail per day. Mountain quail, Sept. 1 to Feb. 15. Doves, Aug. 15 
to Feb 15. Pheasants, bob white quail and prairie chickens, close 
season In for e for an indefinite period. Use of nets or seines in 
county waters|prohibited. Shipment of game from county prohibited. 

Glenn— Deer, venison, dried venison, aeer skin, buck, doe or fawn; 
quail, grouse, pheasant, dove, plover, snipe or wild duck, shipping or 
taking out of the county prohibited 25 birds per year individual 
limit to be taken from the county upon licensed permission. 

Humboldt— urouse and Wilson snipe, sept. 1 to Feo. 15. Killing of 
waterfowl prohibited between one-half hour after sunset and one 
hall hour before sunrise. Pheasants and wild turkeys protected 
until Oct. 1, 1900. Black brant, Oct. 1 to March 1. Shipment of game 
out of the count; prohibited. Deer, use of dogs prohibited. Striped 
bass— Close Beason until Jan. 1, 1905 

Kern— Shipping game ont of the county prohibited. Quail, Oct. 1 
to Feb. 1 Bronze Ibis or curlew— Robbing or destroying nests or 
taking eggs, prohibited. 

Kings— Doves, Sept. 1 to Feb. 15. Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 15. 

Lake— Deer, Aug. 1 to Oct. 1. 
■Shasta— Deer, July 15 to Sept. 1. Shipment of feathered game ont 
of the county prohibited. 

Sierra— Deer. Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Siskiyou— Shipment of feathered game out of the county prohibited. 

Sonoma— Deer. July 15 to Oct. 1. Quail, Nov. 1. to Feb. 1 Pheas- 
ants, close season till Jan. 1, 1904. Shipping game out of the county, 
hunting within private enclosures, prohibited. Use of nets in streams 
ol the county prohibited. 

Stanislaus— Wild ducks, dove, quail or snipe, shipment from the 
county prohibited. 

Sutter— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. Doves, July 15 to Jan. 1. 

Trinity— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Tulare— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. Shipping game out of the county 
prohibited. 

Vnntnra— Quail, any variety. Oct. 1 to Nov. 1. Hunting for Bale 
or market of quail, grouse, dove, wild duck, deer or mountain sheep 
prohibited, except between Oct. 10th and 15th. 

Yuba— Shipping ducks and quail from the county to market pro- 
hibited. 

Los Angeles— Male deer, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. Valley quail, bob 
white or mountain quail, Dec 1 to Jan. 1. Doves, July 15 to Oct. 1. 
Shooting for sale, or shipment of quail, bob white, partridges, pheas- 
ants, grouse, doves, ducks, rails or other game protected by statute, 
prohibited. Ducks, individual bag limited to 25 biros per day. 
Shipping game to market* outride of theconntv prohibited. Sea- 
gulls, egrets, pelicans, seals, protected. Trout season opens April 1 Bt. 

Marin— Deer, July 16 to Sept. 15. Quail, partridge or grouse, Oct. 15 
to. Ian. 15 Individual bag limited to 25 birds per day. Market hunting 
and shipment of game from the county is probibited. Use of 
Repeating shot guns prohibited. Killing of meadow larks or 
any other song birds prohibited. Hunting within private enclosures 
or on public roads pronibited. Trout, with hook and line only, Aprl 1 
to Oct. 15. 

Madera— Market hunting prohibited. 

Monterey— Deer, July 15th to Sept. 1st. (Use of dogs prohibited). 
Quail, Oct. 1 to Feb. 1. Shipping or taking game out of the county 
prohibited. 

Napa— Trout, by book and line only, April 1 to Dec. 1. 
Orange— Doves, Aug. 1 to Feb, 1. Deer, Aug. la to Oct. 1. (Market 
hunting prohibited). Quail, partridges or grouse, Oct. 1 to Oct. 5. 
DuckB, Nov. 1 to March 1. Ducks and quail, shipment from the 
county restricted as follows: No person shall ship ducks or quail 
out of the county in quantities to exceed two dozen birds a week. 
Market bunting prohibited, 
k Placer— Trout, lune 1 to Dec. 1. 
Plumas— Salmon, trout, May 1 to Dec. 1 (netting prohibited.) 
Riverside— Male deer, close season until July 15, 1901. July 15 to 
Sept. 15, thereafter. Quail, individual bag limited to 20 bl.d? per 
day. Mountain or valley quail, pheasant and wild duck, sale of pro- 
hibited in the county, wild duck, valley or mountain quail, ship- 
ment from county prohibited. Tront, any variety, close season until 
May 1, 1901. May 1 to Dec. 1, thereafter. 

Sacramento -Quail, ducks, doves, pheasants: shooting for sale and 
market out of county prohibited. Taking or shipping out of county 
of more than ten blrd9 in one day by any person prohibited. 

San Benito— Deer, Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. Market hunting and ship- 
ment of game out of county prohibited. Quail, partridge or grouse, 
Oct. 15 to Feb. 1. Individual bag limited to 30 birds per day. 
Mountain quail, perpetual close season. Trout, April 1 to Oct. 15. 

San Bernardino— Deer, July 15 to Sept 15;(close season continuous, 
1899.) Valley or mountain quail, wild duck, sale of and shipment 
out of county prohibited. Trout, catching or sale of, between April 
1st and May 1st of any year and during 1899, prohibited. Tree 
squirrels, five per day the Individual limit. 
San Diego— Shipping gameoutof the county prohibited. 
San Juaquln— Shipping or taking game out of the county pro- 
hibited. Shooting on public road probibited. 

San Luis Obispo— Deer, July 15 to Sept. 1. Use of hounds prohib- 
ited. Doves, July 15 to Dec. 1. Hnntlng for markets situated outside 
of the county prohibited. Clams, use of plows or machines In digging 
prohibited. Shipment of abalones out of the connly prohibited. 

San Mateo— Deer, Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. (Dae of dogs not prohibited. 
Market hunting prohibited). Rail. Oct. 15 to Nov. 1. (Shooting from 
boat at high tide prohibited). Quail, Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. 

Santa Barbara— Deer, Aug. 1 to Aug. 22. Use of hounds pro- 
hibited. Quail, Nov. 1 to Mar^h 1. Dove*, Aug. 15 to Feb. 15. 
Market hunting and sale of game in the county prohibited. Lobsters 
or crawfish, cloae season, April 15 to Aug. 15, shipping from county 
in close season prohibited. Abalones, taking, selling, having in 
ssesslon and shipping from the county prohibited. Clams can not 
dug till July. 1902 
Santa Clara— Male deer, July 16 to Oct. 15. Valley or mountain 
quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 1. Individual bag limited to 20 birds per day, 
Quail, pheasants and doves, purchase and sale, or shipment out of, 
or into the county prohibited. Wild duck, purchase and sale, or 
shipment out of county of ducks killed in the county prohibited. (In 
force Nov 9). 

Santa Cruz— Shipping game from the couuty prohibited 



January 6, 1900] 



11 




Coming Events. 



BENCH SHOWS. 
Feb. 20— 23— Westminster Kennel Club. 24th annual show. New 
York. James Mortimer, sup't. 

FIELD TRIALS. 
-Kentucky Field Trial Association. Inaugural trials 



Ky. H. D. Newcomb,. sec'y. 

South Carolina Game Protective and Field Tiial Associa- 
tion. Inaugujal trials. 8. C. W. G. Jeffords, sec'y. 

Jan. 22, 1900— United States Field Trials Club. West Point, Miss. 
W. B. Stafford, sec'y. . . , , . . , 

Champion Field Trials Association's annual trials. Wes 

Point, Miss. (Following U. S. Trials). W. B. Stafford, sec'y. 

Jan 22, 1900— Pacific Coast Field Trials. 17th annual trials. 
Bakersfield. J. E. de Ruyter, sec'y. , „ 

Feb. 5. 1900— Alabama Field Trials Club. 4th annual trials. Green- 
ville. T. H. Spencer, sec'y. 

Feb. 19C0— Texas Field Trial Club. 4th annual trials. 

Tex, G. A. Chabot, sec'y-treas. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



The formation of a national field trial association seems to 
be meeting with great favor among the EaBtern field trial 
organizations. 

Mr. P. C. Meyer was unfortunate in losing his promising 
young rough coat 8t. Bernard recently. Minstrel Boy was 
by Prince Sylvia ex Princess R. and bid fair to make his 
mark as a sire. 

The red cocker epaniel puppy, Hampton Goldie, recently 
sold by a Detroit breeder to a San Francisco fancier, won 
first in puppy, novice and open dcgs at the late Oakland 
bench show. In puppy dogs there were but two entries; in 
open and novice the winner of first was the only dog entered 
in the two classes. Omo Girl, a previous purchase from the 
same source, won second in open bitches, three competitors 
being in the class. She won first in puppy bitches the year 
previous at Oakland, there being but two entries in the class. 

The decision of Judge Smith of Cincinnati in the case of 
M. H. Fagin against the Humane Society was a sweeping 
declaration of independence for the dog as a creature of 
some value and rights in the law. Hitherto a private corpora- 
tion has been in the habit of seizing dogs without the sanction 
of any court. This is now declared unconstitutional, as dogs 
are animals of value and entitled to the same consideration 
as swine, geese, chickens and other live stock. 

This seems to be in exact agreement with the decision of 
the 8upreme Court of New York, that no humane society 
has the right to Beiza and destroy dogs without consent of 
owners. 

Overture, an English greyhound, from the kennels of 
Fawcett Brothers in EnglanJ, which arrived here last week 
consigned to C. J. Horrigan, has created a fund of interest- 
ing gossip among the leashmen. The newcomer is credited 
with being the only dog who has ever beaten For Freedom, 
a dog who has not yet lost a course on the local sward. 
Overture is a compactly built red dog, weighing at present 
about sixty-. ix pounds. He is by Sir Sankey out of Fairy 
Fay, she by the famous Hersohel ex Charming Bess. Sir 
Sankey is also the sire of For Freedom. Overture is a litter 
brother of Farmer Flamborough, a dog who has won many 
stakes for the Fawcett Kennels. He was whelped in April, 

1896, and is nearly the same age as For Freedom. His run- 
ning has been done chit fly in Ireland, where he has won a 
number of stakes. He beat For Freedom in the third round 
of the Abber stake for puppies at the Bangor meeting in 

1897. The official record says: "For Freedom was show- 
ing pace on a strong outside, when Overture shot up and 
took first and second turns before the former got in for sev- 
eral close exchanges. As they rose the hill the Irish dog 
(For Freedom) had only slightly the best of them, and, in- 
deed, many thought For Freedom had won." 



Kennel Suggestions. 



We are accustomed to receive from time to time a great 
many inquiries as to the length of time, says ' Our Dogs," 
during which a distemper case may be regarded as contagious 
after the animal affected has recovered. In dealing with 
such a subject perhaps the beet plan will be to review the 
whole question of disinfection as an aid both to the preven- 
tion of disease and its extermination if, unhappily, it should 
break out. First of all, however, we may take it tor granted 
that the safest and likeliest plan to adopt when a dog ha 8 
had distemper and is better, is to place him in quarantine for 
several weeks, and to proceed with the least possible delay to 
adopt such of the likeliest measures as are about to be re- 
corded of disinfecting his kennel and all things pertaining 
thereto. 

It cannot be too forcibly impressed upon dog fanciers that 
the two greatest disinfectants we have are fresh air and fresh 
water. All kennels and runs should be so arranged that 
every nook and corner can be easily got at. Insufficient 
light tends both to dampness and to neglect. The lighter 
and more spacious the kennel is the leee likelihood there 
will be of its inmates suffering from disease, and the easier it 
will be to effect a clearance of the microbe element should 
euch a course be at any time necessary. A plentiful supply 
of fresh air is the greatest safeguard against the multiplication 
of evil microbes. And the abundant washing with clear 
water is equally valuable in its sanitary effects. The ventila- 
tion and cleansing of kennels, therefore, stand first on the 
list of necessary disinfecting precautions. 



Now as regards the various chemical substances commonly 
in use as deodorants and germicides. There has been and 
still is a great de-il of controversy as to the relative merits of 
these preparations, and it is alleged that some of the things 
which are supposed to bedestructive to microbe life not only 
are perfectly harmless to these minute organisms, but what 
is worse, have an injurious effect upon the lungs of animals 
which inhale their cdors. We cannot, however, very well 
enter upon a discussion of scientific theories in this column, 
so we will confine ourselves to describing one or two methods 
of disinfecting upon which there is, so far ss we know, a 
general unanimity of opinion. To take first the commonest 
ot disinfectants, chloride of lime. We have very little faith 
in that being sprinkled about or placed about in open recep- 
tacles. Chloride of lime owes its pungency to the chlorine 
gas which it gives off to the air. This chlorine gas at once 
seeks to unite itself with other elements, and is quickly dis- 
tributed into the surroundirg air, so that unless a very larga 
quantity of the chloride of lime be placed in a given area it 
will not have any marked (fleet. Moreover, chloride of 
lime very soon loses all this chlorine, and remains in a wet 
oljectionable state, which is not consistent with neatness and 
cleanliness. 

The more satisfactory method of using chloride of lime is 
to add some of it to a bucket of water intended for swilling 
out kennel?, etc.; the water will at once dissolve the chlorine 
gas, and the lime will sink to the bottom. This solution 
can, as is easily seen, be made of any strergth practically, 
and although in that form it has not a very markedly power- 
ful effect, it ie safe and useful for the purpose indicated. In 
contradistinction to this we have carbolic acid; this is a most 
dangerous thing to deal with and it has been estimated, we 
think quite correctly, that the number of deaths caused acci- 
dentally in this country by carbolic acid poisoning is almost 
if not quite, equal to the number of all other poisoning cases 
put together. 

There is another thing about carbolic acid which is espec- 
ially worthy of notice by dog fanciers. We have known 
instances of dogs being poisoned by having carbolic acid 
applied to their skins insufficiently diluted. If the acid be 
applied to the skin in its raw state, or if it be swallowed 
accidentally, it has a terrible burning effect, and it is easy to 
see how, when carbolic acid has been added to a bucket of 
water a dog may take a drink from the bucket whicb, by 
reason of the fact that a portion of the acid almost invariably 
comes to the top, will be likely to severely burn his n outh 
arid throat. It is, therefore, just as well (o have this danger 
in view, particularly when, as in this column, we are making 
suggestions for those of limited experience. Undoubtedly 
carbolic acid is very useful and very effective. Its proper 
use is as a wash, well diluted with water, and it is not of 
much use (besides being highly dangerous) to place it about 
in open vessels. Make a fairly strong solution of it, taking 
care that none remains undissolved in the water, and then 
use this with a garden syringe. It may be of interest to add 
that carbolic acid of the proper standard is soluble in about 
twelve hundred times its own volume of water. This fact 
will enable us easily to calculate how much of the acid will 
be required to make a given quantity of the strongest solu- 
tion it is possible to have. 

One word as to carbolic powder such as is usually sold. I t 
has been asserted by eminent authorities that many of the 
commercial samples of carbolic powder are utterly useless 
by reason of the fact that they c*o not obtain free carbolic 
acid and lime, and as such are entirely inert. We therefore 
counsel the inexperienced to place more faith in the aqueous 
solution of the acid as desciibed in the former paragraph 
rather than in any form of carbolic powder. We pass on now 
to permanganate of potassium. This is a chemical which 
rapidly attacks all organic matter, and a very small experi- 
ment will show how very active this apparently inoffensive 
crystal really is. Glycerine is an organic compound. If a 
few crystals of permanganate be added to a little glycerine 
and a few drops of water, a rapid chemical action will be 
noticed. So if permanganate of potassium dissolved in 
water be thrown about and placed about any building, all the 
minute organisms that come into contact with it will be at 
once attacked. There is also this great advantage with per- 
manganate, that it is inodorous; it does not, as some things 
do, cloak a bad smell by its own worse odor —an accusation 
that might almost be levelled at chloride of lime. It will be 
seen that if the interior of a building be syringod well with 
permanganate solution the effect it will have upon the minute 
organisms in the air must be very considerable. So we 
recommend spraying in preference to placing it about. 

Now in regard to the disinfecting of a kennel or other 
building in which we will suppose there has been a dog 
suffering from distemper. In our experience there is only 
one thoroughly effective way of disinfecting such a place, 
and that is by burning sulphur in it. Clear out every pos- 
sible fixture and leave the chamber quite empty. Burn all 
straw, hay and other bedding, sweep down ihe walls and 
generally clear out the place. Then close up effectually 
doors, windows, ventilators, etc., and having set fire to a good 
heap of sulphur, place in an old bucket or, what is easier to 
handle, upon a shovel, set it down in the centre of th e 
chamber, and let it remain there until a few hours have 
elapsed. The deadly sulphurous gases will permeate every 
crack, and no fear need be entertained as to risk of contagion 
to any animal placed in subsequently. 



Standards. 

The points and description of the Pomeranian or8pilz dog, 
as drawn up by the English Pomeranian Club, are as follows: 

Appearance — The Pomeranian in build and appearance 
should be a compact short-coupled dog, well knit in frame. 
His head and face should be fox-like, with small erect ears 
that appear sensible to every sound. He should exhibit 
great intelligence in his expression.docility in his disposition, 
and activity and buoyancy in his deportment. 

Head— Somewhat foxy in outline, or wedge-shaped, the 
skull being slightly flat (although in the Toy varieties the 
skull may be rather rounder), large in proportion to the 
muzzle, v. hich should finish rather fine, and be free from 
lippiness. The teeth should be level, and on no account 
undershot. The head in its profile may exhibit a little 
"stop," which, however, must not be too pronounced, and 
the hair on head and face must be smooth or short-coated. 

Eyes— Should be medium in size, rather oblique in shape, 
not set too wide apart, bright and dark in color, showing 
great intelligence and docility in temper. 

Ears— Should be small, and carried perfectly erect or 
pricked, like those of a fox, an I, like the head, should be 
covered with soft short hair. No plucking or trimming is 
allowable. 

Nose— In black, black and tan, or white dogs the nose 
should be black; in other colored Pomeranians it may often 
be brown or liver colored, but in all cases the nose must be 
self not parti-colored, and never white. 

Neck and Shoulders— The neck, if anything, should be 
rather short, well set in, and iron like, covered with a profuse 
mane and frill of long, straight glossy hair, sweeping from 
the under jiw and covering the whole of the front part of 
the shoulders and chest as well as flowing on ihe top part of 
the shoulders. The shoulders must be tolerably clean and 
laid well back. 

Body — The back must be short, and the body compact, 
being well ribbed up and the barrel well rounded. The 
chest must be fairly deep and not too wide. 

Legs— The forelegs must be perfectly straight, of medium 
length, not such as would be termed either "leggy" or "low 
on leg." but in due proportion in length and strength to a 
well balanced frame, and the forelegs and thighs must be 
well feathered, the feet small and compact in shape. 

Tail— The tail is a characteristic of the breed, and should 
be well twisted right up from the root tightly over the back, 
or lying flat on the back slightly on either side, and profusely 
covered with long hair, spreading out and flowing over the 
back. 

Coat— Properly speaking there should be two coats, an 
under and over coat, and the outer a long, perfectly straight 
and glistening coat, covering the whole of the body, being 
very abundant around the neck and fore part of the shoulders 
and chest, where it should form a frill of long flowing hair 
extending over the shoulders as previously described. The 
hindquarters, like chose of the collie, should be similarly 
clad with long hair or feathering from the top of the rump 
to the hocks The hair on the tail must be, as previously 
described, profuse and flowing over the back. 

Color — The following colors are admissible: White, black, 
blue, brown, black and tan, fawn, sable, red and parti-colors. 
The whites must be quite free from lemon or any color, and 
the blacks, blues, browns, black and tans and reds free from 
white. A few white hairs in any of Ihe self-colors shall not 
absolutely ditqualify, but should carry great weight againBt a 
dog. In parti-colored dogs, the colors should be evenly dis- 
tributed on the body. Whole colored dogs with a white foot 
or feet, leg or legs, are decidedly objectionable and should be 
discouraged, and cannot compete as whole colored specimens. 
In mixed classes, i e , where whole colored and parti colored 
Pomeranians compete together the preference should, if in 
other points they are equal, be given to the whole colored 
specimens. 

N. B. — Where classification by weight is made the follow- 
ing scale, the most suitable division, should be adopted by the 
Show Committees: 

1. Not exceeding 81b. (Toys). 2. Exceeding 81b. 

Where classificalijn by color is made, the following should 
be adepted: 

1. Black. 2. White. 3 Any color other than white 
or black. 

SCALE OF POINTS. 



Appearance 15 

Head 6 

EveB 6 

Ears 5 

Nose 5 

Neck and ishouWlers 5 



Body 10 

Legs 5 

Tall 10 

Coat 25 

Color 10 



Grand Total 100 



Kennel Registry. 



Visits, Sales, Whelps and Names Claimed published In this column 
free of charge. Please use the following form : 
VISITd. 

Fay and Gleason's bull terrier bitch Woodcote Queen 
(Woodcote Venom — Jeu) to A. Joseph's Bloomsbury Baron 
(8herbourne King — Bloomsbury Butterfly) December 26, 

28, 1899. 

WHELPS. 

F. W. Worthington's greyhound bitch Sometime (Olden 
W — Border's Valentine) whelped January 2, 1900, ten pup- 
pies — 5 dogs — to J. J. Edmund's Whiskey Hill (Firm 
Friend — Valley Queen). 



[January 6, 1900 



THE FARM. 



Brown Swiss Oattle. 



Aek nine out of ten men you meet who are 
reasonably well informed on cattle breeding, 
"what are the characteristics of the Brown 
Swiss breed?" and they will tell you they 
never heard of it. Down in Santa Barbara 
county in this State there are a few of this 
breed of dairy cattle, but so far as we know j 
the first ever brought to this part of the State 
are a couple of calves purchased from an ex- 
hibitor at the Minnesota Htate Fair last sum- 
mer by Mrs. C. Coil of Woodland, Yolo Co.,, 
and shipped to her son H. E. Coil, Esq 
a prominent farmer and dairyman of the 
county mentioned. These calves are duly 
registered in the books of the Brown 8wiss 
Breeders Association by the names McKinley 
and Minnesota. Mr. Coil has kindly furnished 
the Breeder- and Sportsman with photo- 
graphs of the calves taken last month when 
they were about seven months old, but the 
picture of the bull was not clear enough to 
reproduce. The heifer, Minnesota, it is plain 
to be seen, is a very handsome animal, and 
we hope that under Mr. Coil's care the two 
may grow and thrive and found a profitable 
and prolific Brown Swiss colony in Yolo. 
Mr. Coil is one of the Directors of the cele- 
brated Woodland Creamery, and furnishes to 
it the milk from about fifty cows daily. He 
is breeding up bis stock, having started with 
grade cattle and will soon have a fine dairy 
herd. The following particulars of the 
Brown Swiss cattle were taken from the report 
of Henry E. Alvord, Chief of the Dairy 
Division of the U. S. Bureau of Animal 
Industry: 

Origin and history. — Switzerland has 
been famous as a dairying country for some 
centuries. It is especially noted for cheese, 
and it is said that seventeen different kinds 
are regularly exported to other countries. 
Two distinct races of cattle contribute to 
these products, and both are excellent dairy 
animals. In many respects they are un- 
equaled by any of the other breeds of conti- 
nental Europe. 

The Brown Swiss is the breed better known 
in the United States. It is called also Brown 
Switzer, but more properly Brown Schwyzsr, 
from the Canton Schwyz, where the breed 
originated, or, at least, has been bred longest 
and is still found of truest type. It is now 
common to the other cantons of eastern and 
•entral Switzerland and has a find reputation 
throughout Europe. These cattle have been 
especially successful as prizs winners at Paris, 
Hamburg, and other large exhibitions of live 
stock. 

The first pure-bred animals of this breed 
brought to the United States comprised one 
bull and seven heifers, imported from the 
Canton Schwyz to Massachusetts in the 
autumn of 1869. It was not till 1881 or 1882 
that other importations were made, but mean- 
while this first little herd had been kept pure 
and had increased to nearly two hundred in 
number. During the years 1882 and 1883 
several importations were made and there 
have been a number since. Where they have 
become known these cattle have made a 
favorable impression among dairymen, and 
herds of different sizjs can now be found in 
States of all parts of the Union. 



Characteristics. — The Brown Swiss may 
be placed in the second class as to size among 
the distinctly dairy breeds They are sub- 
stantial, fleshy, and well proportioned, with 
very straight, broad back, heavy legs and 
neck, giving a general appearance of coarse- 
ness. But when examined they are found to 
be small-boned for their eizs and to possess a 
fine, silky coat, and rich, elastic ekin, with 
other attractive dairy points. Although 
generally described as being brown in color, 
the brown runs through various shades and 
often into a mouse color, and sometimes 
a brownish dun, especially for the saddle or 
body. Head, neck, legs and quarters are 
usually darkest in color, often almost black. 
The nose, tongue, hoofs, and switch are qu'te 
black. Characteristic markings of the breed 
include a mealy band around the muzzle, with 
a light stripe across the lips and up the sides 
of the nostrils, a light-colored tuft of hair be- 
tween the horns, and a light-colored stripe 
extending all the way along the back to the 
tail. The eyes are full and mild, but bright, 




Brown Swigs Heifer "Minnesota." 

Owned by H. E. Coll of Woodland CM. 



usually black. The horns rather small, white 
waxy, curving forward and inward, with 
black tips. The ears are large, round, and 
lined with long, silky hair, light in color. 
The barrel of the body is large and well 
rounded. The udder and teats are large, well 
formed and white, with milk veins very 
prominent. The cows often carry rernirk- 
ably well-shaped escutcheons. The animals 
of a herd are generally even in appearance, 
showing careful breeding extending through 
many generations. Bulls and caws are alike 
docile and easily managed. The cows are so 
plump and compact as to appear smaller than 
they really are. Mature animals weigh from 
1200 to 1400 pounds and often more; bulls 
run up to 1800 pounds and over, yet are not 
so much heavier than the females as in most 
breeds. These cattle are extremely hardy 
and very attractive for their size, being neces- 
sarily good mountain climbers in their native 
country. 

Milk and butter records. — Developed 
as a dairy breed primarily, Brown Swiss cows 
yield a generous flow of milk and holdout 
well. Qood specimens may be expected to 
give an average of ten quarts for every day 
in the year. Six thousand pounds a year is 
an ordinary record, and single instances are 
known of 8000 to 10,000 pounds. One Swiss 
cow owned in Massachusetts produced, by 
accurately recorded weights, 86,304 pounds 



of milk before 12 years old. The quality of 
milk is above the European average, 3J to 4 
per cent of fat being usual. The cow men- 
tioned above made a butter record ranging 
from 500 pounds to 610 pounds per year for 
four years, but this was exceptional. Ordinar- 
ily 22 pounds of milk of this breed will make 
1 pound of butter, and sometimes it does 
better. 

The description given indicates that these 
cattle are good for beef as well as for the 
dairy. They are almost always full- fleshed, 
easily kept so, and readily fattened when not 
in milk. The flesh is said to be fine-grained, 
tender and sweet. A barren heifer in Min- 
nesota weighed 16S0 pounds; a mature cow in 
New York, fattened for butcher, weighed 
1925 pounds, and made 151E pounds of beef. 
A pair o> Swiss steers at 13 months old 
weighed 2200 pounds. The calves are large, 
often 100 pounds at birth, and make a vigor- 
ous growth. Weights of 400 to 600 pounds 
at 4 to 6 months of age are not uncommon 
Altogether, the Brown Swiss is able to present 
about as strong a claim as any breed to being 
a profitable, ''general purpose cow." 

In (heir native country these cattle are or- 
dinarily fed nothing but hay, grass or other 
green forage, throughout the year, but they 
respond promptly to more various and gener- 
ous feeding. 

A Deal in Sheep. 



J. 6. Johnson, the San Francisco buyer 
who is getting nearly all the sheep and hogs 
in this section of the county, purchased 4000 
sheep from Churchill & Martin of Siskiyou 
county, paying $3 for wethers and $2 for 
lambs. About 900 yearlings and two year 
old were too light for his use and these were 
purchased by Major E. H. WarH. They were 
shipped to Nord where Mr. Johnson wanted 
te use the same cars in shipping some 3200 
head of wethers that he purchased from Mr. 
Ward a couple of weeks ago. The 900 head 
purchased by Mr. Ward are being driven 
from Nord to his range east of Vina. — Red 
Bluff Sentinel- ^ 

Baron Paul Vietinghoff, a representative of 
the Russian Government, is in Chicago buy- 
ing horses for the Czar's army. The Baron 
says that already 1000 American horses, pur- 
chased principally in Kentucky and Virginia, 
have been shipped to Russia and that another 
1000 are to follow as soon as the Baron makes 
the selections. "Not only am I buying horses 
for the army," he said, "but for breeding pur- 
poses as well. The animals shipped for mili- 
tary use go merely as an experiment. They 
will be divided into lots of four and six in 
different garrisons and given a trial." 



Oolor in Horses. 



' It is carious that chestnut was formerly 
one of the objectionable colors in market 
horsee. Time was when a horse of any of the 
various shades of chestnut would be discounted 
in price in the markets, but that unwarranted 
prejudice has wholly disappeared. It was the 
same with the grays. A decade ago a great 
craze sprang up for black draft stallions and 
the grays from France were discriminated 
against sharpl: in buying stallions; but as a 
matter of fact a well matched pair of dapple 
gray horses will spring the price a little over 
any other color at present, and this has been 
the case for some time. The prejudice against 
grays was a natural one, as it is a color that 
B hows stain and dirt, but there never was the 
least reason at the bottom of the discrimina- 
tion against the chestnut color either in draft 
or carriage horses. 

"The fact may here be noted that the use 
of the word sorrel as describing this color is 
now almost wholly confined to the country. 
At the market places and in the show ring 
and in sale catalogues] horses of this color are 
called chestnuts. They are variously de_ 
scribed accoiding to the hue as 'light chest, 
nut,' 'dark chestnut,' or 'liver colored chest- 
nut,' or 'black chestnut.' The country term 
is frequently 'chestnut sorrel,' although why 
both words should be used is past finding out. 
In some sections a light chestnut is called a 
sorrel, and horses of darker shades are termed 
chestnuts. It would be the part of wisdom to 
drop the use of the word sorrel on account of 
its indefiniteness and use the word chestnut, 
qualifying it with 'light,' 'dark' or 'liver col- 
ored,' as the occasion may demand. 

"It is a very popular color in carriage 
horses, and some of our most famous saadle 
horses are of shades of ^chestnut. 

"A chestnut roan is about as 'swell' a color 
as a blue roan for carriage work. Light and 
'washy' chestnuts are not so popular, but any- 
thing of a hard shade is ready sale if the 
horse is all right." 



Spavlno, Ringbones, Splints, Curbs, and 
All Forms of Lameness Yield to 




Works thousands of cures annually. Endorsed by the 
best breeders and horsemen everywhere. Prlrr, 91; six 
for $5. As a liniment for family use it has no equal. 
Ask your druinrist for Kendall's Spavin Cure, also 
'•A Treatise on the Horse.** the book free, or address 
OR. I. J. KENDALL COMPANY, EN0SBURQ FALLS, VT. 




JAY-EYE-SEPES 



Mr. J. L Case, (Hickory Grove Fnrm, home e? 
of Jay-Eye-See) Ha^ine, Wis., says: "After try- £ 
lug every kuowu remedy, I removed a largo fc 
Hunch of two years standing from a 8-year-old & 
filly, with three applications of 



H 



Quinn's Ointment , 

It is the best preparation I have ever used or heard fl 



of. I heartily recommend tt to all Horsemen.' 
H'e have hundreds of such testimonial*, 
Tl.SO prr Pneliage. 

our Druggist for it, if lie does not keep It we 
nd prepaid on receipt of price. Address PS*; 

EDDY & CO. , Whitehall, N. Y. 




SPLAN £ NEWGASS' NEXT SALE 

Union Stock Yards, Chicago, 

WILL TAKE PLACE 

JANUARY 29, 3 0. 31, and FEB RUARY I, 2, 3, 1900. 

We want matured horses with size, manners, good color, speed and action enough to be useful 
for track, road, family or coach use. Good horses in any of these classes will bring top prices 
at our sale. Cheap animals of any kind will not be accepted. Milo Knox of Haywards it 
looking after our interests in California. See him about consigning your horses to us. 

SPLAN & NEWGASS. 




Januaby 6, 1900J 



13 



BRIGHTON BEACH 




Brighton Beach, Coney Island, New York. 

And the following Stakes are now open to close and name on THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 1900. 



FOR SEASON OF 1900. 



FIRST ATTEMPT STAKES. 

For two years old. of $30 each, $10 forfeit, with 
81000 added, ot which $200 to the second and $100 to 
the third; winners of S2500 to carry 3 lbs. extra: 
twice of $2500 or once of $5000,5 lbs. extra; non- 
winners of $1500 allowed 7 lbs.; of $1000, 10 lbs 
Maidens allowed 15 lbs. Five furlongs. 

THE UNDERGRADUATE STAKES. 

For two years old, of $!0 each, $10 forfait, with 
$1000 added, of which 8200 to the second and $100 to 
the third ; winners of $4000 or two races of $.000, 3 
lbs extra; of J750O or two races of $5000. 5 lbs extra; 
or of a race of $10,000, 7 lbs. extra; non-winners of 
$1500 allowed 7 lbs., of $1000, 12 lbs; Maidens 
allowed 15 lbs. Five and a half furlongs. 

THE WINGED FOOT HANDICAP. 

For two years old. of $30 each, or only $10 if de- 
clared out by 2 p. M. on the day before the day ap- 
pointed for the race, with 81000 added, of which $200 
to the second and $100 to ihe third;weigbts to be pub- 
lished ou the second day before the race. Five 
furlongs. 

THE ELECTRIC HANDICAP. 

For fillies two years old, of $30 each, or only $10 if 
declared out by 2 p. m. on the day belore the day 
appointed for the race, with 81000 added, of which 
$2(i0 to the second $100 to the third; weights to be 
published on the second day before the race. 
Three-quarters of a mile. 

THE DISTAFF STAKES. 

For fillies two years old, of $30 each, $10 forfeit, 
with 81000 added, of which 8200 to the second and 
$100 to the third: winners of $^000 to carry 3 lbs. 
extra; twice of $2000 or once of $1000,5 lbs, extra; 
non-winners of $1500 allowed 5 lbs.: of $10U0. 7 lbs. 
Maidens allowed 10 lbs, Five and a half fur- 
longs. 

THE SPINSTER STAKES. 

For fillies two years old.of 830 each, 810 forfeit.with 
$1000 added, ol which $200 to the second and $100 to 
to the third; winners of $2000 to carry 3 lbs. extra; 
twice of 82000 or once of SlOOO. 5 lbs. extra; non-win- 
ners of $I5jO allowed 5 lbs ; of $1000, 7 lbs. Maidens 
allowed 12 lbs. Three-quarters of a mile 

THE RISING GENERATION STAKES. 

For two years old, 830 each, $10 forfeit, with $1000 
added, of which $200 to the second and $100 to the 
third ; a winner of $2 i to carry 3 lbs ; twice, 5 lbs. 
extra; non-winners of $1500 allowed 5 lbs.; or, if not 
more than $1000, 10 lbs. Maidens allowed 15 lbs 
Three-quarters of a mile 



THE ATLANTIC STAKES. 

For two years old, of $30 each,$10 forfeit.with $1250 
added, of which $200 to the second and $100 to the 
third; weight 5 lbs. below scale; winners of $2500 
3 lbs. extra: twice of $2500 or once of SI0D0, 5 lbs. 
extra ; thrice of $25C0,twice of $1000, or once of $7500, 
8 lbs. ext'a: non-winners of $1500 allowed 7 lbs.; 
of $1000, allowed 10 lbs.; of 8600. allowed 12 lbs. 
Maidens allowed 14 lbs. Six furlongs. 

THE CHOICE STAKES. 

(3ellinpr) for two years old, of $30 each, $10 forfeit, 
with 81000 added, of which $2C0 to the second and 
8100 to the third; the winner to be sold at auction 
for $1000; if entered to be sold by 2 p. m. on the day 
before the day appointed for the race for $i0C0, al- 
lowed 5 lbs ; if tor $2000. 10 lbs.; or if for.SlOOO, 18 lbs 
Three-quarters of a mile. 

THE MONTAUK STAKES. 

For two years old, of 850 each, half forfeit, or only 
$15 if declared by June 1st; the Associaiion to mate 
the gross value of the race $3000, of which $3u0 to 
the second and $200 to the third; non-winners of 
82509 allowed 5 lbs.; of $1500 allowed 7 lbs.; of 81000 
allowed 12 lbs ; of $600 allowed 15 lbs. Six fur- 
longs. 

THE NAUTILUS STAKES. 

For three years old, of $15 each, $10 forfeit, with 
$1200 added, of which $200 to the second and 8U0 
to the third; non-winners In 1900 of $2000 allowed 
7 lbs.; of $1000. 10 lbs.; of $700, 15 lbs. One mile 
and a sixteenth 

THE SARAGOSSA STAKES. 

For fillies three years old, of $35 each, $10 forfeit, 
with $1200 added, ot which 8200 to the second and 
$100 to the third; winne s in 1900 of $2000 or t*o 
races of $1500 to carry 3 lbs. extra; non-winners in 
1900 of 81500 allowed 3 lbs. ; of $1000, 10 lbs ; of $600 
12 lbs. Maidens allowed 15 lbs. One mile. 

THE SEA GULL HANDICAP. 

For three years old, of $35 each, or only 810 it 
declared by 2 p. M. on the day before the day ap- 
pointed for the race, with 81200 added, ot which 
$200 to the second and $100 to the third ; weights to 
be published on the second day before the race. 
One mile. 

THE GLEN COVE HANDICAP. 

For three years old, of $35 each, or only $10 if de- 
c!a-ed by 2 p. M. on the day before the day ap- 
pointed for the race, with $i200 added, of which 
$200 to the second and $100 to the third; weights 
to be published ou the second day before the race. 
One mile and a sixteenth. 



THE BAItVLON .STAKES. 

(•telling) for three years old. of $30 each, $10 forfeit, 
with 8100O added, of which 8200 to the second aud 
$100 to the third; the winner to be sold at auction 
for $5000, if entered to be sold by 2pm on the 
dav before the day appoiuted for the race for 81000 
allowed 5 lhs.: if for $3000, 10 lb* ; if for $2000, 15 
lbs.; if for $1000, 22 lb8. Seven furlongs. 

THE PECONIC STAKES. 

For three years old, of 835 each, $10 forfeit, with 
$1500 added, of which $300 to the Becoud and $200 
to the third; winners In 1900 of two races of $2500 
or one of S5L00 to carry 3 lbs extra; non-winners in 
1900 of 82'iOU allowed 3 lbs. ; of $2000, 5 lbs. : of $1000, 
10 lbs. ; of $700, 12 lbs. : non-winners in 1900 allowed 
15 lbs. One mile and a furlong. 

THE SEAGATE STAKES 

Of $3000, for three years old, of $50 each, half for- 
feit, or only $15 if declared by June 1st; the Associa- 
tion to add an amount to make the gross value of 
the race $3000, of which §300 to the second and $200 
to the third; horses which have never won $5000 
allowed, if non-winners of 8^500 in 1900, 7 lbs.; of 
$1500, 10 lbs. : of $1000. 12 lbs.; of $700, 15 lbs. One 
mile and a quarter. 

THE TEST HANDICAP. 

Of $55 each, or only $10 if declared out by 2 p. M. 
on the day belore the day appointed f jr the race, 
with $1200 added, of which Si00 to the second and 
$100 to the third; weights to be published on the 
second day before the race. One mile. 

THE FLIGHT HANDICAP. 

For all ages. Of $35 each, or only $10 if declared 
out by 2 p m. on the day before the day appointed 
for the race, with $l2C0added, of which $200 to the 
second and 8 00 to the third; weights to be published 
on the second day before the race. Three-quar- 
ters of a mile. 

THE BRIGHTON CUP. 

Of $100 each, or only $2") if declared out by May 
loth; starters to pav $100 addilional; with 85000 
added, of which 81500 to the second and the third 
save his stakes; two horses in different interests to 
start or no race. Two miles and a quarter. 

THE SEA CLIFF STAKES. 

For all ages, of $35 each, $10 forfeit, with $1000 
added, of wnich $200 to the second and $100 to the 
third; non-winnerB in 1900 of $2000 allowed 3 lbs., 
unless they have won three or more races in 1900; 
non-winners of $1500 allowed 5 lbs , unless they 
have won three or more races in 1900; non-winners 
of $1000 allowed 7 lbs , unless they have won three 
or more races in 1900; non-winners in 1900, if three 



years old or upward, allowed 12 lbs. Maidens o 
three yeara old or upward allowed 15 lbs. Six 
furlongs. 

THE ISLIP STAKES. 

For three yearn olds and upward, of $50 each, half 
forfeit, or only $15 if decla>ed June 1st, with $1500 
added, of which $300 to the second and $200 to the 
third; non-winners in 1900 of $;. r >00 or four races of 
any value allowed 7 lbB ; of $1: 00 or three races of 
any value allowed 10 lbs ; of $1000 or two races of 
any value allowed 14 lbs. Maidens allowed 20 lbs. 
One mile. 

THE JAMAICA STAKES. 

For three years old and upward, $35 each, $10 for- 
feit, with $1000 added, of which $200 to the second 
and $100 to the third; non-winners in 1900 of $1500, 
unless they have wo i two or more races in 1900. 
allowed 3 lbs ; non-winners in 1900 of 81C00 allowed 
5 lbs., unless they have won two or more races in 
1900; non-winner6 of $700 allowed 10 lbs , unless 
they have won three or more races In 1900; non- 
winners in 1900 allowed 15 lbs. The winner of the 
Sea Cliff Stakes to carry 5 lbs. extra. Seven 
furlongs. 

THE PUNCHESTOWN STAKES. 

A Handicap Steeplechase, for four years old and 
upward, of $35 each, or only $10 if declared by 2 p. 
M. on the day before the day appointed for the race; 
with $750 added, of which $200 to the second and 
$100 to the third ; weights to be published on the 
second day before the race. The Full Course. 

THE CHANTILLY STAKES. 

A Handicap Hurdle Rack, for three years old 
and upward, of $35 each, or only $10 if declared by 
2 p. M on the day before the racf; with $750 added, 
of which $200 to the second and $100 to the third: 
weights to be published on the second day before 
the race. One mile and a half, over six 
hurdles. 

THE BRIGHTON HANDICAP. 

A handicap for three years old and upward. Of 
$200 each, h f , or onlv $15 if declared by February 
20, 1900, with $'i000 added, of which $1000 to the 
second and $500 to the third; weights to be an- 
nounced February 1, 1900; winners, after the an- 
nouncement of the weignts, of two races of $600, or 
one of $1200, to carry 4 lbs. extra; of two of $1200 or 
one of $2400. 8 lbB. extra; of three of $1200 on wo of 
$2100 or one of $1800, 12 lbs extra. In the case of 
horBes handicapped at 115 lbs. or over, these penal- 
ties shall apply" to Ihe extent of one-halt ouly; in 
the case of those handicapped at 122 lbs. or over, to 
the extent of one-quarter only ; and in the case of 
those handicapped at 130 lbs. or over, they shall not 
apply. One mile and a quarter. 



N. B —Winner of a certain sum means winner of a single race of that value. Weight for age means standard weight, according to the Rules of the Course where the race is run, or its conditions. 
The Rules of Racing and subsequent amendments thereto adopted by the Jockey Club govern all races (except Hurdle Races and Steeplechases) run under the auspices of the Brighton Beach 
Racing Association. 

Entries to either or all of the race) advertised will be received only with the understanding, and on the agreement of the subscriber, that the provisions of Racing Rules 42 and 43 (hereto appended) 
form a part of and govern the contract. 

Rule 42.— Rules of Racing.) Every person subscribing to a sweepstakes, or entering a horse in a race to be run under these rules, accepts the decision of the Stewards on any question relating to 
a race, or to racing. Rule 43.— At the discretion of the Stewards of the Jockey Club, or of the Stewards, and without notice, the entries of any person, or the transfer ot any entry, may be refused. 
The Rules of Racing adopted by tne National Steeplechase Association govern all Hurdle Races and Steeplechases run under the auspices of the Brighton Beach Racing Association. 



In making up the Programme for the Meeting of 1900 the Stakes and Handicaps will be so arranged as to give owners an opportunity to run without sacrifice of interest 
The Association reserves the right to start any or all of the races announced in this Circular with or without the aid of a starting device. 
Nominations should be addressed: Secretary, Brighton Beach Racing Association, 315 Montague Street, Brooklyn, N. T 



T M. JACKSON, Secretary. 



WILLIAM A. ENGEMAN, President 



Do You Want a Camera? 



Takes a Picture 




The Gem Poco 
4x3 




FOR THREE NEW SUBSCRIBERS TO THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE GEM POCO is a 4x5 camera, constructed witli a universal or fixed 
focus lens that will take a picture cfear and sharp at the outer edge as well 
as at the center This was deemed an impossibility until last season, when 
the GEM POCO demonstrated that it could be done. And yet no others 
have succeeded in obtaining this much desired result. 

It is covered with fine Morocco grain leather, has leather handle, two tripod 
plates, and two large brilliant oblong view finders, made in proportion to the 
plate, which insures the correct position of the views. 



It is equipped with a newly discovered fixed focus GEM lens, constructed on 
an entirely new principle, giving a great deptli of focus, cutting the plates 
clear and sharp to their full size, together with roUry diaphragm with three 
aperture?, Rochester safety shutter arranged for time or instantaeous expos ■ 
tires, and speed regulator. 

As all working parts are made (lush with the camera box, there is no possi-* 
bility of their becoming broken or getting out of order. 



Any one sending us three new yearly subscribers, accompanied by the cash ($9.00), will be sent a GEM POCO. 
If you intend to get up a club, send for sample copies, to be used in canvassing, or send us a list of names of people 
you intend to see, and sample copies will be sent to them from this office. BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

22-24 Geary Street - San Francisco, Cal. 

P. S.— The Net Price of This Camera is $5, and Will be Furnished f or that Amount in Cash 



©Jje greener mtfc ^rcm*mctn* 



[January 6, 1900 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High-Class Harness 

AND 

Saddle Horses 



HAMBLETONIAN WILKES 



No. 1679). 



Sire of 

Phoebe Wilkes 2£S\i 

Tommy Me 2:1 Ihi 

New Era 2:13 

Sibyl 8 2:16% 

Salville 2:17% 

Rocker 2:11% 

i ArliDe Wilkes 2:ll>4 

Aeroplane...*. 2:16;^ 

Grand George 2:18 

J. F Hanson 2:19'^ 

Brown Bess 2:24% 

And 19 others better than 
2:30,' and B producing sons 
and 6 producing daughters. 



BREED TO A 
GREAT SIRE OF 
RACE HORSES. 

1 HAMBLETONIAN WILKES, by George Wilkes 2:22, dam 
Mag Lock, by American Star; second dam Lady Irwin (grandam of 
Lumps 2:21), by Hambletonian 10; third dam Daughter ot Roe's Ab- 
dallah Chief. 

SEASON OF 1900 $50. 

dual return privilege: excellent pasturage and best ot care taken of 
mares, $1 per month, at Green Meadow Farm, Address 

R. I. MOORHEAD, 
. Green Meadow Farm, Santa Clara, Cal 



DIRECT 2:051-2 



sire or 



Directum Kelly, 2 :08 1-4 WM 



Directly - - - 2:031- 
Miss Margaret - 2:11 1-2 
Ed B. Young - - 2:11 1-4 
I Direct - - - - 2:13 
Miss Beatrice - 2:13 1-4 

And 13 ither Standard Trotters and Pacers 
Terms, $100 the Season 

Is now in the stud at HEATING'S STABLES 
at Pleasanton, California track. 

Excellent pasturage and the best of care taken of 
mares in any mauuer that owucrs "may desire at 
reasonable rates. Apply to 

THOMAS E. KEATING, Pleasanton, C a 




Western Turf Association 

TANFORAN PARK 

Third Meeting from JAN. 1st to JAN. 
20th, 1900, inclusive. 

Six high-class running races every week- 
day, rain or shine, beginning at 
1:30 P. M. 

The ideal winter race track of America. Patrons 
stepdirectly from the railroad cars into a cupeib 
grand ttaud, glass-enclosed, where comfortably 
boused in bad weather they can enjoy an unob- 
structed view of the races. 

Trains leave Third and Townsend Streets at 9:00. 
10:40 and 11:30 a. m., and 12:15. 12:35. 12:50 and 1:25 
p. m . returning immediately after the last race and 
at 4:15 p. M. Rear cars reserved for women and 
their escorts. No smoking. Valencia Street 10 
minutes later. 

San Jose and Way Station*. Arrive at San 
Bruno at 12:15 v. M. Leave San Bruno at 4:00 and 
4:45 p. x. 

RATES— San Francisco to Tanforan and return, 
including admission to track, 81.25. 

F. H. GREEN, 
Sec'y and Man'gr. 



w. 



J. MARTIN, 
President. 



Alameda Sale and Training Stables, 

Stallions for Service, Season 1900 



Alameda 

J. M. NELSON 



California. 

Proprietor. 



ALTAMONT 3600 ARTHUR W. 2:11 1-2 



(By Alnaont 33. Dam, Sue Ford by 
Brown Chief) 

SIRE OF 

CHEH ALIS 3:04 1-4 

DEL NORTE 2:08 

ELLA T 2:08 1-4 

DOC Sl'EKRY 2:09 

PATHMONT 2:09 1-4 

ALTAO 2:09 3-4 

ALAMEDA 2:15 

DECEIVER 2:15 

TOUCHET _ 2:15 

CARRIE S 2:17 1-2 

and 31 others in the 2:30 list. " 

Terms for the Season - [$60 

With Usual Return Privilege?. 



Sire WAYLAND W. 2 12 1-2 by Arthur 

Wilkes 2:28 1-2. 
Dam LADY MOOR (dam of Arthur W. 

2:11 1-3. John A. (3) 
2:14. Maud P. (3) 2:26' £ 
trial 8:18 1-2), by 
Grand Moor: second 
dam by Finch'! Glen- 
coe, son of imp, Glen- 
<•(>«-: third dam by 
Williamson's Belmont 
Arthur W. is the banrlsomest horse of his size in 
California, being a rich brown seal in color, stand- 
ing 16.? and weighing 1200 lbs He has been a 
money winner every year of the three he has been 
campaigued and during the season of 1899 won two 
first moneys, two seconds, one third and one fourth, 
and reduced his record U>2:1M*> He will be cam- 
paigned ag'in in 19,0 and will pace in 2:C6 Bure. 
Consequently he will be limiied to 10 approved 
mares. 

Terms for the Season - $40 

With Usual Return Privileges. 



Good Pasturage at reasonable rates Horses bought, sold and trained for road 
or track. Apply to or addres3 

J. M. NELSON. 

Cor. St. Charles St., and Eagle Avenue, 

Alameda, California. 



GAFF TOPSAIL 2:17^ 

Will Make the Season of 1900 at the Vallejo Race Track. 

TERMS $25 FOR THE SEASON 

Only son of Diablo standing for public service in Solano Co. Gsff Topsail is one of the fastest horses 
In the stale: li absolutely sound and has perfect legs and feet 

Gaff Topsail Is by Diablo, dam Belle by Ancona 730, son oi Almont 33: second dam Stridgham by 
Jim Lied, son of Homer, he by Mambriuo Palcheu; third dam by Hilly Cheatham, thoroughbred. 

Free Purse $250 for Gaff Topsail Three=Year=0lds. 

I will gi te a purse of (20 entrance fee for foals of 1901 sired by Gail Topsail, mares covered 1900 to te 
competed for in 1901 at the Vallejo Race Track. 

EDW. KAVANAQH, Box 366, Vallejo, Cal. 



GOOD YOUNG ROADSTERS FOR SALE. 

On account ot the scarcity of cars I find it impos- 
sible to take all the horses in my string at Qilroy to 
New York, and have a lew well broke, sound and 
handsome young roadsters for sale here. For prices 
apply to or call on BUDD DOBLE, 

Gilroy, Cal. 



For Sale. 



Two mares, RUBIE, ch m (4) by Elyria 5729, 
2:25H. son of the great Mambilno King. JENNIE, 
ch m (11), thoroughbred, by Intruder. Mares can 
be teen at Palo Alto. 

E. G. DYER, 
Falo Alto, Cal. 



PLEASANTON 

Training Track Association. 



I The following list of horses trained and developed on the track, 
together with records obtained, will speak forcibly as to the great 
advantages oflered to the patrons of the track, no records over 2:12 
being Included. 



This track, celebrated all 
over the State as much 
for its splendid condition, 
despite all the changes of 
weather, as for its superb 
climate, has passed into 
new hands. Two hundred 
splendid new box stalls 
have been erected and the 
most thorough system of 
water laid on, conveying 
water to all stalls. The 
track itself has been thor- 
oughly overhauled and put 
in to the best shape pos- 
sible. The association is 
now ready to receive 
horses. 



SEARCHLIGHT, 2:03 1-4. 

ANACONDA, 2:03 1-4. Champion pacing gelding ol the world 
to date. 

DIRECTLY, 2:03 1-4. Two year old record champion, 2:07V 
Three year old record champion, 2:07. 

ALIX, 2:03 3-4. Champion mare, champion race record of the 

world for three beats. 2:06^, 2:05)4, 2:05%. 

FLYING JIR, 2 :04. 1.59VJ to pole 

AZOTE, 2:04 3-4. Champion gelding of the world to date. 
DIRECTUM, 2:05 1-4. Champion stallion ot the world to date. 
DIRECT, 2:05 1-2. Champion pacer of his time 
KLATAWAH, 2:05 1-2. Three year old. 
LENA N., 2:05 1-2. Champion pacing mare of 1898. 
CONEf, 2:07 3-4. 
DIONE, 2:09 1-4. 

DIABLO. 2 :09 1-4. As a four year old. 
CRICKET, 2:10. Record for pacing mare at that time. 
LITTLE ALBERT, 2:10. 

SAN PEDRO, 2:10. Winner of three races and 16000 in one week. 
GOLD LEAF, 2:11. Champion three year old of her time. 
VENUS II, 2:11 1-4. 
OWYHEE, 2:11 1-4. 
MONBARS, 2:11 1-4. As a three year old . 
CALYLE CARNE, 2:11 3-4. 

MARGARET S-, 2:12. Winner of last Horseman's Great Ex- 
pectation Stakes, (10,000 in coin and a (200 cup. 

Address C. B. CHARLESW0RTH, Pleasanton, Alameda County, Cal. 



RENTALS— 82 per month 
Special large boxes for studs. 

etc., twenty-five feet loog, »3 

per month 
Board, etc., for men, (16 per 

month 



"THE SEARCHLIGHT" 

Thos. B. Murphy 



Capt. Tom Merry 



Compiler of - 



Scientific Farrier. TABULATED PEDIGREES 

TROTTING, ROAD AND PLAIN SHOEINC. (Thoroughbred Horses Only) 



... 23 Golden Gate Avenue . . . 

Branch Shop— Keating'sTrainingStables, Pleas- 
anton, Cal All work guaranteed. 
Telephone Folsom 871. 



To Horse Owners. 



Millard F. Sanders has located at Pleasanton, 
where he will conduct a first class training stable 
Gentlemen having colts or horses they wish devel 
oped for sale or racing purposes can be accommo- 
dated. Correspondence solicited. 



Address 534 1-2 South Spring St. 

Lob Angeles, Cal. 

Refers to Hon. Wm. C. Whitney, New York : Hon. 
Perry Belmont, New Yotk; James R Keene Esq., 
New York: E. S. Gardner, Jr.. Sandersville, Tenn. ; 
Wm. Hendrle Esq.. Hamilton, Ont. 



For Sale. 



The chestnut horse PRIMROSE, roaled 1892, by 
imported St. Blaise, dam Wood Violet (dam of Sen- 
ator Blaud, Sweet Violet and Tulala), by Imp. Ill- 
Used. Will be sold reasonable or leased to a 
responsible party. Apply to 

DAN DENNISON, Ingleaide Track. 



January 6, 1900J 



15 



Palace Hotel 
Supper Room 



The moderate charges, de- 
lightful orchestral concerts 
and the undoubted luxury 
are the attributes that make 
the new Supper Room at the 
Palace Hotel the favorite 
place for after theatre parties. 
Open every evening (Sundays 
excepted) from 9:30 to 12 
o'clock. Entrance from main 
office and grand court, 

JOHN C. K1RKPATRICK, Manager. 

Books for Stallion Owners. 

1. Hoover' Stallion Service Records. 

The most complete book for recording stallion 
Btrvice ever placed before breeders. Not a pocket 
edition. No more disputing sires. No more mixing 
of dams where this book Is used. There is space for 
100 mares, giving their full breeaing, desc lption 
dales of service, dates of foa ing. with a page for 
tabulating pedigree ot stallion i'i use, etc., etc.. with 
i idex complete, size 10x7!4. Each book is hand- 
somely and substantially bound. Can te used for 
any kind ol pedigreed stock $2 00 

2. The Standard Stallion Service Book. 
The greatest Service Book published, containing 

space fur entering 100 mares, giving space for full 
description, pedigree, date of services and refusals, 
date of foaling, etc., with in'iex complete, neatly 
bound io leathereue. suitable for pocket use. Can 
tn used for any kind of pedigreed stock 81 0C 

3. Breeder's Note and Certificate Book. 
This book contains 75 blank certificates to be 

given to owners of mares, certifying that said mare 
has been bred to a certain stallion. Also 75 notes 
suitable for owner of mare giving to owner of stallion 
on account ot stallim service fee. This book is well 
bound, and has tt ibs for both the notes and cer- 
tificates. Can be used for any kind of pedigreed 
Btock 81 00 

4. Stock Farm Record Book. 

FOR EVERY HORSE OWNER. 

It is all its name implies. Contains space for en- 
tering full description and of every animal on the 
farm, etc. 100 pages. Every farm should have 
one 91 00 

5. The Horseman's Handbook. 
Contents— Care and management of stallions; 

care and management of broodmares; care, break- 
ing and developing of colts; care handling and 
management of campaigners; care of the feet; shoe- 
ing and booting; care of horses in sickness; rules of 
the American trotting turf; betting rules; rules for 
laying out track, etc.. etc 81 00 

ALL. 1TVE TO ONK ADDRESS FOR »5. 

Sent prepaid on receipt of price. Address: 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
San Francisco. Cal. 



SMITHS 

CASH STORE 

The orieinal reliable and largest mail order hou'e. 
Ask for Catalogue, free. 

25-27 Market St., near the Ferry. 

Mark Levy 

Fashionable Tailor 

For Quality, Style, Fit and Excellent work un 
surpassed. 

22 1-2 Geary St., San Francisco. 
Prices reasonable. Room 20. 




EA 




Business College, 24 Post St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The most popular school on the Coast. 
EC P. HEALD, President, O. S. HALEY, Sec'y. 
SWSend for Circulars. 



Breeders' Directory. 



HOI.8TKIIV8- Winners of every 7 days' butter con 
test at State Fair 1899 1st & 2nd foraged cows, 4-yr 
3-yr, and 2yr,-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams compe 
ling. 5ih year my Holstelns have beaten Jerse>8for 
butler Stock for sale; also pigs. F. H. Burke, 626 
Market St., 8. F. 



Once Used, Always Used. 



Y K It It A BUK»A JKRSKYS-The best A. J. C.C 
registered prize herd Is owned by HENRY PIERCE 
San Francisco. Animals for sale. 



JKRKKY8, HOL8TEIN8 AN" DUHHAM8. 

Dairy Stock specially. H< gs, Poultry. Established 
1876. William Nile* <& Co. , Los Angeles, Cal 



W. A. 8HIPPKK, Avon. Cal., Standard-bred Trot 
ting. Carriage and Hoad Horses, Jacks, Mules and 
Durham Bulls for Sale. 



VETERINARY. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and Stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



33 1- . W jm.. F*. HTSsara. 

M. R. O. V. 8., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON, 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary Bur 
geons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburg Veterinary 
Medical Society; Graduate of the New Veterinary 
College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Surgeon to the S. F. 
Fire Department; Live Block Inspector for New Zea- 
land aud Australian Colonies at the port ot SaD 
Francisco; Professor of Equine Medicine, Veterinary 
Surgery, Veterinary Department University of 
California; Ei President of the California State Vet- 
erinary Medical Association; Veterinary Infirmary, 
Residence and OfHce. San Francisco Veterinary Hos- 
pital ill' Golden Gate Avenue, near Webster St.. Ban 
Francisco: Telephone West 128. 




O'BRIEN & SONS, Agents, 

San Francisco, Cal, 



Sulkies Built to Order! 

REPAIRED and CONVERTED. 

Lined up to ran perfect when strapped to 
horse. 

OUE SPECIALTY 

^SULKIES TO RENT-^ 

We buy and sell Second hand Sulkies. 
W J. RENNET, Blkeman, 

581 Valencia St.. near 16tb 



The largest and best located sales pavilion 
on the Pacific Coast I 



Occidental Horse Exchange 

721 HOWARD STREET, 



Near Third 



San Francisco. 



Having fitted up the abotre place especially for 
the sale of harness horses, vehicles, harness, etc., it 
will afford me pleasure to correspond with owners 
regarding the Auction Sales which I shall hole 1 
at this place EVERY TUESDAY at 11 a. ra 
Arrangements can be made for special sales of 
standard bred trotting stock, thoroughbreds, etc. 
My turf library is the largest on this Coast, hence 
lam prepared to compile catalogues satisfactorily 
to my patrons. I take pleasure in referring to any 
and all for whom 1 have sold horses during the past 
two years. WM. G. LAYNG, 

Live Stock Auctioneer. 

Telephone Main 5179. 




A pleasant and healthy- 
exercise attended with 
occasional soreness of 
the muscles. 

ABSORBING, JR. 
will quickly restore them 

to a normal condition. 

Absorbine, Jr. 

is a pleasant liniment to use, cures any 
strain or bruise, removes any soft bunch, 
highly perfumed, nicely put up. $1.00 
per bottle of regular dealers or by mail. 
Manufactured by 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

SPRINGFIELD, - • MASS. 




(Trads Mark Registered.) 

The greatest remedy in the world for all diseases 
of the foot of the horse. Best for road horses; best 
for carriage horses; best for work horses. Cures bad 
feet, keeps good feet sound. Cheapest because it 
goes farthest and does all that is claimed of it 

It was used all the past summer by Tom Murphy, 
California's great track shoer on the Keating horses 
that won 828,000 on the Grand Circuit. If you see 
Murphy ask him about it. Or ask Dr. Boucher of 
Miss Logan fame; Monroe Salisbury, Chas. Durfee 
or Pete Williams. 

There are Scores of Letters Like] These: 

Sflma, Ala , Nov. 4, 1899. 
Harkold & Co.: Find check enclosed for which 
send me a Ducket of ointment. I will say that 
Harrold s has benefited the feet of my horses more 
than any other preparation I ever used. 

Roy Miller. 

That's What They All Say. 

HARROLD'S HOOF OINTMENT not only 
cures all diseases of the horse's foot, 
hut keeps good feet absolutely sound. 



PRICES— lty lb box, SI; 3 lb. bucket, »2; 
5 lb. bucket, S3 ; 10 1b. bucket, S5, F. O. 
E. Chicago. 

Manufactured solely by 

HARROLD & CO., 

1013 Masonic Temple - Chicago, III. 



Wiite for our book "The Foot of the Horse." Sent 
free if this paper is mentioned. 
Thompson Bosler, Los Angeles, agent for Southern 
California. 



CalifiFBia Norinwestern Ry, 

LESSEE OF 

San Francisco & North Pacific Ry. 
The Picturesque Route 

OP CALIFORNIA. 

T L Finest Fishing and Hunting In California 

NUMEROUS RESORTS. 

MINERAL SPRINGS, HOT AND COLD. 

HEALTH 

PLEASURE 

RECREATION 

The Section tor Fruit Farms and Stock 
Breeding. 

THE ROUTE TO 

San Rafael petaluma 

Santa Rosa, ukiah 

And other beaatlml towns. 
THE BEST CAMPING GROUNDS ON 
THE COAST. 

Ticket Omen — Corner New Montgomery »i 
Market streets, tinder Palace Hotel. 
General OrriOB — Mutual Life Building. 

B. X. BW AN. ».». P»'i. A«t 



W.& P. 



ROOFING PAINTS. 

Plastic Slate. 

An unequaled coating for roofs, tanks, and flumes 
Cheap. Durable. 

PACIFIC REFINING & R00FIN0 CO. 

113 New Montgomery St., S., F. 

Correspondence solicited. 



BLAKE, MOFFiTT & T0WNE 



DEALERS IN - 



65-67-59-61 First Street, S. P. 



Tklephon k Main 19 



Cocoanut Oil Cake. 

THE BEST FEED FOR STOCK, 
CHICKENS AND PIGS. 

For sale In lots to suit by 
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KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS. 



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OE THE 

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Commencing MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 1900. 



Members' Stake 

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N. H. HICKMAN, 
1767 Page St., San Francisco. 



AT STUD 

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AT STUD 

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No. 39,168, by BEN DIGO— MAUD 8. II. 
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PINE BILL, COCKER h BNNELS, 
San Anselmo, Marin Co., Cal. 



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16 



[January 6, 1900 



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BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

22-34 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



18 



[January 13.. 1900 



L GOING TO CHICAGO. 

Mllo Knox Has a Carload Nearly Ready for 
the Splan-Newarass Sale. 



Over at the J. M. Nelson's stables at the Alameda track 
Milo Knox, the well known horseman of Haywards, is 
getting a carload of horses in shape for a trip across the 
mountains to Chicago, wherj they will be sold at the great 
sale which SplaL-Newgasa will hold at the big new pavilion 
at the Union 8tock Yards, from January 29lh to February 
3d. This sale is attracting great attention in the East from 
the fact that some of the fastest horses in America are to be 
offered, including Manager 2:06}, W. W. P. 2:05J, Roberts 
2:09£, Kiltie R. 2:08} and many others. 

Mr. Knox's consignment will consist of about sixteen head, 
and it will be a carload of choice animals. 

De Bernardi Basler, a standard and registered pacer with 
a record of 2:16}, is one of the fast ones that will be in the 
car. This gelding is six years old, sound and as fast as ever 
in his life. Be can show a very fast clip at any time an i 
can certainly reduce bis record whenever started against it. 
He is by Robert Basler and his dam, Peerless Maid, by 
Strathway. 

Billy McKinley 2:25, that has been driven some with De 
Bernardi Basler, will also go to the sale. He got his record 
this year on a track that was at least six seconds slow, and it 
is no measure of his speed. He is a free driver, a sound 
horse and can show two minute speed on the track. He is 
by Yosemite 4906, out of the dam of Phenol 211}. 

A mare that will make a fine carriage animal ii Flora 8. 
by Exmore, dam Flora, by Bell Alta, second dam Djlly by 
Morgan Messenger. She is a large mare 1 6.2 in height, with 
plenty of lubstance and style and is very handsome. 

Guy Nelson is the name of a four year old stallion bred by 
the late Mr. Corbitt that his the miking of a very fast trotter 
and as be is a good looking colt and shows excellent action 
and speed, he should be one of the highest priced one in the 
lot. He is by Guv Wilkes out of Glen Ellen by Arthurton, 
second dam SmoothbrUr by Eugene Casserly (son of Gen. 
Taylor), third dam Peanuts by Geo. M. Patchen Jr , fourth 
dam old Peanuts by Morse Horse 6. This colt has never 
been trained as hie owner did not intend working him until 
this year and racing him in his five year old form. With a 
few "6crape outs" he showed a quarter in 32J seconds, the 
last eighth in 16 seconds. He is an elegant trotter, not 
afraid of steam cars or anything else, goes in open bridle, 
wears no boots or weights, for in fact he has never been shod, 
being perfectly balanced without shoes. Any lady or child 
can drive him and is alsolutely son-..; in every way. Hig 
owner says "I am su-e u« can trot in 2:15 or better next year 
should h c ' oe trained." He is a good prospect to enter in 
the Hig stakes. 

For a brushy road horse the brown gelding Frank L. is 
one that can show the way to the majority on any speed 
way. He is 15 3 in height, a good looking stylish horse and 
has no record. He has been used as a road horse and has 
pulled a high wheeled cart a half mile in 1:07 A , the last 
quarter in 32 seconds. He can take a record of 2:12 or 
better if trained. 

Another horse that will make a grand roadster is George 
H., a son of Dexterwood a son of Dexter Prince. The dam 
of George H. is by Gen. Benton, and his stcond dam Addie 
Lee by Black Hawk. He is just broken but is one of the 
nicest drivers ever bitched to a cart, and is prompt, quick 
and fast. 

As fine a looker as we have seen for many a day is Oleo, a 
bay gelding, sound as a dollar, and has never started or been 
entered in a race. He was sired by Anteeo Jr., his dam 
being a mare by General McClellan. Oleo hasspsed enough 
to go to the races and with but little work stepped three 
heats in 2:19 A, 2:19 and 2:19. He has trotted a quarter in 
32 A seconds. 

One of the stars of the lot is Emma Abbott 2:17} by 
Abbottsford, out of Julia by Rustic. This mare is as hand- 
some a trotter as there is in California and can step in 2:10 
Bure. She is a good sized black mare that has proven her- 
self game in hard fought races, and her record was made in 
a winning race. She is as sound as a new coined dollar, is a 
good driver, and in good hands ought to be a good money 
winner in her class this year. 

There are quite a number besides those above mentioned 
that Mr. Knox will take to Chicago, and he will probably 
start from Alameda with them about the 25th of this month. 
He will take with him in the car the handsome black mare 
Mia Louise 2:15 J by Steinway, the property of Mr. John 
Staley of Diwson, who is shipping her to his home in Ohio. 
Mr. 8taley purchased this mare last year from L. E. Clawson 
and bred her to McKinney. 



A kandsome album memorial to the late Robert Bonner 
was presented tu the Bonner family bv the National Associa- 
tion of News Dealers, Book- Sellers and Stationers, at the 
(dice of the New York Ledger. The frontispiece of the 
memorial is a painting of Mr Bonner. One of the pages 
contains this resolution: ''Resolved, that we, the National 
Association of News Dealers, Book Sellers and Stationers of 
the United States, in convention assembled at Buffilo, on 
this, the 22d day of August, 1899, do express our profound 
regret at this irretrievable loss, and beg leave to mingle our 

orrow with that of his family, in whose affliction we deeply 

hare." 



What to Do With a Stallion. 

The men who have stallions will locate them, and if they 
expect to do much with them will commence advertising 
them. These gentlemen have now fully learned the salutary 
lesson that it does not answer the purpose to keep their lights 
under bushels. They now have experience enough to know 
that however great the stallion it is necessary to let the 
world know that they are in the business, and that of two 
horses anything like equal, the one advertised and the other 
not, the one that is well advertised will distance his com- 
petitor. 

Don't be afraid that your horse will he too well known. 
Thai's a thing that never occurred yet with a good horse. 
If he's worthless the less said about him the better, and unless 
he is well advertised nine people out of ten will conclude 
that he is worthless, and if his owners do not think enough 
of him to advertise him he generally is. 

George Wilkes was not advertised extensively as a stock 
horse till he v. as 17 or 18 years of age, and his career as a 
stallion dates from that time. The merits of Electioneer as 
a stallion were unknown till he was about 14 or 15. Either 
of these horses might have made his owner a fortune long 
before that time. And so it is with many horses, if thor- 
oughly advertised and opportunities given them early in life 
they will make great horses; otherwise not. If your horse 
is worth keeping as a stallion at all, he is worth the best op. 
portuoity that can be provided. If not, make a gelding of 
him and be done with it. Sometimes an advertisement doe 8 
not appear to pay. Your horse may be slow in making a 
start, but when a horse that his been well advertised doe.j 
begin to make a start he comes with a rush. If you have 
confidence in him, by all means advert se him and give ether 
people the same confidence They won't have it until yon 
do. People generally think that an owner has very little re- 
spect for bis stallion if he won't advertise him, and people 
are generally right about it, too 

If a horse is really good a liberal supply of printer's ink 
will build him up faster than anything else in the world. 
Maybe you think I am talking for effect, but if you are in- 
clined to be doubiful about it, just think a little and tell me 
what trotting stallion ever became a great horse without 
liberal advertisement There may be a very few such that 
reached great success when about too old to be of much more 
service. But this is not what owners want nowadays. They 
want their reputations made while they are young enough to 
do their owners some good. 

Who wants a horse that has the true elements of greatness 
in him to pass tbe days of bis youth and vigor in obscurity, 
and then to flame up like a dying candle just at the end of 
bis career. When people begin to know what he is he's 
gone, and they say: "What a wonderful horse he was, and 
what a pity he did not have better opportunities when be 
was young." This has been the fate of many a great horse | 
and all on account of rn unenterprising owner. Of such a 
horse it may often be written, "A victim of wasted oppor. 
tunities." — Iconoclast. 



The Fortieth Agricultural District. 

The Fortieth Agricultural District, comprising Yolo 
county, has made its first annual report since the district was 
created in 1899. The Board of Directors is composed of 
C. R. Hoppin, John Reith, Jr., C. F. Burns, F. H. Owem 
8 M. Montgomery, A. O, Stevens, W. 8. Allen and A. M. 
Britt, all well known citizens of Yolo county, who elected as 
Secretary Mr. C. F. Thomas, who has recently compiled the 
following report and submitted the same to the State Agri- 
cultural Society according to the law requiring tbe same. 
Mz. Thomas has made [quite an exhaustive report on the re- 
sources of the district. Under the head of " The Stock In- 
dustry," the report says: 

"Stock raising is another leading industry of the county. 
Horse dealers in -earch of either driving or draft horses in- 
variably turn their eyes towaid Yolo. Some of the most 
noted animals that have appeared upon the turf are Yolo 
county products, and San Francisco has always been a liberal 
buyer of our draft horses. The progeny of Lily Wright and 
Alexander Button have given the county a national reputa- 
tion, and Kelly Brigs^s, tbe phenomenal pacer and a Yolo 
horse, is regarded as the coming race horse of the State. 
It is probable that Yolo county bas furnished more horses 
for Honolulu and foreign trade during the last year than any 
other county in the Slate. Yolo county mules have also 
been shipped to Honolulu, Australia and the Fiji Islands in 
large numbers during the last year. The traffic in mules 
and horses has resulted in a tremendous volume of trade for 
Yolo county farmers and given an impetus to the stock in- 
dustry, the beneficial effects of which will be felt for many 
years to come. 

"For many years the cattle industry languished in this 
section of the State, but the revival of tbe dairy interests 
which followed the establishment of the creameries has also 
given encouragement to farmers who take a great pride in 
breeding fine cattle During the last two years dairymen 
have not only picked tbe cream of Yolo county herds, but 
they have endeavored to improve local strains bv making 
purchases of the pick from the best herds in toe State. As 
a result the number and value of Yolo county herds is in- 
creasing at a fast rate and it is confidently predicted that 
when the first annual fair is held tbe d'slrict will be able to 
makeone of the finest local exhibits of cattle ever witnessed 
i n California " 



Gen. B. F. Tracy has sold the chestnut filly Adorica, by 
Advertiser, dam Corsica, by Dexter Prince, to James W. 
Cooke, of Philadelphia. This elegantly bred young trotter 
will probably be developed by Frank Turner. 



HORSE NEWS FROM LOS ANGELES. 



A Road Pair Trot in 2:38 and Ohange Hands 
for $1200. 



Our friend Geo. T. Beckers, of Los Angeles, the owner of 
Zombro 2:11, has developed into a first class newspaper cor- 
respondent. Mr. Beckers has been sending tbe editor of 
this paper a batch of news from the City of Angels quite 
often lately and has demonstrated that he knows a real news 
itejo when he finds it, and his communications have been 
full of interest to our readers. Under date of January 8th, 
Mr. Beckers writes us as follows: 

Mb Editor: — That the horse business is flourishing down 
here you will see by tbe following items which I have picked 
up since my last: 

Mrs. L J. Hastings of this city disposed of a half dozen 
well bred ones by huction at the race track here, January 
6th, with the following result : 

Gray mare by Monroe Chief, dam by A. W. Richmond | 
$52; Princess Wilkes, black mare by Ned Wilkes, $100; 
Vashti, five year old mare by Vasto, $150; Idirect, mare by 
Director, $90; Velvet Rose, four years old by McKinney 
2:11 J, dam Etta Wilkes 2:19}, $350; .Geannette Rose, five 
years old by McKioney 2:11}, dim Etta Wilkes 2:19}, $600. 

Velvet Rose was bid in by W. G. Durfee for a prominent 
oil man here, and he also wanted Geannette Rose, but Mr. 
C. Christie, of Kansas City, the owner of Bob Riley 2:10, bid 
$600. and as that was Mr. Durfee'9 limit, the mare went to 
the Kansas City "tan and will be taken East with a number 
of others purchased by bim in different parts of California. 
Princess Wilkes and the Director mare were bought by Mr, 
Slice aud M M. Potter was tbe buyer of Vashtie. 

John Llewellyn, of Los Angeles, who owned Sir Gird 
(2:26}, by Woolsey ) and mate, a pair of bays, remarked to 
Mr. McKewen the other day that his team could show 8 
m le in 2:40 and he wanted $1200 for tbem. The track was 
vary slow on account of rain the day before. Mr. McKewen 
Slid if thee could step a mile in 2:40 he would give the 
s im asked. Walter Maben Locked them up and after a little 
warming exercise drove tbem the mile handily in 2:38 and 
the money wbb paid over right on the epct. Everybody who 
saw them said they could have marched in 2:30 had the 
track been in good order. So you see the horse business is 
good down here at present. 

I am only going to breed Z imbro 2:11 to twenty choice 
mares at $50 each this season, and his book is full now, in- 
cluding tbe best mares in Southern California. He has been 
worked miles in 2:33 and quarters in 34 seconds so far. I 
will not go faster than that with him for two months yet, but 
will then begin giving bim some sharp work. 

Mr. Gaines, the trainer, has arrived here from Santa Ana 
with a string of horses belonging to Nick Corvarubias, and 
will have a stable of trotters and pacers on the circuit again 
this year. 

Tbe Los Angeles Gentlemen's Driving Club had a nice lot 
of matinee racing Christmas Day with a free gate, and will 
have some more on the 20. h inst. 

Irene Crocker 2:17 by Will Crocker is one of the fioest 
matinee horses in Los Angeles and is a grand road mare as 
she has fine style and lots of speed. 

Geo. T. Beckehs. 

Santa Ana Will Hold a Fair. 

The 32d District Agricultural Association, whose track a ' 
Santa Ana has the reputation of being one of the very best 
and fastest mile tracks in California will give a fair and race 
meeting this fall, probably just before or just after the Los 
Angeles fair. 

The Directors of the 32d District will meet at Santa Ana 
on the 22d instant to take the first steps taward holding this 
fair, and from the'present outlook they will make it one of 
the best ever held in tbe southern country. The agricul- 
tural exposition will be made as complete as possible, and 
harness racing will make up the greater part of tbe speed 
program. 

In days when Silkwood 2:07 was in his racirg prime, it 
only needed the announcement that he would appear at tbe 
Santa Ana track to draw an immense crowd to see him go. 
During the past few years, however, there has not been so 
much interest taken in the harness horses in that section, but 
now that good prices are again to be had for trotters and 
pacers with speed there is a general revival of interest and 
the fair of 1900 is already being talked about. 

At the Santa Ana track several horses are already at work, 
Mr. Geo. W. Ford having the champion four year old mare 
of 1899, Neeretta 2:11}, and a half dc zen green ones by his 
great ycung stallion Neernut, there in charge of John Brooks, 
the well known trainer. Mr. Judd has the old hero Klamath 
2:07$ there locking and doing well, and there are several 
others to be placed in training before the first of February. 

Toe 32d District Association has done wisely in setting an 
early dale for a meeMog of i's Directors, and will no doubt 
make an early announcement of its speed program and 
thereby attract a good list of entries. 

Minnie Patchen, dam of Island Wilkes, Abbott Wilkes, 
Red Pointer and Senator Blackburn, all in the ?:20 list, is 
the dam also of Ebba that is touted for the M. and M. for 
1900. Ebba is a sister to Island Wilkes and has shown 2:13. 



January 13, 1900] 



19 



Ringbone, Its Cure and Treatment. 



Io some features allied to splint, ringbone occurs on the 
pietero bone and is not limited to those of the fore limbs, 
though it is most frequent on them, occurring less frequ.-ntly 
on these bones in the bind extremeties, writes a prominent 
veterinarian in the London Live Slock Journal. It consists 
essentially in the presence of e nlargements on the large or 
small pastern bones; these deposits being more or lees oumer- 
ous and extending round the bones, whence, in all prob- 
ability, the name of riogbone. They may be quite close to 
Ihs pistera j )ints, or they may be on the middle of the bones 
— io front, at tha sides, or behind. They are usually quite 
evident to the eye, but more bo to the practiced touch. When 
they exist in front of the pastern, thev are best seen from 
eide of the horse; but when at the sides cf the bones, then the 
eye perceives them more readily when the limb is looked at 
from the front. Passing the hand over them they feel under 
the skin as prominence' 1 , more or less irregular io shape and 
sizs, and not symmetrical, if they are present on two or more 
pasterns. This should be remembared as the inexperienced 
are liable to mistake the natural prominences on the sides o' 
these bones and which serve for the attachment of ligaments 
when more than usually developed; instead of being 
obj actionable, these normal prominences are an advantage, 
and they are always symmetrical. So that io examining the 
pasterns for ringbone, these should always be compared with 
each other. Of course when the ringbone is situited at the 
bick psrt of the bones as these are covered by ligaments 
and tendons, it is hidden from the eye, and not easily reached 
by the fingers. 

As has been said, ringbone may be situated on the large 
pastern bone wheie it is generally easily delected; it is then 
called high riogbone, or it is on the small pastern bone 
toward the hoof, when it is known as low or coronet ring- 
bone. The latter is more frequent than the former. The 
enlargement of lingbone is, of course, very hard, but when 
it is not produced by external injury, the skin covering it is 
not thickened or scarred, and is freely movable over it. 

Ringbone is, in nearly every case, a serious condition, be" 
cause io the great majority cf horses iffected with it there is 
more or less lameness, which is irremovable unless the lower 
part of the limb is rendered ineersitive bv dividing the nerves 
supplying it with secsaticn. Owirg to (be bony deposits in- 
terfering with the movements cf the joints when they are 
situated around them, or to the pressure tbey make on the 
ligaments or tendons which are spread in white bands over 
them, a cure could only be effected by their removal, and of 
course this is impossible. The same anatomical arrangement 
also explains the great pain the animal gives evidences of 
while ringbone is forming, and after it is fully developed. 
It must be acknowledged, however, that cases are seen now 
and then in which lameness is only slight or is altogether 
absent, but then the ringbone has been produced by external 
injury, or has been very slowly developed. 

The causes of ringbone are various. In Borne animals, or 
breeds of animals, there appears to be a natural predisposi- 
tion to it, this predisposition being generally related to de- 
fective pastern joints or deformed limbs. Strain on the 
ligaments connected with the pastern bones, and concussion 
from being worked on hard roads, when the horses are still 
immature, have, no doubt, much to do with its production. 
Therefore it is that it is most frequently found in riding 
horses which have been much traveled on roads at a fast 
pace while young. But it is nevertheless, sometimes seen 
affecting the pasterns of horses, which have only been mod- 
erately worked, and not alwavs on hard ground, and such 
cases might be ascribed to hereditary predisposition. Bad 
shoeing, in which the hoofs are not properly levelled, or the 
shoe is left thicker on one side than on the otber, may also 
induce the formation of ringbone. It is perhaps oftenes( 
seen in horses, with either very long, sloping pasterns, in 
which the riogbone is generally at the sides, or in short, 
upright pasterns, in which the deposit is most frequently 
observed in froot. The toes are also turned out or in in 
those horses which have a tendency to ringbone. 

The lameness may be very considerable, even with a small 
ringbone, and not so much with a more voluminous one, this 
depending greatly upon its situation. When it is forming 
there is much heat at the part and pain on pressure made by 
the finger, as well as in bending the pastern joints. The 
horse steps short in trotting on hard ground, and especially 
in turning, and is inclined to go on his toes. He always 
travels worst when ridden. 

The prevention of ringbone is evident. Animals which 
have a predisposition to it, either from a constitutional tend- 
ency to throw out bony deposits about the pasterns, or have 
defectively formed limbs which may favor its production 
from unequal bearing on the bones and joints, should not be 
bred from. Immatare animals should not be subjected to 
undue strain on their limbs, particularly on hard ground, 
and care ought to be taken to keep the hoofs level and in 
good direction whether shod or unshod. 

Ae for treatment, this will necessitate the intervention of 
the veterinary surgeon, whose skill will also have to be in- 
voked to diagnose the existence of ringbone in most cases. 
It is all-important to regulate the distribution of weight on 
the pastern bones and joints by attention to the hoofs and 
shoes. When ringbone is forming, absolute rest should be 
given as far it is possible to do so, for a considerable time 



aud (he floor of the stall or box should be laid with some soft 
material. Refrigerating lotions must be applied to reduce 
the icflimmation, and may soon be succeeded by blisters, the 
best being biniodide of mercury, which can be repeated at 
intervals. The actual cautery (firing) is sometimes resorted 
to, deep punctures being preferred to lines, and sometimes 
this is beneficial. 

In caseB in which all this treatment has failed division of 
the sensory nerve that supplies the pastern with sensation 
has rendered the animal free from pain, and consequently 
from lameness if the j)ints are not involved, but this opera- 
tion is not without certain dangers subsequently. 

In chronic cases of ringbone much benefit may be derived 
from the careful attention to the shoeing, as already indi- 
cated; and I have noticed a remarkable diminution in lame, 
ness follow the insertion of india rubber plates between the 
shoe and the hoof. 

In all cases if ringbone, as bas been already mentioned, 
important service can be tendered by '.he skillful shoer, who 
in maintaining the proper dimensions of the hoof and secur- 
ing a just distribution of the weight on the bones by attend- 
ing to their direction, cao enable an otherwise all but useless 
animal to continue work satisfactorily for perhaps years. 



Pacific Breeders Futurity. 



Three New Stallions for America. 



Gen. 8tephen Sanford, proprietor cf the Hurrican 8tud at 
Amsterdam, New York, has jubt purchased in Eogland three 
stallions to place on that well known breeding farm, and he 
has certainly got something extra good as far as blood lines 
are concerned. They were to have arrived in New York 
this week. The stallions are Royal Emblem, Orammont 
and Gonsalvo. Mr. Rowe says in regard to these hcrses : 

Royal Emblem was foeled in 1896, and is by Royal Hamp- 
ton out of Thistle. This pedigree is doubly interesting to 
Americans. Royal Hampton is the splendid son of Hamp- 
ton, which imp. Princess produced before her exportation 
from England for this country, where she earned imperish- 
able renown as the dam of Hi'i Highness, Prince Royal and 
Her Highness. 

Thistle, Royal Emblem's dam, produced Common and 
Throstle, both classic winners, while her son, imp. Gold- 
finch, is now at the stud at Raocho del Paso in California 
Goldfinch was a splendid raceturse, and, from the looks of 
some of his two year olds which I saw at Mr. C Littlefield's 
Jr.'n, last week, is likely to play an important part in our 
big j tveuile events this year. 

Royal Emblem was bred by Lord Ali,ngton, and was trained 
by John Porter, upon whose advice the purchase was made 
for Hurricana. He was reserved for the £10.000 Jockey 
Club Stakes last July, for which he ran second to his cham- 
pion stable companion, Flying Fox, but defeated Ninus Boni- 
face, Birkenhead, Dieudonne, Greenan, Mosa and My Boy. 
The hard ground of the summer told against Royal Emblem 
in his other race, the Liogfield Park Stakes, for which he 
went to the post an odds-oj favorite over such horses as 
Harrow and Sibola, possessing the full confidence of' his 
stable. 

Gonsalvo is a son of Fernandtz (brother to Isonomy) and 
Cherie she by Stockwell out of Chere Amie, she by Sweet- 
meat out of Amazon, by Touchstone. He waa third to 
Memoir and Blue Green ia the St. Leger of 1890, beating 
Martagoo, Sanfoin, Heaume, Surefoot, St. 8erf, Alloway 
and Queen's Birthday. His most noteworthy victories were 
the Alexander Plate at Ascot and the Goodwood Cup in 
1891, successes which surely proved him to be a genuine 
stayer. 

Grammont is a 12-year-old soo of St. Simon, which is in 
itself very impressive when one considers the wonderful suc- 
cess of St. Simon horses in Australia, to say nothing of their 
creditable aggregation of wianers here. Grammont's dami 
Margarita, is by The Duke (son of Stockwell) out of Tas- 
mania, by Melbourne. 

He won good races, io one of them beating Orion, and ha g 
had a number of winners in England, despite very unfavor. 
able =tud opportunities. 



Knee Sprung Horses. 



Among the few prominent stakes to be contested for thi 
year in California by the light harness horse?, is the Pacifi 
Breeders Futurity, given by the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders Association, the two year old divisions of which 
were trotted and paced last year at the Santa Rosa meeting of 
this organization, being won by Eula Mac 2:27* and N. L. 
B. 2:21} respectively. 

Fourth payment was due in the three year old divisions of 
the stake January 1st, aid as will ba seen by the following 
list payment has been made on 34 colts and fillies, and as 
this is the last payment except the starliog fee which is due 
ten days before the race, the outlook for good fields in both 
trotting and pacing divisions is excellent. The original 
stake was $3000, of which $750 went to the trolters and $500 
to the pacers as two year olds in 1899 The balance of the 
stake is divided $1000 to the trotters and $750 to the pacers 
and will be contested for this year at the Breeders meeting. 
Those on which fourth payment was made January let are 
as follows : 

Y Bollinger's b s Booiile Boy, by Boodle, dam by Wapsle. 

1 L Borden's ch c N L B, by Diablo— Alice Bell, dam by Washington. 
T W Barstow's b f Our Lady, by Wilkes Direct -Nettle O, by Anteeo. 

J D Carr's b f Baby Wilkes, by Paehec > Wilkes -Nina B, by Klectloneer 
J P Dunne's br 1 by McKlnney - r ontanlta. by Antevolo. 
H F Frank's b c Ben Llebes. by McKlnney— Belle McGrejor, by Ilober 
McGregor. 

C A Durfee'8 blk c by McKlnney-Nona Y, by Admiral. 

T J Drals' blk c Ouy Mc 1 1nney, by McKlnney, dam by <luy Wilkes. 

Dennis Uannou's ch c by Orover C ay— Miss SI lney, by Sidney 

H W Meek's br 1 by Welcome— Carmen, by Stelnway; br f by Mc- 
Klnney— Cricket; b f by Wm Harold-Flnela, by Fallls; b f by Wm 
Harol — Klenor, by Elector. 

A O Ournett's s c by McKlnney— Nellie Fairmont, by Fairmont. 

K P Heald's b c Tom Smlih, by McK Inney— Daisy S, by McDonald 
Chief. 

C Z Heberl's br 6 by McKinney— Dolly, by Mozart. 

H S Hugoboom'a b c by Diablo— Remember Me, by Waldst In. 

Park HenshaA's b I Lieta C, by McKlnney-Besite by Blackbird: c 

Oen. Forrest, by McKinnpy— O'phan (lirl by Blackbird. 
J B Iverson's br f Dagmar, by McKlnney Stelnway Maid, by Stelnway; 

b f Princess, by Eugeneer— Belle, by Kentucky Prli ce. 
J C Kirkpatrlck's f Lynna by Teheran— Edna W, by Lynwood. 
D E Knight's b f Eulah Mac, by McKinney— Balance All, by Brigadier; 

brc Waldsteia Jr, ;byi Walsteln — Lou Star, by Brigadier; bf Freda 

S, by Lynmont— Elm irlne, bv Elmore. 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm's b f Clairet, by Chas Derby— Ally Slnper' 

by Richard's Elector. 
C A Owen's b c Dakan D, by Aihadon-Z»da McQregor, by Robert 

McGregor. 

Palo Alto Stock Farm's b c Monbells, by Monaco— Beautiful B >lls,by 
The Moor. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's blk f by McKinney— By By, by Nutwood; b f 
Vollta, by Beau Brummel— Carlotta Wilkes, by Charlie Wilkes; b f 
by Russell Pansy, by Clay. 

Geo. E. Shaw's b f Aunt Sallle, by Benton Boy— Nellie Nutwood, by 
Brown Jug. 

Tuttle Bros' b f Rosalind, by Statu B— Klickitat Maid, by Altamont. 
Vendome Stock Farm's b c Vendome, by Iran Alto— Linda Oak, by Guy 
Wilkes. 

B D Murphy's Edem Pasha, by Boodle— Pegasus, by Gaviota. 



Answers to Correspondents. 

B. & T. Wisdom, Montana — 8trathrol is a bay horse foaled 
1891, bred at McGrathiana Farm, Kentucky. He is by 
Strathmore, dam Petroleuse II., by Petrarch. Decapod is a 
bay horse, foaled 1890, by imp. Sir Modred, dam Christine 
by imp. Australian. We can find no record of the pedigree 
of Gray Fin. 

Zephaniah Bibdsall, or Captain Birdsall, as he was 
better known to the horse breeders of California, died at his 
home on Pine street in this city last week. For fifty years 
he had been io the employ of Wells, Fargo & Co., and pur- 
chased the majority of the horses used by that express com- 
pany in California Capt. Birdsall was an excellent judge of 
a horse, and though over ninety years of age was active in 
business up to a few weeks before his demise. 



A well knovn veterinary surgeon who has had wide ex- 
perience says : 

There is no other trouble so deceiving to the horsemen in 
general, as well as nearly all the professors, as a knee-sprung 
horse. I have n^ver yet found a man who was treating a 
knee-sprung horse that did not confine the treatment almost 
entirely to the tendons, and, therefore failure wan the res lit, 
as very few if any horses under such treatment have been 
cured, and the trouble has become known as incurable. 

I am positive the entire trouble originates in the feet, and 
any swelling, soreness or contraction found in the tendons 
comes directly from the inflammation and irritation con- 
tained in the inner or sensitive frog quarters and heel of the 
foot, and while causes for this trouble in the feet are many ) 
it matters not so long as the real cause is perfectly under- 
stood and the treatment scientifically performed. 

Ninety-five of the knee-sprung horses can be permanently 
cured in a short space of time (old broken-down horses ex- 
cepted) aud the cure will ba permanent, so long as proper 
care is taken of the feet and shoeing. 



tiorso Owners Sliould Us© 
GOMBATJLT'S 

Caustic 
Balsam 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy. 

A SAFE, SPEEDY AND 
POSITIVE CURE. 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OF FIRING 

Impossible io produce any scar or blemish. The 
8afe/8t best Blister ovor used. Tikes the place 
or all linimonts for mild or aovero net on. Removes 
all Bunches or Blemishos from Horses or Cattle. 

As a HUMAN REMEDY for Rheumatls n. 
Sprains, Soro Throat, Eto., it La invaluable. 
ufC PIIIDIIITCC that ono ti blesponnfnl of 
lit UUAnANItt CAUST ' BALSAM will 
produce more nctunl results than whole bottle of 
any liniment or Hpuvin cure niixtu evor made. 

Evorybottlo of Cau8tic Ba'nam sold is Wnti an- 
ted to cive satisfaction. Trice .50 per bottle. Hold 
by druqgists. or sent by expres charges paid, with full 
directions for ity_use. Bend lor defc^iptivo circ ilars. 
testimonials, etc^/Address "X 
TIIK LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS CO. ..Invelanrt. Ohio 



20 



[January 13, 1900 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F W. KELLEY, PR0PMMOB. 
-J* 

The Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 



— OFFICE — 

22 1=2 GEARY STREET, San Francisco. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 

C. E. Goodrich, Special Representative, 34 Park Row, New York. 



Terms— One Tear S3, Six Months «1.75, Three Months 91. 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. vV. Kelley. 22% Geary 3t. San Fiancisco, Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writers name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee of 
good faith. 

San Franoieoo, Saturday, January 13, 1900. 



THE OCCIDENT STAKE of 1902, entries to 
which closed with Secretary Peter J. Shields of the Cali- 
fornia State Agricultural Society January 1st, this year, 
has an unprecedented number of entries. There are 
ninety-four entrips, which number has never been 
equalled during the twenty years since the stake was in- 
augurated. There is plenty of evidence in this to prove 
that there is life in the trotting horse industry — more 
life than has been evidenced for some time in California. 
Allowing for the usual failures to make future payments 
the Occident Stake of 1902 will be worth at least 14000, 
a sum worth contesting for, and one that will give addi- 
tional value to every colt or filly named for it. Sixty 
per cent of the stake will go to the winner or very nearly 
$2500, the second horse will receive in the neighborhood 
of $1200, and the third horse $400, or four times the 
amount of fu!ly paid up entrance money. The winner 
in addition gets the Occident Cup, valued at $400. It 
is plainly to be seen that the Occident Stake of 1902 will 
be one of the richest ever contested for by harness horses 
this side the Rocky Mountains. Second payment has 
been made on 4G entries in the Occident Stake for 1901, 
and third payment on 22 tntries for the stake of 1900 to 
be trotted at the State Fair this year. This should re- 
sult in the largest field that has evei started in the race, 
as it is proof that there are twenty-two colts and fillies 
whose owners intend to place them in training for the 
event. There is but one more payment to make in 
this years stake, and it is due thirty days before the 
race. In the Stanford Stake for 1900 and 1901 there 
is also a splendid showing. There are fourteen paid 
up entries in the stake for this year, and for 
the stake of 1901, forty-four made second payment 
out of au original entry of fifty The breeder* 
and owners of trotting bred horses in California have 
shown by their payments in these stakes and also by the 
splendid list of third payments in the Pacific Breeders 
Futurity that they have again taken heart and renewed 
their confidence in the future of the industry. The 
revival in interest, the jump in prices for good ones, the 
demand for high class roadsters and track horses that 
cannot be supplied, the evident prosperity of the whole 
industry are matters for congratulation wherever horse- 
men meet. There is a lesson in the situation that should 
be studied and understood by every person connected in 
any way with the business. It is that there will never 
be an over production of good horses, but that in the 
future as in the past a panic can be caused by attempt- 
ing to foist upon the public animals that have no quali- 
fications for the purposes for which they were bred. The 
year 1900 opens brightly, and there is prosperity in 
sight for all engaged in horse breeding who use good 
judgment and plain common sense, and who realize the 
fact that something cannot be bred from nothing. 



- ROAD AND DRAFT HORSES that are all ready 
for use, are in demand in San Francisco, and the well 
known auctioneers, Chase <k Mendenhall, successors to 
Killip & Co., will have a sale of horses of this descrip- 
tion at the walesyard, corner Van Ness avenue and 
Market street, on Tuesday next. The trotting bred 
horses are a rare good lot, and buyers will not only be 
able to get some fine roadsters among them, but there 
are several racing prospects that only need training to 
get fast records. These horses are by such sires as 



Silver Bow 2:16, Pleasanton 2.-29J, Easter Wilkes, a son 
of Guy Wilkes and a Nutwood mare, and other well 
bred stallions. They are all thorjughly broken and no 
better looking lot has been put up at auction in this city 
for a loDg time. The draft horses comprise 25 head of 
well broken animals, among them a magnificent pair of 
blacks weighing 2800, a handsome pair of greys that 
will tip the scales at 2900, and a grey team which weighs 
3000 pounds. There are a number of excellent driving 
and express horses to be sold at the same time. Don't 
let the date slip your mind. The sale will begin next 
Tuesday morning, January 16th, at 11 o'clock sharp, 
Be on hand if you want a good horse at your own price. 



CHRIS PETERteON 2:13J is the subject of our title 
page picture this week and the likeness is ODe of the 
best. It was taken by J. R. Hodson, the Geary street 
photographer, who is one of the few who understand 
horse portraiture. Chris Peterson is one of the famous 
road horses of San Francisco. He is a bay gelding 
foaled in 1889, and was bred by Marcus Daly in Mon- 
tana. He is by Deputy 11,779, out of Virginia Wilkes 
by Denvtr Wilkes, second dam Lady Cassell by Shelby 
Chief. His record was made at Butte in 1897. There 
is not a trotter in San Francisco that can outbrush him, 
and could he stand training for races, would certainly be 
able to reduce his mark to 2.10 or better. His speed 
was such that T. E. Keating intended taking bim East 
last year, but it was feared his legs would not stand the 
hard work necessary to win on the grand circuit. Mr. 
H. Dutard, the well known Davis street merchant, owns 
this grand roadster, and the horse has for two years pas', 
been in the bands of the well known trainer Geo. W. 
Berry, who keeps him in the pink of condition all the 
time. Chris Peterson was driven to his record by the 
late Lee Shaner. 



S. H. HOY, of Winters, owner of the stallion Bays, 
water Wilkes, sire of Kelly Briggs 2:10J, publishes in 
this issue the announcement that his horse will make 
the season of 1900 at Winters, Yob county, at $40. 
Mr. Hoy's letter arrived too late for us to prepaie for 
this issue the customary notice containing tabulated 
pedigree, etc., but it will appear next week. Bayswater 
Wilkes is a wonderfully well bred stallion, and his first 
and second dams are not only strictly thoroughbred but 
both are producers of speed at the trot, the first dam 
having produced Senator L. 2:234, holder at one time of 
the four mile record, and his second dam being the dam 
of Bessie Thome 2:22$. The thoroughbred blood in 
Bayswater Wilkes is the sort that has won at four miies, 
at both the running and the harness gaits, while from 
his sire, Sable Wilkes, he gets the best of the Wilkes 
family combined with that of The Moor and Mambrino 
Pilot. Mr. Hoy has one of the most promising young 
horses in California and that he will be one of ou r 
leading sires is certain if he is mated with an average 
lot of mares. 

NAGLEE BURKE'S HORSES in training, together 
with a number of his two year olds, will be sold at 
auction at the Oakland Race Track on Thursday, Janu. 
ary 25th, at 11:15 o'clock sharp, by the well known 
auctioneer, Wm. G. Layng. Mr. Burke intends to retire 
from racing altogether, and engage in brteding for the 
salesrine, therefore this sale. There are 24 head of 
horses in training including Giro, Glissando, Dura, Coda, 
Dolore, Fura, Gravita, a full brother to Crescendo, and 
other good ones. Among the two year olds are colts and 
fillies by imp. Foul Shot, son of Musket, Crescendo j 
Brioso, Drum Major and other well bred stallions. 
There are some very choice animals in this consignment. 
Catalogues with pedigrees and full information will be 
ready next Wednesday. This will be the best thorough- 
bred horse sale of the season in California. 



AN EPISODE that threatened for a time to cause 
an open rupture between the two jockey clubs of this 
city has been settled. Secretary R. B. Milroy, of the 
California Jockey Club, while walking through the 
paddock at Tanforan Paik met Edward Corrigan and 
addressed him, offering to shake his hand at the same 
time. Mr. Corrigan, who was denied the privilege of 
racing at the Oakland track, not only refused to shake 
the proffered fist, but shook his own and used language 
not considered the proper thing in polite hone circles 
President Williams, hearing of the affair, wrote to the 
officers of the Western Turf Association asking that an 
apology be made. The said officers held a meeting, 
heard testimony, decided that the apology was due, and 
war is averted. 



GOOD STALLIONS that possess all the qualifica- 
tions for great sires, have lived a life of obscurity and 
left but a small posterity simply because their owners 
lacked sufficient enterprise to advertise them to the pub- 
lic, while inferior horses have been patronized and ac- 
quired a high place on the roll of honor through judi- 
cious booming that attracted the best mares in that 
locality to their harem, thus making them great by their 
progeny. Every horse in California that is good enough 
to be kept entire and stood for public service is entitled 
to have his name, oreeding and fee stated in the Breeder 
and Sportsman, the only journal in the State devoted 
to the horse breeding business. The service fee received 
for breeding one mare will generally cover the entire 
expense of advertising a stallion, and the owner will 
then have the satisfaction of knowing that the name of 
his horse has at least been kept before the breeders dur- 
ing the season and that he has done his part toward 
calling attention to his good qualities. In this day of 
rush and enterprise advertising is absolutely necessary 
in any business. 

A FEW PATERNALISTS in New York want the 
authorities to pass a law to the effect that no racing 
association in that State shall give any purse of less 
than $1000 in value. The excuse given for asking this 
of the Legislature is that horse owners, owing to the 
small purses given on many tracks, are compelled to race 
their horses for the money they can make out of wagers, 
and this leads to crookedness. This is an "amoosin'' 
statement, to say the least. When the State has to take 
charge of racing and fix the size of the purses, it may 
as well "go the limit" and make race tracks State prop- 
erty and have all the officers appointed by the Governor. 
Any person who does not want to ruo his horse for less 
than a $1000 purse is not compelled to enter him, and 
the excuse that smaller purses make dishonest racing is 
simply a subterfuge. It is the system of bookmaking 
in which associations look to the betting privilege for 
the greater part of their revenue that is the cause of the 
trouble of which the horse owners complain. 



THE BEST WAY for a district fair association to 
secure a desired date is to hold an early meeting of 
the directors, announce a program and claim the dates 
on which the fair will be given. This is a case where 
those that announce first are best entitled to the date. 
If the week selected is the one desired by the people of 
the district and best suits their convenience, there need 
be but little fear that some other association on the 
same circuit will select a date that conflicts with it. 
The State Fair date cannot be taken by any district 
association, but each should select a date that will make 
its fair drop into its proper place on the circuit, the sub- 
ject of short railroad hauls to and from the meeting be- 
ing one of the particular subjects to take into considera- 
tion. If a conference of district secretaries could be 
held they would be able to arrange a circuit satisfactory 
to the majority. 



Fontanita's Four Foale. 

Ao Oakland physician has four young horses, all from the 
mare Fcntanita, a daughter of Antevolo (sire of 14 standard 
performers) and Fontana (dam of Silas Skinner 2:17, Flora 
Belle 2:25 and San Diego, sire of Lottie 2:16$), by the great 
AlmoDt 33. 

Tbe ol ltet of these young horses is a biy gelding by Diablo 
2:09J, sire of Clipper 2:09}, Daedalion 2:11, Dia wood 2:11, 
Hi j > el Diablo 2:11$ and eight others with records better 
than 2:25. He will be five years old this spring, is a good 
looker and a trotter. The next is a full brother one year 
younger, but is a p»cer and fast, having Bhown a quarter in 
40 seconds to a road cart, with no training whatever. 

The three and the two year oldj are b itb fillies and are by 
McKinney 2:11}, sire at twelve years of age of eleven in the 
2:15 list. The three year old is a handsome black and is 
certainly a trotter if there ever was one. She has never been 
trained, hut when broken as a two year old was taken to the 
Alamedi track one Jay and driven a quarter in 49 seconds 
easily. Sheistntered in the Pacific Breeders' Futurity, to 
be trotted this year, tbe value of which is $1000. Her foil 
sister is a b»v fi . I v coming two years old, and has never been 
broken, but is ebtered in the Occident Stake for next year. 

If these youngsters are trained and raced (hey will cer. 
lainly place Fontanita in the list of great brood mares before 
the year is ended, and it is to ba hoped their owner will de- 
cide to so do with them 

Salvini 2:30, is a son of Piedmont 2:17L 

Uarolds Hoof Ointment contains one iogredient that in addition to 
its neallng properties, is an unfailing remedy tor and preventive of 
fever or beat Irom driving or any other cans**. This remedy Is manu- 
factured exclusively by Harrold <fc Co., 1013 Masonic Temple, ''bicago, 
111. Write for their book "The Fool of the horse." It will be sent 
free it tbe Breeder and Spobtiman U mentioned. 



January 13, 1900J 



21 



The Green Un's Gossip. t 

After an absence of nearly two years from California Dr. 
H. 8. Latham has returned here to spend the winter and sur- 
prised hie friends in the B. & S. office by dropping in on 
them this week. We had begun to think he had forsaken 
the golden slope for the blue grass country, having been 
located in Lexington during 1899, but he still has an affec- 
tion for the glorious climate of California. The Doctor 
looks just as he did two years ago, and can quote the pedigree 
of a horse off hand as correctly as ever. He says Lexington 
is the great horse centre of America, that buyers from Ger- 
many, France, Russia, Italy and England visit that city an- 
nually, while there is not a passenger train enters Lexington 
but one or more horee buyers arrive on the search for har- 
ness horses. The excellent roads and turnpikes leading out 
of the city are filled with horses being drilled to lift their 
knees, as the demand for high steppers is ahead of the supply 
all the time, and trotters that can trot bring ready money. 
Dr. Latham gave us news of some of the old horsemen who 
were former favorites here in California. AmoDg others he 
6poke of Geo'ge Starr, and says that he always has a fine 
string of trottere, all of them fit to take the word when the 
bell rings. He says that Starr it one of the most popular 
men on the grand circuit with track managers, horse owners 
and the general public. Marvin is still in Lexington in 
charge of Miller & Sibley's farm and horses, and he will 
have a number of horses out next season, which barring ac- 
cidents will trot better that 2:10. Marvin was here at Palo 
Alto for fourteen years, and in that time developed horses 
which took every world's record. We are glad to hear of 
his prosperity and that time has dealt gently with him. 
The Doctor says that he actually looks younger than he did 
when he left California five years ago. 



Among the visitors to the Breeder and Sportsman office 
this week was Mr. Chas. R. Hoppin, of Yolo county, who 
was down on business connected with the District Fair Asso- 
ciation. The property on which the Woodland race track 
is situated belongs to a lady who resides in this city, and Mr. 
Hoppin and Sam Montgomery, another member of the 
Board, were trying to secure the track for the meeting this 
year. Mr. Hoppin bred and owned that great pacing mare, 
Yolo Maid 2:12, by Alexander Button, out of Molly by 
Deitz's St. Clair, and said one of the mistakes of bib life was 
in not giving Yolo Maid the champion record for pacing 
mares when he had the opportunity. The mare paced trials 
here in California in 2:08 and could have been driven in 2:04, 
he thinks, easily enough. Geo. Wocdard, owner of Alex 
Button, naturally enough advised Mr. Hoppin to give her 
the record, but Johnny Goldsmith, looking to future races, 
strongly advised against it, and Mr. Hoppin did not start her 
for the mark. Then Yolo Maid went East and got into 
different hands and though pacing some wonderful miles 
was generally up against Hal Pointer 2:04 and other fast 
ones and was not in condition for a champion record. Mr. 
Hoppin says the Maid always trotted when he owned her 
until called upon for extreme speed, when she would change 
to the lateral gait. He has two full sisters of Yolo Maid, 
one five and one four years old, neither of which has been 
trained. Old Molly is dead. Her last foal, a three year old 
now, by Waldstein, is the only natural pacer she ever 
dropped and he paced as soon as he could stand up. He has 
not been trained, but shows speed and would certainly be 
fast if worked. He is not as rugged an appearing colt as the 
Buttons, but is more racy looking. 



It is a settled fact that Andy McDowell will train several 
horses belonging to the Parkville Farm of J. H. Shults- 
Here is what a New York paper said about him the other 
day: "Anny McDowell came over from his new quarters fl( 
John H. Shults' Parkville Farm yesteiday, looking as gay a 
high-spirited two year old turned Iocs9 on a rich, sunny 
pasture. He is enthusiastic about his new string which has 
been placed under his care by Mr. Shults, and feels confident 
of beirg able to win fame and purses with them next season. 
He says the mile track on the farm is in good shape and he 
has been able to jog the horses almost every day so far. He 
has been fitted out with a new lot of working carts, harness 
and all that sort of thing and has settled down to a winter's 
hard work. He will have twelve all told in his stable, among 
them six or seven green ones of high breeding and rare 
promise. The others are record horses, among them Pasonte, 
with a four year old record of 2:13, and is credited with a 
trial of 2:10} . She is a handsome bay mare, bred at the 
Palo Alto Stock Farm, by Palo Alto 2:08}, .lam Sontsg 
Dixie, by Toronto 6ontag. Last season she was only beaten 
by a nose in 2:10 by Tommy Britton, over the Cleveland 
track during the summer meetirg. She had one or two little 
faults, but Andy says she is now going just as true as a die 
and shows every element of great racing ability. 'And that 
mare Bertie R ," said Mac, "is a wonder. She is certainly 
one of the best going mares I have ever seen, and if she can 
be raced this year, I feel satisfied that she will be a good one 
in her class, the 2:12. While, as you know, there is nothing 
> gainst her in this country, still some of the members of the 
Board of Review appeared to think she is under a cloud here 



because of her suspension or expulsion'in France, whatever it 
is, and Mr. Shuilz is not likely to ask that the cloud be re- 
moved in case it is decided that she cannot be raced on 
National Association tracks. She ought to be raced for she 
is a plumb good one and it would be a ehame to bar her.' 
About the famous stallion Directly 2:03}, Mr. McDowell 
said that he never saw such improvement in a horse's feet in 
so short a time as he has seen at the Sbultz farm The hoofs 
have been spread just right, and he now stands on »s well 
shaped feet as any horse. It will be remembered that 
Directly was bought by Mr. 8hults last November at Madison 
Square Garden ior $3000. He will be bred to several of the 
high class mares at Shultsharst and Parkville." 

Sam Gamble has retired from the horse business. This 
announcement may be something of a surprise to his many 
friends all over America, but it is true, nevertheless. He 
came into the B. and 8. office last week and told us the 
news. 8am says he expects to never again take a carload 
of horses across the continent. Hu has shipped more than 
a thousand and never lost one, so that his record will be a 
hard one to beat, and as for prices, he has sold many of the 
top notchers. When John Lachman was elected Sheriff last 
November he told Mr. Gamble he would enter his name in 
the Deputy Stake, and Sam scored up for the word last Mon- 
day. He drew an inside position and his place is at the 
Industrial 8chool, where he is on duty every day. We hope 
he will be pleased with his new plice. He says he will con- 
sider it part of his duty to give a little fatherly advice and a 
few kind words to the young fellows out there, and if be can 
make even one of them realize that it will be more profitable 
to walk in the straight path after leaving the institution, he 
will consider he has accomplished something in life. 



Death of J. H. Sanders 

J. H. Sanders, author of several books on cattle and horse 
breeding and founder of that excellent j )urnal, the Breeders' 
Gazette of Chicago, committed suicide in Memphis, Tenms. 
see, December 22d. The deceased first became known to the 
public as editor of the trotting department of The Spirit of 
the Times in the early seventies. He was a thorough, prac- 
tical horsemen, and a clever newspaper man. His fancies 
however, ran more to other live stock — cattle, sheep, etc. — 
than to horses. Early in 1876 he left The Spirit of the 
Times and went to Chicago and founded the Breeders' 
Gazette. He edited the Breeders' Trotting Stud Book, pub- 
lished in 1881 under the auspices principally of Kentucky 
breeders who were dissatisfied with the methods of Mr. 
Wallace. This was really the beginning of the movement 
which culminated in the purchase of the Wallace plant by 
the Register Association. The Breeders' Gazette was quit9 
successful under the management of Mr. Sanders. His son, 
A. H. Sanders, now one of the U. S. Commissioners from 
Illinois to the Paris Exposition, became associated with him 
in the proprietorship of the piper. Later the deceased sold 
his interest in the Gazatte and afterwards^met with reverses, 
both in money and health, and his mental powers failed to 
some extent. Despondency was probably the cause of the 
suicide. 



D E. Knight's Will. 

The will of the late D. E. Knight, was filed for probate at 
Marysville last Monday. It declares all the property com- 
munity and all is left to the widow excepting the following 
bequests: To a brother, John D. Knight, $1000; Albert J. 
Knight, a brother, and bis wife, $5000 each; Emily Camp, a 
niece, $3000; Abbie Swift, niece, $1000; Thomas Severson, 
Charles Peterson, James Van Buskirk, John Sullivan, Frank 
Swifi, employes, twenty five shares of gas stock each, valued 
at $2500; Rosie Johnson, a servant, $500; Thomas Peirno, 
employe, twenty-five shares of the Marysville and Yuba City 
Street Railway stock; T. J. Sherwood, all the stock and in- 
terest deceased held in the Marysville Democrat, newspaper. 
Ladies' Relief Society, Catholic Ladies' Relief 8ociety' 
Marysville Benevolent Association, $1000 each. A. C. 
Bingham is given $8000 A. C. Bingham and Marv A. 
Knight are executors without bonds. The estate is estimated 
at $150,000. A writer in the Marysville Democrat states 
that to his personal knowledge Mr. Knight gave away in 
charity durioghis residence in Marysville the sum of $30,000 
Verily this is in itself a monument more lasting than "storied 
urn or animated bust." 

Trotting Horae Men Confer. 

New York, January 11. — The representatives of the 
National Trotting Association and the American Trotting 
Association were in conference here all day. Tbey adopted 
a resolution providing that a'l fines, or rather penalties, 
imposed by either parent association, through its members 
or otherwise, shall be enforced by both associations. 

The resolution also provides thai neither association wil] 
receive in its membership a member of the other association 
after leaving that body. 

The rules of both associations are being revised with a 
view to making them uniform. All proceedings are subject 
to the approval of the congress of the associations. 



Tanforan Park Summaries. 



I WESTERN TURF ASSOCIATION.] 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 4. 

One mile. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse $4G0— 
Bishop Reed 102 (Vlttltoe) 15 to 1 won, Cyril 101 second, Red Pirate 97 
third. Topmast, scotch Piaid, Decoy, Dolore, Cromwell. Time 1:42V 

One and one-eighth miles. Selling Three year olds and upward. 
Purse 8100— Imperious 109 (E Jones) 5 to 2 won. Meadowthorpe 112 
second, Glengaber 99 third. Rapido, Rixford. O'Connor. Time 1-65%. 

One mile, .-elllng. Three year olds and upward. Purse SlOu— 
Geyser 109 (Spencer) 1 to 6 won. Advance Guard 102 second, Bogus 
Bill 90 third. F. W. Brode, Eiustein. Time 1:42%. 

One and one-sixteenth miles. Baden Stakes. Three year olds and 
upward. Value $1200— Timemaker 110 (Bullman) 4 to 1 won, Potente 

110 second, iZoroaster 114 third Daisy F., Los Medanos, Morinel, 
Casdale, Tappan. Time 1 :49. 

Six furlongs. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse 1400— 
Thomas Carey 91 (J Walsh) 10 to 1 won, San Augustine 1C6 second, 
Modwera 106 third. Leipsig, Pongn, Momentum, William F., Delecta, 
Don Quixote, St. Isidore, The Offering. Time 1:15%. 

Seven furlongs. Four year old's and upward. Purse 8100— San 
Venado 105 (Jenkins) 3 to 5 won, Hard Knot 105 second, Lady Meddle- 
some 97 third. Braw Lass, Charles La Bel, Ricaido. BaliBta. 
Time 1:28V • I 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5. 

Five and a half furlongs. Selling. Four year olda and upward. 
Purse 81 m— Genna 91 (Phelan) 13 to 6 won. Monda 97 second, ( lar- 
ando 94 third Katie Gibbons, Terrene. Sallie Goodwin, Pat Murphy, 
Storm Kiug, Romany, Gold Baron, Anlioch. Time 1:08V 

Five furlongs. Selling. Mares. Four year olds and upward. 
Purse 8100- Loving Cup 105 (E. Jones! 2 io i won. Miss Marion 103 
second, Juva 101 third. Lady Heloise, Jingle Jingle, El Salado, 
Racery. Time 1:02 V 

One mile. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse §100— 
White Fern 106 (E. Jones) 9 to 2 won. Ping 109 second, Racivan 106 
third. S. Danenbaum, Faversham, Vassal, Champion Rose, Collins. 
Time 1:45V 

Seven furlongs. Three years old and upward. Purse 8500— Geyser 

111 (Spencer) 1 to 6 won, Afamada 109 second. Bathos 103 third. 
Time 1:30. 

Six furlongs. Selling Three year olds and upward. Purse 8100 
—Good Hope 98 (T. Walsh) 13 to 2 won, Maud Ferguson 102 fecoud, 
Silver rone 108 third. Glissando, Toribio, Amasa, Aluminum, An- 
toinetta, Will Fay, Mike Rice. Time 1:15. 

Five and a half furlongs. Three year olds. Purse 8400— Alice 
Dougherty 110 (Vittitoe) 4 to 5 won. Limerick 112 second, Choteau 

111 third. Isaline, Redwald, Racetto, Giro, Fine Shot, Florabird, 
Favorito. Time 1:09%. 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6. 

Five furlongs. 8elling. Maidens. Four year olds and upward. 
Purse 8100— A. Baldwin Sr.. 106 (Vittitoe) 6 to 1 won. Miss Reel 96 
secono, Braw Lass 100 third. Cymona, Wild Het, Jockey Bid . Miss 
Soak, Florence Fink, Delecta, Felicite, Hunch, The Offering. 
Time 1 :02V 

Three furlongs. Two year olds. Purse 8100— Sofala 105 (Bullman) 
6 to 1, Rathgar 105 second, Laura Marie 107 third. Lily Diggs, Car- 
Ionian, Woeful, Moonbrighi. Time 0:36V 

One mile. 8elling. Three year olds and upward. Purse 8400— Red 
Pirate 103 ( Henry) 4 to 5 won. Alifia 103 second, Summer 88 third. 
Terrene Rapido, Rixford, Gibbettiflibbet, Greyhurst, Prestome, Mod- 
wena, Midian. Time 1:44. 

One mile and a quarter. Selling. Three year olds and upward. 
Purse 85u0— Daisy F., 104 ( 'enkins) 8 to 5 won. Potente 107 second, 
scotch Plaid 106 third. Topmast, Meadowthorpe, Tappan. 
Time 2:08. 

One mile and an eighth. Hurdle handicap. Four year olds and 
upward. Purse 8400— Rio Chico 126 (Moody) 12 to 1 won, University 
125 second. Meddler 130 third. Granger, Monita, Rossmore, Una 
Colorado, Fl Fi, Watossa, Lomo, Duke of York II. Time 2:08V 

One mile and a half. Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse 
8400— Chimura 101 (Vittitoe) 2 to 1 won, Forte 105 second, Morinel 103 
third. Time 2:37 V 

MONDAY, JANUARY 8. 

Five furlongs. Selling. Four year olds end upward. Purse 8400— 
Theory 129 ( lenkins) 8 to 5 won, Sweet William 136 second, Faver- 
sham 144 third. Credo, Yaruba, Gov. Sheehan. Time 1:01 V 

On° mile. 8elling. Four year olds and upward. Purse 8400— 
Glengaber 109 (8pencer) 12 to 1 won, Stuttgart 107 second, Storm King 

118 third, Lena. Coda, Dr. Marks, O'Connor, Glen Ann, Tom Crom- 
well, Kastaine. Time 1:44. 

One mile. Selling Three year olds. Purse 8400— Wallenstein 109 
(Spencer) 7 to 10 won, Ailenna 101 second, Mont Eagle 105 third. S. 
Daunenbaum, Sunello, Ziska. Thomas Carey. Time 1:41. 

One mile and a sixteenth. Handicap. Three year olds and up- 
ward. Purse $ )00— Zoroaster 114 (Spencer) 9 to 2 won, Daisy F. 101 
second, Marcato 114 third. Formero, San Venado. Time 1 :49V 

Six furlongs. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse 8400 
—Afamada 109 (lenkius) 9 to 5 won, Cyril 107 second Glissando 92 
third. St. Cuthbert, Mocorito. Time 1:14%. 

Seven furlongs Three year olda and upward. Purse $100— Duko 
ot York 112 (Henne>sey) 100 to 1 won, Nance O'Nell 92 second. 8ugden 

112 third. Hattie Fox, Hiero, Collius, Caesar Young, Redwald. The 
Offering, Favorito, Firelight II., Modwena, Cipriano. 1 ime 1:28%. 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9. 

8lx furlongs. Selling. Maidens. Three year olds and upward. 
Purse 8100— Braw Lass 117 (Spencer) 6 to 1 won, First Shot 101 second, 
Mi-s Soak 117 third. Master Lee, Colonel Root, Isa'ine, Tekla, March 
Seven, Tom Sharkey, Miss Vera, Florence Fink, Fille d'Or, Illilouette 
Timo 1:16. 

Ono mile. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse $100— 
Toribio 105 (lenkins) 9 to 5 won, Rixford 85 second, Dolore 103 third. 
Melkarth, Gold Baron, Champion Rose, Orribee, Lucid. Time 1:13. 

One mile. Selling. Four year olds and upward Purse $400— 
Tirade 112 (Couley) 8 to 6 won. Sardouic, 109 second, Whaleback 109 
third. Iuverary II., Batista, Watossa, Greyhurst. Time 1:43V 

Seven furlongs. Three year olds and upward. Purse 8100— Geyser 

119 (Spencer) 4 to 5 won, Bannockhurn 107 Becond, Tar Hill 94 third, 
Storm King, The Fretier. T3me IJ!7V 

One mile. 8elllug. Three year olds and upward. Purse $400— 
Del Paso II. 108 (Spencer) 14 to 5 won, Tom Cromwell 108 second 
Donator 105 third. Alicia, O'Donnor, Midian. Time 1:43V 

Five turlongs. Three year olda and upward. Purse 8400-St. 
Casslmir 101 (Vittitoe) 9 to 5 won, Oliuthus 108 second, Frank Bell. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10. 

8ix fur ongs. Selling. Three years old and upward. Purse $400— 
Wild Het 105 (N. Hill) 8 to 1 won, March Seven 95 Becond, Charles 
Le Bel 107 third. Miss ;soak, Pongo, Cipriano, St. Isidor, Uucle 
True, St. Agnes, P. F. Time 1:14V 

One mile and a quarter. Hurdlo Handicap. Three years old and 
uoward Puree $100— Lomo 107 (p. Henry) 40 to 1 won, Monita 155 
second, University 133 third. Grauger, Una Colorado, Watossa, Rio 
Chi o, Rossmore. Time 2:18. 

One mile. Selling. Three yeare old and upward. Purse $100— 
Merry Boy 109 (Thorpe) 11 to 2 won. White Fern 106 second. Ping 
105 third. Racivan, Ailenna. Faversham, Facade, Silver Tall, 
Espionage. Time 1:42. 

8ix furlongs. Selling. Three years old and upward. Puree 8100 
—Grand Sachem 107 (T. Walsh) 5 to 2 won, Croker 107 second, Man 
Augustine 107 third Sugoon. Mclvlu Burnham, Remus, Zurich, 
Antler, Duke of Y.irk II. Time 1:14V 

8lx furlongs. Handicap. Three years old and upward. Puree 
$400— Loving Cup 108 (Th rpe) IS to S won, Tlmemn ker 120 second, 
Montallade 94 third. St. Cuthbert, imp. Mistral II., Aluminum. 
Time 1:18V 

Six furlongs. Selling. Three yea's old and upward. Purse $400 
—Jockey Bill 109 (Ktley) 100 to I won, Clarando 104 second, Ter- 
rene 104 third. Hohenlobe, Glissando, Druidoss, Juva, Libertine, 
Hunch, Time 1:15. 



To the Deaf — A rich ladv, cured of her Deafness and 
Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drum, 
gave $10,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people unable to 
procure the Ear Drums may have them free. Address No. 
680 C, The Nicholson Institute, 780 Eighth Avenue, New 
York. * 



<&lje gveebev onto *?pcvt*mcnu 



[January 13, 190 



The Sulky. 



The year opens well. 



Buyers are looking for sellers. 



EntbiiS in the harness slakes are large. 



There will be a good circuit in California this year. 



Orangb County fair directors will meet Jinuary 22J. 



Cbase A Mendenhall's sale of trotters next Tuesday. 



My Trinket, by Slamboul out of Trinket 2:14, will be 
raced this year. 

Wm Frazibr has sold Kittitas RaDger 2:15, lo a Mr. 
Clark of Seattle. 



The admission fees at the trotting meetings in Austria ar 1 
10, 20 and 50 cents and $2 00. 



Iago 2:11, is being driven on the New York speedway and 
but faw of them can outbrush them. 



Mr Galleagos, of Mission San Jose, will send quite a 
string of horses to Pleasanton to be trained. 



Old Fantasy 2:06 is to be trained again and it is believed 
that after three years of rest she will be bt to race. 



A fleet of five steamers has been fitted up especially to 
carry horses and will ply between New York and Liverpool. 



SrjKOL 2:0s} will be sold at auction next month. 8he cost 
the late Robert Bonner $41,000. How much will she bring? 



C. J. Hamlin says he bad rather see The Abbot and The 
Monk trot in 2:06 to pole, than have The Abbot beat the 
2:03$ of Alix. 

Forty -fouk out of fifty original entries have made second 
payment in the Stanford Stake of 1901, to be trotted at the 
State Fair. 

Monterey 2:09}, will make the season of 1900 at Lexing- 
ton instead of Louisville as has been stated in some of ih 
tuif journals. 

R. C. Estill has been elected a director of tbe Kentucky 
Trotting Horse Breeders Association to succeed the late 
Major McDowell. 



There are 552 horses at Village Farm. Heir at Law is 
jogging sound again. It will be remembered that he broke 
his leg last year. 

Third payment has been made on 22 entries for the 
Occident Stake for 1900. It should bring out the largest 
field of the race. 



Sir Gird 2:26} by Woolsey, hitched with a mate, tiotted 
a trial mile at Los Angeles last week in 2:38 and the pair 
was sold for $1200. 



Matinee horses that are fast enough to keep up with the 
procession are very scarce in Cleveland and there is a great 
deal of rustling going on to set hold of some good ones 



One of the good road horses on the Indianapolis drive- 
ways is tbe twenty-seven year old Little Wonder 2:30, by 
Blue Bull 75. He holds his own with the most of them. 



Potential, the eight year old son of Prodigal put six new 
ones in the list last year and is now the sire of eight standard 
performers. His dam, Helen T , is a full sister to Arion 

2::07i. 

One of the great prospects for tbe eastern stakes is a geld- 
ing owned by F. 8. Davy of Ni»e»ra Falls. He is by Am- 
bassador and out of Suisun 2:18$, the old mare by Elec- 
tioneer. 



Nutwood blood is valuable in broodmares. There is a 
mare to be sold at Chase & Mendenhall's sale next Tuesday 
that is by a grandson of Nutwood out of one of his grand 
daughters. 



A gray pacing mire that is well bred and one cf the fast- 
est green ones ever hooked up will be sold at auction next 
Tuesday at Chase & Mendenhall's sale. She is a good pros- 
pect for some trainer. 



Dirkct's sons and daughters seem to meat with raadv sale 
There are a half dnznn in this State that will bring all the 
way from $2000 to $5000, the latter price having been refused 
for one very recently. 

There will be a good opportunity to get a good road horse 
or a racing prospect at Cbase & Mendenhall's sale next Tues- 
day at their salesyard corner Van Ness avenue and Market 
street. See advertisement. 



Mr Gto. H. Mokris, of Winters, has booked bis mare 
Algenia (the dam of Kelly Briggs 2:10$) by Algona, to Alta- 
mont. The old horse will have some very choice mares 
mated with him this year. 



Creeceos 2:07 J will be kept out of tbe stud during 1900, 
and raced in tbe free-for-alls by George Ketcham. They 
expect him to cut bis present record a few seconds, and ap- 
proximate Directum's mark. 



A dispatch from Louisville says that President Douglass, 
of the Louisville Association, has made an cffer lo the stock- 
holders for their stock in order that he may be prepared to 
present the entire stock to some intending Eastern buyers. 
Secretary Frank Kenney says that if the deal now on is con- 
summated meetings may be given at Louisville next spring 
and fall. 



John Blue, after a month's reit, during which tim« he 
visited his numerous friends in Sacramento, Sjlano and Yolo 
counties, has returned lo Pleasanton and is at work on the 
horses which are in the Keating string. 



L. L. D. 2:08}, is a full brother to the Rinrho del Paso 
sta Hit n, Knight, being by Woodford Wilkes out of China 
Wilkes, and this mare has also produced Ooeone 2:11}, and 
Jenny Wilkes 2:12$, and has two producing daughters. 



The stallion Altago, by Almc.nl, dam Maggie Arnold, by 
Almont Mambrino, was found dead in his stall on the farm 
of his owners McKnight Bros, of Talisman, Oregon, re- 
cently. With the very poorest of opportunities be sired five 
2:30 performeis. 



Aladdin, twent)-six years old; Alert, twenty six; Chester 
Chief, twenty-eight; Dean Sage, twenty-sever : Leland, twenty- 
five; Marlborough, twenty-five; Polonius, twenty-eight; Rich- 
wood, twenty-eigbi; Sir Walkill, twenty-four, and Artemas, 
thirty, are the (en entire sons of Hambletonian 10 that still 
live. 



Matt Dwyeb is training twenty likelv young horses at 
the Parkway half mile track near New York, and says the 
brown gel. ling Dreyfus by Dexler Prince is the star of the 
lot. Dwyer says he is certain Dreyfus is gocd for a mark of 
2:10. This horse was bred at A. B. Spreckels' Aplos Farm 
and was taken E st by Samuel Gamble lost November and 
Bold for $1360. 



John Tucker, who worked with Charles Marvin at Palo 
Alto for a long lime, will have some choice young (rollers 
to campaign next season for the Locust Grove Stock Farm, 
Newcastle, Pa. In addition to the half brother to Idolita 
and the colt Mendell, by Monaco, be will have Flamingo C. 
2:25, by St. Vincent; Jean Lee 2:18}, by West Wilkes, and 
several good ones. 



C.J. Hamlin has not definitely decided whether he will 
campaign bis recent purchase, Direct Hal, during 1900, bis 
inclination being to save tbe colt for another season. Sev- 
eral Village Farm mares will be bred to the youngster, Lady 
of the Manor 2:04} among the number, piovided it is decided 
she will not again stand training. Several other ma>es that 
have shown an incli nation to pace or produce pacers will be 
bred to him. 



Secrktaky Frank Kinney, of the Louisville Driving 
and Fair Association, which has suspended, it is said, will 
accept tbe position of secretary of an association at Pittsburg, 
Pa. Kinney has been with the Louisville association for two 
years and has made many friends. He is a pupil of that 
master of secretaries, Ed A. Tipton, now of the Fas : g-Tiplon 
Company, New York, and bad the Louisville management 
been able to hold on two or three years, it is believed ihe 
association would have merited the patronage for the lack of 
which it was forced to close its gates. 



One of the handsomest mares in this citv is a large, light 
bay or chestnut daughter of Wild Boy She is owned by 
Mr. Ed Hinkie. who drives her on the road, and it is said bag 
speeded ber a quarter in 30 seconds more than once. T. E. 
Keating looked her over and suggested that be could take 
tbe mare over the Eastern circuit and give her a low record 
and win money with her. Mr. Hinkie says be does not 
need the money just now and does not particularly care for 
her to have a record. He takes great pleasure in driving 
her as she is a perfect roadster. 



Oakwood Park Stock Farm's first foal of the year ar- 
rived January 7tb, and ought to develop into one of the 
great ones bred at this celebrated farm. Tbe "warm baby" 
is a chestnut colt by 0#yhee 2:11, one of the best winners 
on tbe Eastern circuit last season, and is out of Bertha, Ibe 
daughter of Alcantara that has produced Diablo 2:09}, Elf 
2:12$, Ed L 3 fLrty 2:16$. Jay Efl Bee (1) 2:26$, and two 
others Demonio and Don Derby that will get fust marks this 
year. The breeding of tbe first youngster of the new year is 
indeed royal and we understand his looks are in keeping 
with his magnificent blocd lines. 



Mr. C. Christie, a prominent contractor of Kansas City, 
Missouri, has been in California for a couple of weeks, ac 
companied by the well known Western trainer R. C. BensoD, 
looking for horses. He has made several purchases, among 
them the good (rotter Dr. Frasse 2:12$ by Iran Alto 2:12}. 
We understand the price was over a thousand dollars From 
R H. Pearson of Walsonville he purchased Anita 2:16} by 
Junio, paying $750 for her. At Los Angeles be picked up 
several, among them a gieen filly bv McKinney 2:11}, which 
he secured at auction at the bid of $600. Mr. Benson ex- 
pects to ship ihe horses to Kansas City next week and will 
put them in the car at San Jose. 



This is the story of the conversation that took place when 
Ed Geere sold Direct Hal by Direct 2:05$ to Mr. J. Ham- 
lin a few weeks ago. Geers bad been talking about the 
coil's great speed and Mr. Hamlin remarked to a bystander: 
"Geers musl have a good thing in that coll, he won't sell 
him nor let me have a half interest in him even." Then, 
turning suddenly to Geers, the master of Village Farm said, 
"Gters, I'll give you $10,000 for tbat colt.'' (leers was 
astonished, and in a dumbfounded way replied, "$10,000 is a 
good lot of money, Mr. Hamlin." The offer was renewed, 
and the next remark of Geers was, ''He's yours, Mr. Ham- 
lin." This is the highest price ever paid for a three year 
old pacer. 



In the lists of 2:30 horses published in tbe turf papers 
Secretary, son of Director, is given as having but two new 
oneB in the list in 18*9. When the Year Book is out this 
number will probably be increased to four. The ones given 
are Senator 2:26} and Hazel Y. 2:17. To be added to these 
are a son of Secretary, belonging to Dr. Powell Reeves, that 
took a record of 2:27 or close to it at a meeting in the State 
of Washington, and a gray mare driven by H H. Hellman 
that took as andard record in a match race at Hoi lister some 
time last year. We are given this information by Mr. 
Frszer, owner of Secietary, who does not know the names of 
the new performers, but we hope to get tbem, together with 
their breeding on the dam's side, in time for publication 
next week. 



The cfficers of the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' 
Association are highly pleased with the second payments in 
the Kentucky Futurity, and the prospects for all tbe slakes 
Jo be decided the coming year filling well. Secretary Wilson 
is one of tbe best secretaries in the business, and the affairs 
of the association at the recent meeting of the Board of 
Directors were found to be in splendid condition. It is in- 
tended to continue the meeting this fall on the same broad 
scale which has characterized this association in the past. 



The growth of the 2:10 list since 1883, when the first 2:10 
performer was recorded, has been remarkable. In the year 
named one pacer enter the list. The following year two 
(rotters entered, making a total of three. Not again until 
189d was there an addition to the list. In that year three 
pacers came in, making a total of six. In 1891 five trotters 
and one pacer entered making a total of twelve in nine 
years. In 1892 for the first time tbe list began a decided in- 
crease, nineteen new ones entering of which thirteen were 
pacers and six trotters. From 1882 to 1899 the list increased 
as follows: 1893, twenty-six; 1«94, thirty-three; 1895, sixty- 
Ihree; 1896, forty-seven; 1897, sixty-six; 1898, sixty-one; 
1899, seventy five. The total number to date is 402, of which 
110 are trotters and 292 pacers. 



Knap McCarthy was in New York the other day con- 
ferring with J. H. Bronson, owner of Searchlight. In an 
interview McCarthy said: "I am wintering in New York, 
handling three or four horses belonging to former Police 
Suterintendent Bvrnes. The best known of tbe small string 
I have now is Palmleaf 2:19$. If Mr. Bronson wants the 
world's record broken with Searchlight, all be has to do is to 
give the word. When the other world's champions were five 
y ears old all tbey could do was a mile in about 2:05. Search- 
light can cut tbe two-minute mark any time the order is 
given. I predict a great future for the horse. Aside from 
Searchlight if is d.fticult to pick the coming monarch of the 
turf. It is evident that Star Pointer will be out of the fast 
running and will never again, I believe, touch his present 
record The horse is in bad shape and has broken down 
once before. He is getting to be an old horse. I look for 
Anaconda to create seme new figures. The coming season 
will be one of the most prosperous in the history of the turf. 
Bigger purses than ever will be offered." 



The youngsters that will probably go Esst from Palo Alto 
to the Cleveland sale in May next are a two year old by 
Wildnut— Sweetwater by Stamboul; Adlin (1) by Adbell 
2:23— Linnet (3) 2:28$, sister to Whips; To Arms, grev 6lly 
(1), by Adbell— Sallie Benton (4) *27}, dam of Surpaf 2:10. 
Starlight 2:15} and Nordica (3) 2:10$; Sunolila, bay filly (2) 
by Advertiser 2:15} — Wapana, dam of Sunol 2:08}, this 
mare's first filly since Sunnl; Monaline, bay filly (1). by 
Mendjcino 2:19$— Palatine (3) 2:18, winner of seven straight 
raceB as a t»o year old, by Palo Alto; Azra, bay gelding, by 
Azmoor 2:20$— Ahwaga, full brother to A/mon 2:184; Alia 
Thorn, bay filly (1), bv Allivo 2:18$— Lilly Thorn Jr., half 
aisler to Santa Claue; Fieldborne, bay gelding (2), by Altivo 
2:18$— Mary Osborne 2:28}; chestnut filly (1), bv Advertiser 
2:15} — Rosemont, dam of Sweet Rose (1) xs5], Montrose (3) 
2:18, and Mazatlan 2:26} ; brown filly (1) by Mendocino — 
Jessie M.; Monibel. bay gelding (2), by Mendocino — Bonni- 
bel (4) 2:17}, and Belnut, bav gelding (1), by Wildnul— Bell 
Bird (1) 2:26}. This lot Mr. Covey calls "the cream of 
Palo Alto," and says (hat most of I hem are well engaged. 



John H. Phipien, who gave so many good horses their 
first lessons at Palo Alto, has been in California for a ten 
days' visit and left last Thursday for Dallas, Texai, where he 
is the trainer for Col. Exall, proprietor of (he Lomo Alto 
Stock Farm The premier stallion there is Eleclrite, son of 
Electioneer and Sprite by Belmont 64, and Mr. Phippen has 
more than twenty young horses bv him in (raining at the 
Dallas track. Electrite is also the sire of 36 standard per- 
formers and Phippen thinks will make a great showing with 
new ones this year. He has a four year old pacer in his 
string tbat is called DallaB Texas, wbicb is a wonderfully 
speedy youngster. Phippsn worked him a mile last year in 
his three year old form in 2:18, last half in 1:07, and last 
quarter in 31} seconds, and he did it so easily that they con- 
sider him about as good a pacer as lives He has paced 
quarters in 15 seconds repeatedly and has never yet been 
actually driven to his speed. Dallas Texas is by a son of 
Electrite called Dean Forrest that is out of a Nutwood mare. 
Mr. Phippen will race quite a large string of horses from 
Lomo Alto Farm through the Mississippi Valley circuits this 
year, and hopes io make a creditable showing with tbem. 
There is no more careful trainer or successful speed maker 
than J hn Phippen, and his California friends will wish him 
the very best of luck and success He looks as though the 
Texan climate just suited him, but says that while he likes 
his place and the people with whom he is connected there, 
he does miss the California climate. 



So much has been written in regard to the Missouri geld- 
ing Sagwa, that demonstrated his ability to trot in 2:10 or 
better, and that sold at the late Fasig-Tipton sale for $7100, 
that the Rural World thinks it proper to give his true breed- 
ing, obtained from J. W. Atterbury & Bro., Madison, Mo , 
who bred and raised (his now celebrated gelding: Sagwa, bg 
was sired by Saywa 12726, he by Onward 1411, record 2:25}, 
(he sire of 143 in tbe list. The dam of Sagwa is Abby West- 
wood by Weslwood 2363, second dam by Blackwood 74, third 
dam by Alexander's Norman. The gelding Sagwa's dam 
was by Berjimine's Whirlwind 2359, N. 8. B A., record 
2:30}, and is the sire of Binks 2:25$, Lady Mac 2:23, etc. 
Benjamine Whirlwind's dam was Arabian Maid by Vermont 
Morgan, second dam by Z lcadi, imported from Arabia, third 
dam by imp. Barefoot. Arabian Maid is full sister to Dor- 
sey's Golddust 150. There is not the slightest truth in the 
ttatement that Sagwa is by King Herod. To W. R Carter 
of Mexico, Mo., is due tbe credit of developing the great 
speed of 8sgwa in a very sho t period. Mr. Carter is one of 
the most careful, painstaking and skillful trainers in the 
State. He is always kind, but persevering, taking great 
pains to get the action just right by perfect shoeing and 
balancing. He never overshoots the mark by giving them 
too much speeding. He takes time to get his horse in per- 
fect condition before calling upon tbem for fast work. The 
tracks at Mexico, botb the kite-shaped and the half-mile are 
kept in best condition, and there are none in the State better 
to work horses upon. Mr Carter has developed the speed of 
many fast horses, and is de erviog "great credit for the ex- 
cellent work he did with Sagwa in so short a period. 



January 13, 1900] 



©Jje <§veei*cv two &vwi*m?Bu 



23 



The Saddle 

■ 

J. B. Haggin has ten stallions and 300 broodmares on bis 
Kentucky farm. 



Jockly Bound, who is riding for McCafferty, beads the 
list of winning jockeys at New Orleans. 



Barney Schrieber avowa his intention of racing in Ger- 
many this year with bis string of thoroughbreds. 



Ed Corrigan's entries in the English Derby will be four 
in number. Two are by Vassal and two by Indio. 



On Tuesday Buliman and Spencer finished heads apart on 
two occasions, the victory goiog to Spencer in both instances. 



The Jackson Day Handicap at 8t. Louis last Monday was 
won by Jollv Roger. The distance was a mile and a quarter 
and the time 2:09. 



P»esidfnt Ault of the Fair Grounds Racing Association 
at 8t. Louis, 6ays the meeting there will open May 12th and 
continue ninety days. 



Rio Chico made his initial start over the hurdles last 
week and jumped like a veteran, disposing of a fair field in 
a most workmanlike manner. 



The racing firm of Bromley & Co., so well known for a 
number of years, has passed out of existence. Mr. A. 
Featherstone will take up their entries and their stable. 



E. J. Baldwin has secured from Charles Boots, the good 
racehorse Vinctor, foaltd in 1892, by imp. Brutus, dam 
Mollie H., to mate with some of his choice-bred mares at 
Santa Anita Rincho. 



John S. Campbell, who trained Castaway II. when that 
horse won the Brooklyn Handicap in 1890, and Cassius 
when he ran second to Salvator in the Suburban, is wintering 
a small string at Dallas, Tex. 



Bollman was suspended by Mr. Caldwell for getting left 
with Mocorito last Monday. Bull mm has been out of luck 
lately at the start but be has certainly not been more unfor- 
tunate than Mr. Caldwell himself. 



The New Year's Handicap, one mile, at New Orleans, 
was the first three year old stake of tbe year and was won 
on Januarv 1st by Prince of Veronia, a bay colt by Cayuga, 
dam imp. Veronia, in 1:48. The track was heavy. 



Old Libertine, bolder of the world's record for a mile 
on a circular trace, bas probably run bis last race; he broke 
down badly on Thursday and Mr. BrowD, bis owner, thinks 
he will be unable to get tbe old horse again in condition. 



Loving Cop ran a remarkably good race, stepping the six 
furlongs in l.l'.U and experiencing no difficulty in disposing 
of Timemaker and other good onee, notwithstanding the fact 
that she was away badly and had to make up a lot of ground. 



Information comes from Cincinnati that "several 
wealthy and influential racing men of New York City will 
invest lots of money in the Oakley track, providing a pool 
law can be pushed through the State Legislature this winter. 



It is a most entertaining sight to watch Mr. Corrigan 
cooling out Geyser after a race; he keeps the horse in the 
paddock and attends personally to all his wants leading bim 
about rubbing and coddiing bim like a child with a new 
doll. 



Braw Lass on Tuesday last finally succeeded in gaining 
winning brackets after several attempts in bad fields of 
horses. First Shot was backed for a good thing and held the 
lead until near the finish when Spencer brought up Braw 
Lass and won cleverly on the post. 



The Ormonde-Miss Brummel colt, which is now a two 
year old will be sent to Eoglacd and trained for the Derby 
of next year in which he is entered John Porter, who 
trained Ormonde, and who says be never saw one as good, 
will train this son of tbe great horse. 



Ferbier, formerly one of the most useful horses in train- 
ng, ended his career a few 'days ago at Iogleside. The old 
horse, after many years on the flat was put to the jumping 
game and while being schooled irjured himself in such a 
manner that his trainer was forced to destroy him. 



Iockey Spencer is not displaying the horsemanship 
which landed bim first on tbe list of winning j ickeys for 
1899. His work in the saddle of late has been characterized 
by extreme carelessness and some of bis rides seem to be 
wilfully lacking in ju 'gment for one of his experience and 
ability. 



Tbe Crescent City Jockey Club has offered three prizes 
for tbe jickeys having the best percentages at the close of 
the meeting. March 24'h Tbe money will be divided aa 
follows: $100 first prize. $30 second and $20 third. Should 
a j ickey be suspended for fraud he will not receive any of 
the prize money. 



Tommy Griffin has a good one in Theory, a four year 
old filly which took up 129 pounds and ran five furlongs in 
1:01} eased up at the finish. Tbe fruits of the victory were 
taken from Mr. (iriffin as his mare was run up $400 above 
her entered price; he is said to have backed her heavily in 
the Eastern pool rooms. 



It has been decided to retire Ben Holladay permanently 
from racing and be will go into the stud at the farm of his 
owners, Messrs. Eastin & Larabie, near Lexington, Ky. Ben 
Holladay is a bay horse, foaled 1893, by Hanover, dam 
Mollie L. by Longfellow, out of Mollie McCann by Hunter's 
Lexington. He was a great race horse over a distance and 
should be a successful sire. 



Lomo displayed a striking reversal of form in the hurdle 
race and the stewards called for the bookmakers sheets, but 
on examination it was discovered that Lomo was practically 
unbacked. 



Mfs. BffcON McClelland has again been unfortunate in 
losing tbe second of the get of those great turf celebrities, 
He.iry of Navarre and Sallie McClelland. Their first foal 
was crushed by her dam, and while barely escaping with ber 
life, is unfit for racing. Recently her weanling brother has 
died, 



Choker was made the medium of a plunge by Frank Mc- 
Mabon and his friends, and although Thorpe got him away 
fifing, he was forced to content himself with second honor, as 
Grand Sachem won in a gallop. Croker and Grand Sachem 
are full brothers and were bred at Marcus Daly's Bitter Root 
Stock Farm. 



Eddie Ross had a narrow escape from serious injury in 
the two year old race on Saturday; his mount reared at tbe 
post and fell bfekwards, throwing Ross, who pluckily held 
on to the bridle and prevented the filly from running away 
notwithstanding tbe fact that sbe struck him several times 
in the mouth with her knees. 



At Lingfield, England, American horses scored two vic- 
tories in the National Hunt Club races. The six year old 
Mack Briggs (Strathmore — Ortawin) woo the Cowden 
Steeplechase at two miles and Lord W. Beresford's three 
year old Manatee (8ir Modred — Mis Motley) won the Young- 
sters' Hurdle Rac?, two miles. 



Richard Croker, the Tammany leader, fell when about 
to mount a horse at bis country p'ace in England last week 
and his leg was broken. Foxball Keene, the well known 
American sportsman, met with an accident in England tbe 
same week. He was following the hounds, when his horse 
fell aod Mr. Keene's shoulder was dislocated. 



That the science of brerding is a mere lottery was well 
exemplified on Monday last when a five year old horse sired 
by the famous Salvator from the champion Fireczi was 
started in a race for non-winners in 1899 and 1900 and failed 
to finish inside tbe moaey. This animal is a handsome, well 
turned individual and looks a race horse all over, but for 
some unexplained reason is entirely devoid of speed or 
courage. 



The Washington Jockey Club bas announced that the 
Hunters' Champion Steeplechase, which created so much 
interest at the Bennings meeting last month, will be renewed 
for tbe autumn meeting of 1900 Tbe announcement is also 
made that a new event, tbe Spring Hunters' Steeplechase, 
for qualified hunters, to be ridden by members of bunts in 
Maryland, Virginia and tbe District of Columbia, will be 
opened. The event will be decided at the Bennings meet- 
ing next spring. 



Mike Hennessey rode the Duke of York to victory with 
the remunerative odds of 1<'0 to 1 about his chances; in his 
over anxiety to win, Hennessey bumped Sagden in the run 
through the stretch and after disposing of him, pinned Nance 
O'Neil on the rail, finally gaining the verdict by a short head. 
Phelan who bad tbe mount on Schreiber's mare promptly 
claimed a foui, which was allowed and Duke of York was 
set back to last position. 

Jcckey Buliman seems to have acquired an unhappy 
faculty of getting away from the post in last position of late. 
Many times during the current meeting at Tanforan Park 
the chances of hot favorites and other well backed choices 
have been ruined by the tactics employed by Buliman at the 
start Notably was this the case with Forte and Mocorito, 
both of which would unquestionably have been returned 
winners with an even break. 



To Barney Schreiber fell the honor of winning the 
first two yeir old race of 1900 with a filly of his own breed- 
irg by Balgowan from 8pozia. The filly, well ridden by 
Buliman, made her own pac<4 throughout and won easily, 
running the three eighths in 36J seconds It is to be hoped 
that Sofala will be more fortunate than the first two year old 
winner of 1899, which never succeeded in earning winning 
brackets after her first essay. 



The start in the two year old race on Saturday was one of 
Mr. Caldwell's best eflirts, the seven contestants breaking 
away in a perfect line, illustrating what kind of work can be 
done with the Gray starting machine. This exhibition was 
followed by one of the worst attend tsto starta field of horses 
ever seen on any track where the bunch were dispatched on 
the most straggling terms, fully one hundred yards separating 
the leader from tbe last one away. 



George Cochrane, the steeplechase j ickey, suffered a 
serious accider t recently at Aiken. 8. C, where be has been 
schooling his employers,' F. R. ard T. Hitchcock, jumpers 
While training a green jumper be fell with the horse and 
lay unconscious for ihree days. When he came to he was 
demented and it is doubtful if he will recover. Cochrane 
was one of the best of the cross country division riding on 
the Metropolitan tracks last year. 



The reports about Keenan's breakdown appear to have 
something in them, as the Poona correspondent of the Indian 
Sporting Times asserted positively in a wire to that paper 
recently that Keenan was suffering from laminitis. If this 
is correct and the horse is out of the Cup, it will rob the race 
of some of its interest, as many people were curious to see if 
adding the horse to the list of geldings after last year's Cup 
race had improved his propensity to run cunning. 



P. T. Tomlinson has recently refused an offer of $8,000 
for the three year old cilt The Conqueror, by Sir Dixon — 
Repeat. He was probably the best youngster in the West 
last season, but was retired early on account of a cracked 
hoof. He has entirely recovered from that handicap and has 
wintered splendidly. The colt is engaged in all the Western 
Derbies and other big events for his age and all aged division. 
W. M. Rogers offered $6000 for him just after he was retired 
last summer. 



Aileena ran a remarkable race in the mile last Monday, 
finishing second and forcing Wallens'ein out to the last 
ounce. This was a specially creditable performance as tbe 
mare was not worked for a week before the race owing to the 
fact that the Tanforan track is closed for workouts. 



The two year old half brother to Imp. which is to be cam- 
paigned with her next season bas been named Seip. The 
trials already given tbe colt have proved him a worthy rela- 
tive to this great mare, if he can only race up to them. He 
has been entered in several of (he big stakes. He is now at 
Chillicotbe, O , and the local enthusiasts there will have 
t'lieir money ready to back him whenever or wherever he 
starts. 



The annual meeting of the Jockey Club will be held in 
New York on Thursday, Januarv 18th, when tbe vacancies 
which will take place through the expiration of the terms of 
some of the stewards will he filled, and a general election of 
officers will take place. The reports of tbe doings of tbe 
Jockey Club will be submitted and read, and arrangements 
will be made for the prosecution of a vigorous policy during 
tbe coming racing season. The question of racing dates will 
be decided at a meeting to be called when it is possible to 
have all the stewards present. It is not at all likely that 
there will be any hitch, neither is it anticipated shat there 
will be any dissatisfaction expressed at the apportionment 
decided upon by the governing body of the turf. 



Pierre Lorillard has secured a stallion to succeed the 
dead Sensation at Rmcocas. The work of Democrat in Eng- 
land last season, when he proved himself the best and stur- 
diest two year old out, gave Sensation an immense prestige, 
and it was unfortunate he did not live to reproduce his suc- 
cess. The new stallion is of English breeding, being a big 
bay named Giganteum, by Ben d'Or, dam Tiger Lily, by 
Macaroni, a brother in blood to the famous Ormonde, grand- 
sire of Flving Fox, and a f nil brother to Martagon, a suc- 
cessful English sire. Mr. Lorillard tried to purchase Marta- 
gon, but he was not for Bale. Giganteum never raced, but 
has been successful in the stud. He arrived in New York a 
few days ago. and has been installed at Rancocas. 



An ordinance to prevent book making and to close the 
pool rooms bas been drawn up by tbe City Attorney of Sac- 
ramento and will probably be passed by the city trustees. It 
provides: "No person within the limits of the City of Sacra- 
mento, upon any trial or contest of skill, speed or power of 
endurance between horses, shall sell any pool or pools, or 
make any book, list or memorandum, for or on which money 
or other articles of value shall be received or entered up, 
listed or written." No pools can be sold for tbe purpose of 
sending the same to any Fair or race track enclosure, either 
within or without this State. Any person violating tbe or- 
dinance shall be guilty of u misdemeanor, and upon convic- 
tion thereof shall be fined not less than $50, nor more than 
$200, or by imprisonment in the City Prison not exceeding 
thirty days, or by both such fine and imprisonment. 

"Cobhim," writing from London, says ' Democrat will 
certainly start in the Derby this year if be is fit, and tbat 
there will probably be no protests against him because he is 
a gelding. It is noteworthy tbat only nine gf 1 lings have 
started in the long list of Derby renewals. This list com- 
prises Dorus in 1812, British Tar in 1844, The Old Fox in 
1849, Gholab Singh in 1851, Special License in l>-57, Roque- 
fort and Taraban in 1867, Curzon in 1895 and Ballyleck in 
1899. Of these only ■Jurzm finished 'In the moner,' he 
having been second to 8ir Visto. The difference between 
Democrat's case and those quoted, however, lies in the fact 
that all the above nine were entire colts when entered. 
Despite all ibis, I feel very confident that Democrat will be 
hailed the victor at Epsom on the eventful Wednesday if 
only be is good enough to carry the 'light blue, black cap' 
home in advance of his opponents." 

The Australians were a long ways ahead of us in adopting 
starting gates and numbering saddle cloths, but they are cer- 
tainly slow with their annunciators as tbe following from the 
Asian will show: "At the last Caulfie'd races in Australia a 
new invention by a Mr. Don Carr of Melbourne for display- 
ing the winner's number above the judge's box immediately 
after a race was successfully tried. A light framework is 
fixed on the roof of the judge's box, and directly the race is 
over the winner's name is placed on a sliding frame and run 
up, so that the result of tbe race is within the view of all on 
the stand almost immediately. The working of it is en- 
tirely under the judge's control, and it seems a decided im* 
provement on the old Bystem of running up the numbers on 
a separate frame three or four minutes sometimes after the 
hoi Hex have passed the box. Those short heads should lose 
half their effect on owners and backers if they are put out of 
their misery at once in tbe way allowed by this new dodge." 



A fierce war is going on over the sale of the historic old 
Lexington race course, the intensity of which was not under- 
stood until recently, when Manager Karris of the track stated 
that he would not permit trainers the use of the track and 
stables for $10 per month, much lers $2, which is the usual 
charge. When asked why he would not allow the trainers 
to use the track, he said: "I am under instructions from Mr. 
Greeb to keep the gates nailed up, and to allow no one to 
use it for any purpose. List summer I allowed horses racing 
at the Elks Fair to use the track, and made nearly $60 by 
doing so; and I also allowed the holding of several picnics on 
the grounds. When I came to settle with Mr Green he was 
indignant, and ordered me not to accept any more business 
of any kind. My salary bas been going on, and I am resid- 
ing in the clubhouse, but not a cant is being made out of the 
property:" It is learned that Mr. Green considers that the 
breeders have bsdly mistreated him. When they were in 
need be came to their rescue with $30,000 to assist them in 
keeping their association in operation. Now they will not 
pay him a reasonable price for tbe grounds. It is for this 
reason that he has decided to starve them out. Overton H. 
Chenult, one of the leading turfmen of Lexington, when 
asked regarding what the breeders proposed to do, said: "We 
need a track, and need it badly. Unless some satisfactory 
agreement can be made with Mr. Green we shall have to get 
together and build a track." It is learned that many of the 
breeders who have the means to carry on such work favor 
building a new track, and have already gone on record as 

\ saying they will not pay one penny toward the old track. 

~ Ferris says he conld fill every stall at the track if Mr. Green 
would permit him to rent them. 



24 



[January 13, 1900 



OCCIDENT STAKE OP 1902. 



Has Reoelved 04 Entries, the Largest List in 
Its History. 



Secretary Peter J. Shields 18 certainly entitled to great 
credit for the m 'goincent entry list received by him for the 
State Agricultural Society's Occident Stake for trotting foals 
of 1899 to be trotted in 1962. There are 94 entries to the 
stake, which is a greater number than have ever before been 
mide in its history, and the stake will be as he predicted, the 
most valuable Bince its inauguration. It is reasonably sure 
that $4000 will bs divided aooiog the winners of tie race 
which is a largei stake than harness horses have had an op- 
portunity to contest for in California for several years. The 
entry list is as follows : 

Juan Gallefi;o8 — 

Carita. s f by Direct r, ince— Bessie WilkeB. 
Ojaia, b f by Prince Airlie— Lindale. 
Wegrita, blk f by Direct Prince— Quien Sabe. 

D. K. Knight, Marysville — 

Cbes.nut filly by Lynmont— Molley. 
Baycoit by Lynmout-Elmorene. 
Bay colt by Altamont— Balance All. 
Baycoit by Walds'ein —Daisy. 

Thog. Smith, Yallejo— 

Gen. \Vashitigton, ch c by George Washington— Venus. 
John Lutgen, Alainada — 

Dewey, b c by Altamont— Oakville Maid. 
Alexander Brown, Walnut (irove — 

Bay fillv by Nushagak— Woodfl >wer. 

Brown colt by Nnsbagik— Adjie vV. 

Bay colt by Nushagak— Nosegay. 

Bay (illy by Prince Ansel— Chamois. 

B. I. Monrhead, Sauta Clara — 

Maggie N., cb t by Hauibletonian Wilkes— Anna Bslle. 
Jesse D. Carr, Salinas — 

Admiral D iv/ey, cn c by Boolle Jr— Isabelle. 
A. C. Stevens- 
El Dorado, b c by Falrose— Maud. 
Mrs. Thos. Coulter, Sacramento — 

Frau Kruger, br f by Zjmbro— Blanche. 
Oak wood Park Stock Farm — 

Bay colt by JameB Madison— Ituna. 

Bay filly by Chas. D rby — Pippa. 

B-iy colt by Chas. Derby— Economy. 

Black colt by Chas. Derby - Em p -ess. 

Brown fll y by Cbas. D.Tby— Coquette. 

Silvio Comisto — 

Montie, cb c by Monterey 2:09%— Hazel. 

W. F. Snyder- 
Brown c by Waldstein-Daughter of Grand Moor. 

James S. Taylor, Napa — 

Martha Washington, b f by Geo. Washington. 

D. S. Matthows— 

Princ e Elect, b c by Electus— Stella McC. 
Donatus, blk c, by Eiectus— Wbippadoni. 

C. A. Keefer— 

Amlet, b f by Arthur Wilkes-Amlet. 
J. 31. riackett, Kocklin — 

Don Z . b c by Stam B. 2:llK-I/>tta H. 
W. II. l.mn-uliii, Santa Rosa — 

McPnerson, be by McKinney— Eyaline. 
Mrs. S. V. Bargtow, San Jose — 

Jubilee, b c by Wilkes Direct-Nettie G. 
James \Y . Mini urn 

Edran, - c by Teberan-Edna W. 

Riymolita, - f, by Teheran— Romona. 

Isla, - f, by Ilderim— Perfection. 

Dr. A BE, McColluni- 

Brown filly by Dave Ryan 2:13— Rosle Lee. 
Harry K. Burke — 

Harry B . b c by Geo. Washington— May Girl. 
J. It IveiHon, Salinas— 

Ruble, b f by Altamont— Ruby. 

Prii.ce Rio, blk c by Alta Kio— Belle. 

I. L. Borden, San Francisco- 
La Belle Altamont. b f by Altamont— Alice Belle. 

C. A. Durfee, Oakland — 

Cuate, b c by McKinney 2:lHj— Miss Jessie 2:14. 

Get). W. Ford, Sauta Ana — 

Chestnntcjit by Neeruut— Bess. 

J. J. McGrath — 

Bellone, b f, by Falone— Happy Belli. 

Tuttle Bros , Kocklin— 

Moscow, br c by Z imbro— Belle Medium. 
Frank Bates, b c by Stam B— Grace C. 

J. Doran, Oakland — 

Oakland Maid, b f by McKinney— Lady C. 
H. P. Moore- 
Etta Wood, b f by Boxwood -Etta. 
Santa Roia Stock Farm — 

Brown colt by Bay Rose— Athenian. 

Brown colt by L. W Russell— Biscara. 

Black filly by L W. Russell— Flora Allen. 

Brown colt bv Diablo— Hazel Mc. 

Bay filly by Vallota— Mollv Allen. 

Chestnut colt by Sidney Dillon— Pansy. 

W. J. Dingee. Oakland— 

Fernwood, b c, by McKinney— Lucy Shaw. 
C. K. Harrington — 

Uarda, b f by Falrose— Virginia. 
Geo. H. Fox, Clements — 

- Brown colt by Silver Bow— Kitty Fox. 
C. M. Cline— 

Libby Zanos, b f by Zombro— Lizzie Monaco. 
I>. H. Todhunter, Sacramento — 

Zombrozette, t> f by Zombro— by Sliver Bow. 
Rancho Del Paso, Sacramento- 
Bay colt by Bay Bird— Hilda. 

Bay colt bv Knight -Alaskeua. 

Bav filly by Biy Bird - Rosemary. 

Chestnut colt by Kright— by Aatevo'o. 

Bav c It by Bar Bird-bv Albert W 

Bay filly by Knight— Young Lady Washington. 

Bav colt by Bay Mini- Violet. 

Bav colt bv Bay Bird— by Albert W. 

Chestnut filly by Knight— Charts. 

Chestnut filly by Kuinht— Honeysuckle. 

Bay colt by Bay Bird— by Albert W. 



Vendome JStock Farm, San Joae— 

The Masco', f by Iran Alto— Linda Oak. 
A. F. Hamilton- 
Bay colt by Meridian— Paulina. 
H. W. Meek, Haywardg— 

Bay filly by Welcome- Fennella. 

Bay tiny by Welcome— alienor. 

Bay filly by Welcome— Ed wina. 

Bay or brown fiily by Welcome— Hybla 
Palo Alto Stock Farm — 

Rosemoor, b c by Azmoor— Rosemont. 

Anselma. br f by Altivo— Anselma 

Wiioweua, br f by * ildnut -Rowena. 

Aliivosa, br f by Altivo— Mary Osborne. 

Nutwood Stock Farm, Irvington— 

Mixer, b c by Nutwood Wilkes -Lou G. 
Miss Georgie, br f by McKinuey-Georgie B. 

K. D. Fox- 
Bay colt by Silver Arrow -Pure Love. 

Rudolph Jordan Jr— 

My Emily, blk t by McKinney— Adelira Patti. 

A. T. Van De Vanter, Seattle, Wash- 
May Moat, br f by McKiuney— McMinnville Maid. 

F. D. McGregor, Santa Kosa— 
Bay filly by Cock Robin— Mabtl. 

F. L,. Duncan — 

Honolulu Maid, br f by Kentucky Baroa— Mignonette. 

8. H. Hoy, Winters— 

Edward, dn c by Bayswater Wilkes— Margueiite. 

Geo. T. Beckerg, Los Angeles — 
Zomola, b c by Zombro— Mineola. 

Fdward Pickett— 

Minnie Talmadge, br f by Knight— Hoodoo. 

Aptos Stock Farm — 

by Cupid 

bv Altivo 

Park Henghaw, Chlco — 



THIRD PAYMENTS. 

Third payments were made upon tho following entries in 
the 1900 Stanford 8take. 

Palo Alto Slock Farm's br c Exioueer by Boodle— E<presslve by Elec- 
tioneer. 

J D Carr's b f Babv Wilkes by Pacheco Wilkes— Nina B. 

C A Durfee's blk c by McKinney— Nona Y by Admiral. 

E P Heald's br c Tom Smith by McKinney— Daisy S by McDonald Chief- 

Oakwood Park Stock Farm's br f Bablola by Chas Derby — May by An- 

teeo; b g Lucky Way by Stein way— Katie G by Electioneer. 
W II Harris' b c Joe B by Toucbet— Queen of Knight. 
Ve dome Stock Farm's c Vendome by Irau Alto— Linda Oak. 
H L Frank's b c Ben Liebes by McKinney— Belle McGregor by Robert 

McUregor. 

La Siesta Ranch's b c by McKinney— Wanda. 

Park Itenshaw's b m Lelta C by McKinney--Gladys B; blk h General 

Forrest by McKinney— Orphan Girl. 
J B Iverson's br f Dagmar by McKinney— Stelnway Maid ; b I Princess 
by Eogeneer— Belle, by Kenlucky Prince. 

Third payments were made upon the following entries in 

the 1900 Occident Stake. 

T W Barstow's b I Our Lady by Wilkes Direct— Nellie Q. 
La Siesta Ranch's b c The Roman by McKinney — Wanda. 
Oakwood Stock Farm'8 b f Babiola by Chas Derby— May ; br t Lltka by 

Cbas Derby— Susie Mambrino: b f Nazoma by McKinney— Amazon ; 

br g Lucky Way by Stelnway- Katie O. 
Lawrence Slock Farm's b f Haz?l B by Messenger Almont— Magna Maid 

by Pilot Medium. 
Jas Campbell's b c R Z by Z imbro— Reica by Ferlo Clay. 
D E Knight's b f Kuiah Mac by McKinney— Bilanoe All; bl Frieda 8 

by Lvmoni— Elmorene. 
E P Heald's br c Tom Smith by McKinney- Daisy 8. 
U A Durfee's blk c by McKinney— Nona Y. 
C Z Hebert's br c by McKinney— Dolly by Mozart. 
Geo Y Bolloger's br c Boodle Boy by Boodle— Wapsie. 
T J Drals' blk c Guy McKinney ny McKinney— by Guy Wilkes. 
Vendome Stock Farm's c Vendome by Iran Alt)— Linda Oak by Guy 

Wilkes. 

Geo H Fox's b c by Silver Bow— Grace by Buccaneer; b f by Silver Bow 

— Kitly Fox by Pancoast. 
J B Iverson's b m Princess by Eugeneer— Belle by Kentucky Prince; br 

m Dagmar by McKinney — Stelnway Maid. 
Mrs S V Barstow's b I Belle Jackson by Wilkes Direct— Darkness. 
Palo Alto Stock Farm's b c Monbells by Mendocino 2: 19 ^—Beautiful 

Bells. 

SECOND PAYMENTS. 

Second payments were made upon the following entries in 
the Stanford Stake of 1901 : 

Jas C flin's b f Cuba, by Oro Wilkes— Mattle Menlo. 

R I Moorhead's s g Dexter Wilkes by HambletonlaTi Wilkes— Belle 

Donna— by Uladiator. 
D E Kulght's b c Waldo W, by Waldetein— Daisy ; brcChasH.by Lyn- 

mont— Elmorene. 
W H Lumsden's b f Fantell le, by Altamont— Daughter of Nutwood. 
PWLe'sbrl Fluey by Or Lee (by Fay Wilkes)— Fleety, by Dexter 

Prince. 

John O Kirkpatrick's b f Suz»nne, by McKinney — Flewey-Flewey. 
Thos S Manning's b c Commander Muckle by McKiuney— Cheerful by 
Larco. 

A M McCollum'sch I Jenny H, by Algona— Rose Lee, by Bob Lee. 

Vendome Mock Farm's b e Fay Temple, by Boodle— Laura R. by Elec. 
tloneer; b c Iran Dale, by Iran Alto— Avandale, by Antlnius;brf 
Elsie Downs, by Boodle-Linda Oak, by Ouy Wilkes. 

J B Iverson's b f Jessie K, by Patch wood— Susie K. 

Mrs E W Callendlne <fe Co's b f Lady Keating, by 8tam B— Abble Wood- 
nut, by Woodnut. 

Palo Alto Stock Farm's br b Orlanta, by Oro Wilkes-Atalanta, by The 
Moor; be Wesley, by Advertiser— Waxana, by General Benton. 

H 8 Hogoboom's cb c by Waldsteln— Kosie Gold, by (loldrose. 

J D Carr's b or br Matchless by Ecce— Flossie, by Cair's Mambrino. 

Alex Brown's b 1 by Nushagak — Franclsea; b r by Alfred— Woodflower 

W P Book's b c Gold Coin, by Zombro— Leonora. 

J Dor«n's b f Delia McCarty , by McKinney— Lady C. 

Robert I Orr's blk c Oro Guy, by Oro Wilkes— Roseate, by Ouy Wilkes. 

AG Gurnett's s c by St Nicholas— Lassie Jean. 

C A Durfee's b f Lady Elizabeth by McKinney— Allen, by Anteeo. 

A Owen's ch c Le Roy by Waldsteln— Zadie McOreg jr. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's b c by L W Russell — Palo Belle, by Palo Alio, 
blk f by L W Russell— Flora Allen, by Mambrino Wilkes; b f by 
L W Russell— Pansy, by I asslus M Clay Jr. : b c by Vallotta— Liselte 
byAbdallah Wilkes; br c by M< Kinney— Bye Bye. by Nutwood; br t 
by McKinney— Lily Stanley, by Whlppleton; b c by Vallotta— Genie 
by General Benton, 

Oakwood Park stock Farm's oik 1 La Bonlta, by Cbas Derby— Coquette; 
brc by Cbas Derby— Chipper Simmons; brc by Chas Derby— Plppa; 
b f B Sharp, by Stelnway— Tone. 



G Wempe's blk c by McKinney —Lady Director. 

Geo W Ford's b c by Neernut— Florence C. ; b f by Neernut— Bess. 

W Masliu's b t Rosalind, by Falrose— Nora. S, by Sable Wilkes. 

Van de Vanter Stock Farm's blk c Chief Seattle by Freddie C (by 

Direct)— Daughter of Hamdeli;b f Lady Guy by Guycesca— Daughter 

of Tom V. 

Second payments were ma e upon the following entries in 
the 1901 Occident Stake: 

Oakwuod Park stock Farm's brc by Charles Derby— Chipper Simmons; 
blk f La Bunita by Charles D*rby— Coquette ; br c by Charles Derby— 
Plppa. 

Lawrence Stock Farm's — f Mahal 8 by Messenger Almont— Magna 
Mai I by Pilot Medium. 

DE Knight's b c Chas H by Lynmont— Elmorene; b c Waldo H by 
Waidsiein— Palsy. 

Juan Gallegos'brc Mateo by Princ 1 Airlie— Sable by The Moor. 

D s Mathews' b t Miss Rowene by Taric— Hattie W by Alaska. 

Al x Brown's b f by Nushogak — Franclsea; b f by Alfred — Woodflower 

Palo Alto Slock Farm's be Col Edwards by Dexter Prince— I oral by- 
Electioneer; b c Dobbel by Wildnut— Helena by Electioneer. 

Peter E Jesseu's b f Little Eva by Prince Airlie— Kate Arthurton. 

Thos K Manning's be Comma ider Muckle by McKinney— Cheerful by 
Larco. 

C A Owen's ch c Lee Roy by Waldsteln -Sadli McSregor by Robert 
McOregor. 

Mrs E W Callendlne's b f Lady Keating by Stam B— Abhie Woodnut. 
A M McCollum'sch f Jenny H by Algona— Rose Lee by Bob Lee. 
W H Coleman's b f Znnbretta by Z jmbro— Fortune. 
John C Kirkpatrick's br f Suzanne by McKinney— Ftewey Flewey by 

Son of Sidney. 
Dr J P Dunn's b f by McKinney— Fonlan ta by Antevolo. 
J B Iverson's br f Jessie K by Patchwo. id— Susie K. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's b c by L W Russell— Palo Belle by Palo Alto ; 
blk f by L W Russell — Flora Allen by Mambrino Wilkes; b c by 
Vallotta— Lisette by Abdaliah Wilkes; b f Dy L W Russell— Pansy 
by Cassius M Clay Jr; brc by McKinney— Bye Bye by Nutwood ; br f 
by McKinney— Lily Stanley; be by Vallotta— Uenlc by Uen'l Ben- 
ton; ch f by Sld. ey Dillon -Lou Milton bv Milton Medium. 

8 V Barstow's b f Aurelia B by Wilkes Direct— Nettle G by Anteeo. 

CZ Hebert's brc by McKinney— Dolly by Mozart. 

O Wempe's blk c Joe Kinney by McKinney— Lady Director. 

J C Wlihoit'8 b f Lavlna W by Zombro— Concha by A W Richmond. 

J Doran's b f Delia McCarthy by McKinney— Lady O. 

Frank L Barstow's b c Uncle Dewey by Wilkes D rect— Camma. 

Vendome Stock Farm's be Irandale by Iran Alto— Avendale by An- 
tlnous; b c Fay Temple by Boodle— Laura R by Electioneer; br f 
Elsie Downs by Boodle— Lynda Oaks by Ouy Wilkes. 

C A Durfee't blk t Bessie Mc by McKlnuey— Rose McK nney. 

J D Carr's br c Matchless by Ecce— I lossie by Carr's Mambrino. 

W H Lumsden's bf Fantallne by Altamont— by Nutwood. 

Thos Smith's b f Jallena by Mambrino Chief Jr- Daisy S. 

Wm P Book's b c Oold Coin by Z >mbro— Leonora 

Geo H Fox's b t by Silver Bow— Vesper; be by Silver Bow— Grace. 

A G Gurnett's 8 c by St Nicholas— Lassie Jean. 

R Noble's b f by Diablo lora by Ira. 



State Fair Futurity Stakes. 



Second payments on the State Fair Futurity of 1901, and 
fourth payment on the same stake for 1900, were due on 
January 1st this year. 

Second payments were made on the following entries in 
the Futurity Stake of 1901: 

Burns 4 Waterhonse's b f by imp Midlothian— Decoy Duck by Long- 
fellow; br 1 by Torso— Happy Maiden; b f by Altamax— Sweet 
Faverdale. 

Burllngame Stock Farm's br f Musiqae by Magaet— Muster by Flood. 

J Harvey's — by Artillery— Seraphim by Emperor of Norfolk. 

Elmwood Farm's - - bv imp Brutus -Molly H by Wlldidle; - - by imp 
Brutus— Leda by Nathan Coombs; - - by imp Brutua— Nabette by 
Nathan Coombi; — by Tiger— Roma by Imp Brutus; - - by Tiger- 
Installation by imp Brutus. 

La Siesta Ranch's b or br c Wauderlng Boy by imp Brutus— Wander- 
lug Nun of Argyle by Argyle. 

Mullenney * Fox's - - Tors}— City Girl by Imp Trade Wind. 

A T Rost,' br f Sue Robinson by Imp Artillery— Keepsake by Flood. 

E D McSweene>'ac f Calatina by Rey el Santa Aulta— Catallne by 
Enquirer. 

Geo K Rider's blk f by True Brit in — Duera by Sir Modred. 

John Mackey's foal of Bassetlaw— Angellque by Darebln; foal of Cav- 
alier—Empress of Norfolk by Emperor of Norfolk; foal of Water- 
cress— Helen Scratch by Scratch; foal of Star Ruby— Hluda Dwyer 
by Reform. 

Fourth p lyments were made upon the following entries in 
t he Fulurity Stake of 1900. 

Burns A Waterhouse's b f Madrioa by Imp Midlothian— Paloma by The 
Drummer; b c David S by imp Mldlotblan-Talleuda by Enquirer; 
bf Sea Bass by Artillery— Picnic by Mr Pickwick; b f Spain War by 
Artillery— Sweet Rose; be Dunfree by Dunconbe— Free Love by 
Luke Blackburn, 

J Anthony's br c Carlocini by St Carlo— Franchise by Hindoo 

E D McSweeney's br c by Vassal— Dutch Dancer. 

Cbas S Fair's Castoff by Yo El Rey— Princess by Chevlo*. 

Elmwood Farm's b c by imp Brutus— Leda by Nathan Combs; ch c by 
imp Brutus— Initiation bv Inauguration; b c by imp Brutus— Ledalia 
by Argyle. 

I P Dlggs' b f Lilly Digjs by R»d Iron— Lilly Wright by California. 

John Mackey's b f by St Andrew— Alameda, by Springbok ; b c by Can- 
dlemas— Helen Scratch oy Scratch ; b f by Sr*Andrew— Hot Spring 
by Rebel; b c by St Andrew— Rlcardo by Stratford. 



VETERINARY DEPATRMENT. 

CONDUCTED BY 
WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C.V.C.. F. E. V. M. S. 
Subscribers to this paper can have advlcn througb these columns In 
all cases of Blck or Injured horses, catlle or dogs by seudlng a plain 
deacriptton of the case Applicants will send their name and address 
that they may be identified. 



Lice on Horses 



VALLrJO, Dec. 26, 1899. 

Breeder and Sportsman — Will you give me in your 
next issue a receipt for the cure of lice on a horse. F. W. 
Perkins, ValHjo, Cal. 

Ans. — First wash the skin with soap and warm water, and 
then rub some tobacco water well in. If the hair be very 
long, it is well to clip the horse before washing. 



" I find them the best preparation for 
colds, coughs and asthma." — MB8. S. A. 
Watson, Temperance Lecturer. 

DDflllf il'C Bronchial 
D nil If H O Troches 

OF BOSTON 

Sold in boxes only— Avoid imitations. 



January 13, 1900] 




Coming Events. 



BENCH SHOWS. 

Feb. 20— 23— Westminster KeDuel Club. 24th annual show. New 
York. James Mortimer, sup't. 

FIELD TRIALS. 

Kentucky Field Trial Association. Inaugural trials 

Ky. H. D. Newcomb. sec'y. 

South Carolina Game Protective and Field Trial Associa- 
tion. Ioaugujal tiials B. C. W. O. Jeffords, sec'y. 

Jan. 22, 19UO— United States Field Trials Club. West Point, Miss. 
W. B Stafford, sec'y. . , , .... 

Champion Field Trials Association's annual trials. Wes 

Point, Miss. (Following U. 8. Trials). W. B Stafford, sec'y. 

Jan 22, 1900— Pacific Coast Field Trials. 17th annual trials 
Bakersfield. J. E. de Ruyter, sec'y. 

Feb. 5, 1900— Alabama Field Trials Club. 4th annual trials. Green- 
ville. T. H. Spencer, sec'y. 

Feb. — , 19 0-Texas Meld Trial Club. 4th annual trials. 

Tex, G. A. Chabot, sec'y-treas. 

DOINGS IN DOQDOM. 



The St. Bernard Club will meet on Monday evening. 



The bench show of the 8an Francisco Kennel Club will be 
held on or about the first week in May. 



A comber of local fanciers are urgently advocating an A. 
K. C. circuit, taking in San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, 
Stockton and Sacramento. This would create a boom in 
kennel circles. 



Professor's Lad, a grand field pointer, owned by C. M. 
Osborn, died recently. He was by Professor out of Drab and 
was a remarkably intelligent and well trained dog. Most dogs 
are broken to whistle, Lad only recognized the motion of his 
master's hand, whi^h he understood to perfection. 



Alec Truman, heretofore known as an Irish setter fancier 
with a strong liking for pointers,has become the owner of the 
English setter Peach Nugget (Valieote— Peach Mark). It is 
probable that Don of Blithe, one of Mr. Truman's pointers 
in charge of Henry Betten, will not start in tbe trials. 



W. H. Williams' well known bench winning Irish water 
spaniel bitch Belle Marsh was accidentally snot during a 
hunt on the marsh near Sears Point last 8unday — she lost one 
of her ears; this disfigurement will tell against her on the 
bench but luckily will not militate against her breeding, she 
is too good a dog for tbe lovers of the breed to lose. 



Stockdale Kennels at Bakersfield have some very promis- 
ing pointer puppies that are coming on finely under Man- 
ager Dodge's training. Two more litters are shortly ex- 
pected. The recent breedine of Sam's Bow with JiDgo's 
Bagpipe and Florida to Cuba of Kenwood leads to the most 
sanguine expectations for a crop of future Derby winners. 



According to the Patent Record, an automatic nursery 
maid for orphan dogs is one of the latest ideas that have been 
presented to the Patent Office. A commonplace soap box is 
substituted for the poppy's mother by introducing a sheep- 
skin covered cylinder supporting a series of rubber nipples. 
These nipples connect by tubes with an inner cylinder con- 
taining milk, and the space between the inner and outer 
cylinders is filled with warm water. 



H. G. Hemmelright reports the loss on December 26th 
last, bv Powbattan Kennels of an excellent young fox terrier 
bitch Powbattan Sweetheart (Claudian — Warren Tattle) A 
prominent fancier, the best informed fox terrier authority on 
the Coast, pronounced the youogster one of tbe most promis- 
ing bitches out here, she being almost a perfect ima?e of 
Claudian. Mr. Hemmelright brought Tattle from the East 
in whelp, he has been very unfortunate with the litter losing 
all of them, tbe last survivor being Sweetheart, who sue- 
combed to an attack of inflammation of the bowels. 



The Portland Kennel Club was organized in Portland, Or- 
on Wednesday evening, Tbe officers of the new kennel or 
ganization are: W. F. Burrell, President; F. W. Holman, 
Vice President; R. T. Barnes, Treasurer; who are also 
directors, the other members of the B >»rd of Directors being 
T. J. Tiedeman, William Peasleeand Dr. F. Cautnoro. The 
club will make application for membership in toe Pacific 
Kennel League. A bench show in March is contemplated, 
this will enable Portland fanciers to make entries in the cir- 
cuit of shows to be held in tbe principal citied of the north- 
west this spring. 



On Monday, January 22d, the seventh annual trials of the 
Pacific Coast Field Trials Club will commence near Bakers- 
field The selection of Mr. Thomas Johnson of Winnipeg, 
Manitoba, as judge is one that is pleasing indeed to those who 
will attend the meeting. Messrs Dodge, Lucas, Coutts and 
Betten have been hard at work putting the finishing touches 
to their dogs. Some good ones will be in the four stakes to 
he run off — Tacoma, C. B. Dwyer's blue belton English setter 
dog is looked upon as a coming crack. Dr. Wilson, of Elko, 
Nevada, is already at Bakersfield with three excellent setters. 
This has been a hard year at Bakersfield to train dogs, birds 
have been scarce and cover lacking, consequently tbe few 
birds found get into trees and take lone Sights, as a result tbe 
does will be somewhat short on bird work. The plentiful 
supply of rain recently, however, should cause tbe quail to 
come down into the valleys and also produce to a great ex- 
tent a growth of suitable cover. Judging from the reticence 
and illv concealed enthusiasm displayed by several of the 
club members lately the Members and Subscription Stakes 
promiee to be unusually interesting. 



Tbe dachshund has been the subject of many pens and 
pencils, and outside of technical matter by the fancy, gener- 
ally ihe space devoted to the Teutonic yard of dog has been 
devoted to humor and frivolity. It can now be conceded, 
however, that the Cleveland Plain Dealer has "gilded the 
lily" in a very artistic manner. This is what a boy wrote 
about the dachshund: "The docksbound is a dorg notwith- 
8tandin' appeerencis. He has fore leg?, two in front an' two 
behind, an' they ain't on epeekin' terms. I wunst made a 
dockshouod out of a cowcumber an' fore matchia, an' it 
lookt as nscheral as life. Dockshounds is farely intelligent 
considerin' thare shaip Thare brains bein' so far away 
frum thare tales it bothers them sum to wag the lattur. I 
wunst noo a doc',;shourd who wuz too impashunt to wate till 
he cood signal the hole length of bis boddy when he wanted 
to wag his tale, so he maid it up with his tale thet when he 
wanted it to wag he would shake his rite ear, an' when tbe 
tale seen it shake it wood wag. But as fer me, gimme a bull 
pup with a peddygree.'' 



Rating of the A . O. K. Shows ot 1899 




Loafln' Time. 



Some folks air allers babbliu' erbaout the lovely spring; 
Haow nice to watch the posies bloom, 'n' hear the robins sing. 
Naow fur them poetry fellers, seen twaddle may be true, 
But haow c'n I 'njoy it with all mv work to dew? 
There's plowin' 'n' there's plantin' 'n' fixin' up the fence, 
'N' 'fore one thing Is skerselv done another's to commence. 
I don't like summer, neither. It gits so pesky hot. 
The hayfleld s purty healthy, but 'taint no picnic spot! 



The following list is in compliance with the rules of the 
American Kennel Club regarding the publication of the 
rating of shows of the past year in the issue of The Gazette 
for December. The next shows given by any of the under' 
mentioned clubs will have a minimum rating, in accordance 
with this list. 

It will be seen that the San Francisco bench show is 
given a rating equal to tbe New York show. The scale of 
points for shows on the Pacific Coast being: 400 dogs or over, 
5 points; 250 dogs and under 400, 3 points, under 250 dogs, 
1 point. 

Dogs Min. 
Entsred. Rating. 



American Pet Dog Club 666 3 

Baltimore K A 310 2 

Butterfly Assd 316 2 

Cincinnati D O P A 493 2 

PauburyAgSoc 282 2 

Luquesne K C 617 3 

Joliet K C 132 1 

Mascoutah K C 585 3 

Milwaukee K A 162 1 

New England K C 668 3 

Northwestern K C 3J9 2 

Philadelphia I) S A 479 2 

Rhode Islaud K C 308 2 

Rhode Island Slate Fair 282 2 

San Francisoo K C 437 5 

St Louis K C 528 3 

Texas K C 432 2 

Vermont K C 96 1 

Westminster K C 1526 5 



The Use of Dogs in War. 

The use of dogs in war dates back to the Greeks and 
Romans, but the modern idea of training them for special 
military service was born in 188G in Germany, and for the 
past ten or twelve years each battalion of German jagers has 
had eight or ten dogs assigned to it for this traiqing. The 
two or three dogs thus falling to each company are placed 
under the care of a non commissioned officer and two men, 
and each regiment has an officer detailed to superintend their 
instruction. 

The dog is to be used for various special duties, such as the 
service of information and security or scouting, on marches 
and reconnoismnces and in patrols, sentinel duty with the 
outposts, as messengers on both these duties, as carriers of 
supplies and ammunition on the battlefield, and to hunt up 
the wounded after battle. 

To test the results thus far obtained, a number of dogs be- 
longing to various regiments were assembled at OjIs in 
Prussian Silesia last July for trial. There were sixteen dogs 
in all, six of them under two ye§rs old. They were tried 
on the following points: Conduct as watch dog, return from 
patrol, following master by scent alone, and lying down. The 
first point was tested by placing the dog with his master at 
an outpost giving only a limited view and then causing two 
jagers (in enemy's uniform) to appioach under cover from a 
point about 400 yards distant. The second and third points 
were tested by sending four dogs at one time from an out- 
post (or patrol) to four different sentinels, then back again to 
tbe outpost (or patrol), back again to the sentinel, and once 
more to the outpost (or patrol) the latter having meanwhile 
changed its position. 

The various points were given values, and one of the dogs 
received 96 out of a possible 100 The dogs were of different 
breeds and crosses, but the best were collies and shepherd 
dogs. The average rate of travel of the dogs as messengers 
was about 9 ' miles an hour. 

Much interest is taken in this subject in other armies be- 
sides that of Germany, and, when once the best breed is de- 
termined, dogs may be specially bred for military service and 
a considerable number utilized in the armies. 



Kennel itegistry. 



Visits, Sales, Whelps and Names Claimed published In thli column 
free of charge. Please use tbe following form : 
VI9IT8. 

Mrs. Williams' red cocker spaniel bitch Nancy ( 

) to Maj J. L. Rathbone's black cocker Bob (Bob — 

Bess) October 30, 1899. 

Jos. W. Salz's Irish water spaLiel bitch Biddy Magee to 
G. H. Williams' Champion Dan Maloney (Musha — Biddy 
Malone) January 8, 1000. 

Stockdale Kennels' (Bakersfield) pointer bitch Jingo's 
Bagpipe (Jingo — Pontotoc Belle) to same owners' Sam's Bow 
(Plain Sam—Dolly Dee II) December 4, 1899. 

Stockdale Kennels' (Bakersfield) pointer bitch Florida 

( ) to same owners' Cuba of Kenwood (Glenbeigh 

Jr- Dodge's Stella) January 7, 1900. 

8ALE3. 

Redwood Cocker Kennels sold tbe black cocker spaniel 
bitch puppy Powhtttan Lou (Ch. Havoc — La Paloma) to 
Powhattan Kennels, December 23, 1899. 



The time o' year I favor most is them sunshiny days. 
Along in fall, when everything is In a purty haze, 
N' all tbe trees, tricked ont in gray, in yallcr 'n' in red, 
Look like some grand old army, with all its banners spread. 
The nights air some'at frosty— a feller 9leeps good, tho'. 
'N' 'tore his breaktust goes 'n' git9 a pickerel er so. 

I don't do much of any work, 'xceptin' these few chores: 

I like to fish 'n' hunt 'n' smoke, 'n' loaf eraonnd out doors. 

Jane sez, "You're dretful lazyl" I tell her, "That ain't so;" 

I'm takin' my vacation; I'm citylied, y' knowl 

Old Natur's got her work done up withaout no great mishap; 

She's feelln' sorter drowsy naow, before her winter's nap; 

'N' that's Jest haow I feel myelf; been slavin' all the year; 

"But naow," sez I, "I've quit— Hooray I my loafln' time is here!" 

—Ernest Neal Lyon, iu Truth. 



The Los Angeles Pigeon Shooting Episode. 

The individuals representing the 8. P. C. A. of Los 
Angeles have succeeded, after a great deal of bluff and 
bluster in making juBt an ordinary small anthill out of the 
mountain of feathers they attacked at the recent shooting 
tournament. This particular interference with the affairs of 
sportsmen and gentlemen being prompted by a code of ethics 
which had its musty origin during the gruesome days of 
puritanical intolerance when that God-fearing and saintly 
man Cotton Mather used to rub his hands in holy glee 
whilst alleged witches were gibbeted and drowned, or would 
frown ominously at the unlucky Quaker who was rewarded 
for staying with his religious convictions by having a hole 
burned through his tongue, and with a common ordinary 
poker at that. These fanatical beings who looked after the 
betterment of body and soul of those who dared to do and 
think differently from them were finally temporized so that 
in later days nothing more sericus than fio.es and imprison 
ment were imposed. Possibly the effects of a pumpkin pie 
and sweet cider diet on succeeding generations had some- 
thing to do with it, this is a reasonable inference when it is 
known that in certain parts of the East, largely represented 
by the Los Angeles contingent, a man who kissed his wife in 
public, anyone playing a jewsharp, or in comparatively re- 
cent days smoked on tbe streets (in Boston, for instance) was 
haled before a magistrate by the only too willing constable 
and mulcted by the champions of the outraged law who after- 
wards took their allotted rakeoff in the shape of fees. We 
have been in a populous city of the East, where the really 
truly good people ruled, and noticed among other excellent 
regulations that the street railway corporations were com- 
pelled to take the bells off the horses on Sundays I The un- 
holy noise was ntopped but tbe risk to human life was greatly 
increased, this cut no figure with the "praise God bare 
bones" element. 

The humane society (?) people desired a separate arrest for 
each individual and for every bird shot during the tourna- 
ment and all this for the purpose of testing the law I The 
Sheriff, however, had too much sense to assist in such un- 
called for proceedings. Seventeen arrests were made and 
the shooters were brought before Justice James in the town- 
ihip court on the 2d inst. The attorneys for the society 
drew one complaint against A. W Bruner and desired that 
the court should hold all the defendants on general princi- 
ples under that one complaint. This was refused, the court 
insisting that the complaints be filed against the accused. 
The Bruner case came up last Saturday when the original 
complaint filed was withdrawn by reason of a fatal error and 
a new one filed. Tbe first complaint alleged the offense to 
have been committed in the city, which would necessarily 
throw the case into the city courts, they having exclusive 
jurisdiction of misdemeanor caseB. The amended complaint 
alleges the offense to have been committed outside tbe city 
limits, and in such case the township justice acquires juris- 
diction. 

On the 6.h inst. three additional complaints were filed: 
Against S. R. Smith, E. Vaughan and M Chick, the other 
cases were dismissed. The hearing was set for last Saturday 
but was continued for one week, until to-day. The matter 
of evidence is inconsequential, the essential facts not being 
denied. The whole matter turns upon the construction 
placed upon tbe law, and this phase will be threshed out 
when t e issues are raised by demurrer. 

Tbe gun club members have tbe moral support and en- 
couragement of the leading citizens and business men of the 
city; it is a fact worthy of notice that their counsel, who are 
among the most prominent gentlemen at the Bar in this 
State, have volunteered their services gratuitously. 

For tbe edification of tbe S. P. C. A. (society for the 
propagation of crass assininity) and also in response to num- 
erous inquiries from trap shooters among our readers, we 
submit some interesting legal opinions that were written by 
learned jurists and which are the leading authorities in cases 
of the kind: 

la the case of the State of Missouri vs. A. H. Bogardus 
4 Mo. Appeals p. 215, tbe judgment of the St. Louis Court 



26 



January 13, 1900 



of Criminal Correction was reversed and the complaint dis- 
missed. Judge Hayden, on June 12, 1877, in delivering the 
following opinion, all the judges concurring, said io substance. 

••The object ot the act is to prevent unn<ces«ary suffering to anlma's" 
Human beings are not included under this expression, but with this 
exception the act. in Its terms, is broad enough to cover all crealu-es. 
It is not so material, however, to Inquire how low In the order of cre_ 
atlon the subjects o. this act extend, as It Is to ask what is needles,, 
mutilation In killing, within the meaning ot the act. All needs are 
comparailve. The Mesh of animals Is not necessao for the subsistence 
ot man, at If ast In this country, and by some people it is not so used. 
Yet It would not be denied that the killing ot oxen for tood Is lawfu . 
Fish are not necessary to any one, nor are various wild animals which 
are killed and sold In the market- yet their capture and killing are 
regulated by law. The words • needlessly and unnecessarily must 
have a rkasonablb, not an absolute an 1 literal, meaning attached to 
them As It would not be claimed that the angler wUo catches Ah tor 
pastime, and neither sells nor eats them when caught, Is wlihlu the 
prohibition o» the law, so the marksman who, as an exercise or skill 
or as a diversion to himself or to others, (hoots pigeons, either from a 
trap or as they tly in the woods, does not violate the essential ohjerta 
of the act. When the prevention ot cruelty and suffering is concerned' 
there is plalolv a difference between Instantaneous and lingering cealh. 
The former Is generally, If not always, painless. Yet, In favor ot those 
sports which are considered healthful recreations, and exercises tending 
to promote stre gth, bodily agility, and courage, the pain which comes 
from a lingering death In the lower animals is often disregarded in the 
customs and laws of humane and highly civilized peoples In England 
an actol Parliament has been passed to rest. let vivisection, a practice 
which has high scientific ends. Yet f.x-huuting. which Is a cruel 
pastime, would no doubt be upheld by the common law. 

"It is certainly the policy of every government to encourage those 
recreations which serve as manly exercises, and yet do not n. cessarlly 
lead to protracted pain in ihe lower animals. The efficiency of the ser_ 
vices which the citizen Is called upon to .ender to the State, in exlgen 
cles, may largely depend upon the qualities acquired In manly sports 
and from some of the most attractive or these a certain amount of in- 
jury to dumb animals seems Inseparable, 

"In the present case there was no mutilation, or anything approaclnug 
to it. The birds were killed In a more humane way than by wringing 
their necks.wnlchisan ordinary me bod of destroying life In pigeons, 
when they are killed merely with a view to tbelr being eaten. We are 
of opinion that in the present case there was no violation of the act." 

On motion for a re hearing: In interpreting a legislative 
act, the judicial question wae— What application did the 
Legislature intend the words UBed to have? 

The re-hearing was overruled, the opinion, concurred in 
by the court, being rendered by Lewis, P. J , who said: 

"The universal love of so-called 'sports' which Involve the destruction 
of animal life cannot now be Ignored Id a search after the legislative 
meaning In the act before ns. Such diversions are not always resorted 
to for the needs of human sustenance. Y.t tbey are not considered 
'needless' for man's enj lyment of his legliimate dominion over the brute 
creation. The Individual who finds a healthful recreation in gunning or 
fishing can hardly be told that this must not be gained at the expose of 
his dumo subjects. The plea for life which he might hear, if the gift c* 
speech were not denied, would have little weight against even line 
momentary triumphs of the marksman who brings dowothegame. It 
may be that the day will cime when sentiments ot mercy and humanity 
shall be so far advanced, that the man who cao s> estimate a fleeting 
satisfaction above a lite, however lowly, will be regarded as selfish and 
cruel. But no such feeling p-evalls to-day. Nor can any Bucb be sup- 
posed as a basis for the Interpretailon of a legislative enactment. It 
could never be the pn'icy of good government to suppress Innocent 
manly exe-clie, which tend to promote physical superiority or to stimu- 
late the courage and the consciousness of individual po*er, which, in 
limes of public peril, so often prove the only means of safety." 

"Ad actsuj'i as this, identified in general feat ir;s wiih popular diver- 
sions whlcb, however, indifferent to lie value of bru e life, have never 
been held 'needless' for man's lawlul delecta Ion, could not have been 
within the legislative contemplation when.thlsindefiulte prohibition was 
made a law." 

The following cise is from the records of the Qiarler Ses- 
sion Court of Allegheny county, Pa , 1892, and was quite an 
important one, being the Commonwealth vs. Denny et al. 
The defendants were acquitted. The judge's charge was lb 
follows : 

"Gentlemen: Each of these defendants is separately lnnlc ed tor 
crulty to animals, In that he did unlawfully and wantonly shoot, wounl, 
abuse and Ill-treat one plg-on each, belonging to said J. O'H. Denny and 
E. H McWhorter. This was on the 21st day of April last. The pigeon 
shooting was out Id the Eighteenth or Nineteeulh Ward of this city. In 
the rural part ot the city. The case Is founded on the Act of Assembly 
passed In 1869, which I do not think very greatly differs from the one of 
1860, that 'Any person who shall within t lis commonwealth, waDtonly 
or cruelly Ill-treat, overload, beat or otherwise abuse any animal, shall be 
guilty of a misdemeanor.' It Is a statute law providing against evils 
that are supposed to exist. A rule in the Interpretation if statutes, and 
an o d one, w 11 established, is that in order to determine what a statute 
means you must ku 'W what the law was prior to the passage of the 
statute, and then see what evil was to be cured Our common law Is 
modified by the statute law very largely. There is a common la* In re- 
gard to animals an 1 their treatment by man that Is very old, and It Is of 
record in one of she oldest books we have, an 1 one ot the best law t> i ks 
thut we have. It was promulgated at the Garden of E len to Adam and 
Eve: "God blessed tbem.and Ood said uutothem, Be fruitful and mul Iply 
and replenish the earth, and sub lue It, and have dominion over the flab 
of the sea, over the fowl ol the air, and over every living thing that 
moves upon the earth.' 

"There are passages of the same general Import that have been govern- 
ing mankind ever since. The fish of the sea and the fowl J the air and 
the beasts ot the earth are for man, ra her than man for the oeasts. 
They are to be used fjr his sustenance, t > aid him, tor his comfort and 
his pleasure. Now In using them he must not unnecessarily cruelly 
treat them. The act of Assembly Is Intended to prevent cruel men and 
women from un >e:essarlly and want oily causing pain, where It Is not 
necessary In the using of animals tor legitimate purposes. 

"These defendants are sportsmen belooging, as I unders and. to an 
association; and at this particular lime tbey were shooting, as a test of 
skill, to see who could kill the most birds, each having 60 shots at SO 
birds. That was a legitimate, lawful use of the birds. The pigeons 
were "put In a trap one at a time, and let out, and tber would shoot 
them on the wing, if there were need of au authority, and I do no ( 
think it ought even I) have required one, the ^prene Court has de- 
cided that that Is a legitimate use of pigeons; Ibat It Is not cruel to 
shoot them f ir sport or as a test of skill. The Commonwealth concedes 
that the defendants cannot be convicted simply because they shot the 
pigeons In this way for this purpose, but alleges that they were guilty 
Of cruelty In this case because certain birds, or a bird shot by each of 
these defendants separately, did not fall before it got beyond the limits 
ot th lr bounds ot 50 or 60 yds away, and that it was cruelty not to 
have it brought in at once and killed. The defendants a leg., on the 
other baud, that It was done, and that every reasonable arrangement 
was made for gelling the wounded birds and killing them, and ttey even 
killed some birds that tbey could not tell whether they were wounded 
or not, to a certainty. The birds were brought In and were Intended 
to be used for food. But assuming for the purposes of this case iha 



Mr. O'Brien's Inferences were all correct, that there was no such pro. 
vision as the defendants testified to, I am disposed to think, and so 
instruct you, that It is not the cruelty that Is Intended In the act of 
Assembly, for tbem to neglect to kill these birds that had escaped. I 
know that a great many humanitarians, and especially professional 
humanitarians, legard It as their duty to kill a wounded animal at 
once. If a horse gets a leg bioken, it Is to have no chance i f being 
cured, but must be shot; and It a bird Is wounded It must be killed 
Immediately! I have never yet heard any well-authenticated case of a 
man or aisociallon having c jmmuuicatloD with horses or pigeons or 
chickens to know whether or not they desire to be shot at ooce: aod 
I find myself often wjnderlng when I see a?ciunls ol these summary 
proceellngs, and the m inner In which, as a matter of humanity, anl. 
nials are put out of the way when lujured, whether the. horse could 
not sit in judgment over a wounded or crippled mao, or an old man 
that has bee ma luflrm and Incapacitated from dolog anything and 
taking care of himself, and decide that be should be killed '. I am 
rather Inclined to think that, when a blrl has gotten away a reason- 
able distance. It Is not necessary to assume that It will, as a matter o' 
course die, and It is a great relief to It and a great advantage to it and 
a piece of humanity tn at ouce put it out of Its pain. We do not know 
whether a wounded blr l wauts to be put outot its pain and existence 
or not I do not think It does, but I do not know; neither do these 
gentlemen know. The malter^depends a great deal on sentimentality 
on whim, on education, and on what we have been accustomed to. 

"I Instruct you, genlleme I, that your verdict In each ot these cases 
should be fir the defendants. It Is a misdemeanor, and you have the 
right to say wb> shal pay the osts. It Is your duiytosay wnoshal 1 
pay the costs, an 1 you will determloe whether the county, the prosecuto, 
or the defendants shall piy them, or the prosecutor and defendants, and 
In what propn-tlon. I might suggest this to you, that In this case, which 
has beau brought as a test case, I hive no dount the prosecutor and those 
around him, aud those whom he represents, hooeatiy think that this Is 
cruelty. I do not. I d>not think you would.lt I were to submit the 
matter to you : but it was brought as a test case and upon good motives, 
and I suggest to you that the costs should not be put on the prosecutor ; 
aud I do not think they ought t ) be put on the defendants, because Ihey 
have not been guilty f anything that was unusual or anything that has 
been declare ! a crime, and I suggest that in this case you put the cosls 
upon the county. It Is able to bear them." 

In 1887 A. Nels3n Lewis, a member of the Philadelphia 
Gun Club, wae indicted before the Bucks County Court, Pa., 
under the act of March 29, 1869, which makes it a misde- 
meanor to wantonly or cruelly kill or ill-treat, overload, beat 
or otherwise abuse any animal. 

Judgment was entered in favor of the Commonwealth and 
a fine of $5 imposed on Mr. Lewis. This was was appealed 
to the Supreme Court. 

Judge Paxton, as Chief Justice (140 Pejn State, p 261), 
delivered the opinion of the Supreme C'jurt, which is as 
followf : 

"The specific charge In the indictment was that the defendant did 
•unlawfully, wantonly and cruelly shoot, wound, torture, abuse and ill- 
treat a certain pigeon,' etc. The jury found a special verdict, upon 
which Ihe court below entered judgment for the Commonwealth. We 
are, therefore, limited to the facts as found. From the verdict we learn 
'that the defendant was a member ot the asso -latlon called the Phliadel. 
pbla Gun Club; that on Dec. 14, 1887, be attended a pigeon shooting 
match and fired with a gun upon certain pigeons liberated from a trap, 
killing one and wounding another. The bird so wounded lighted upon 
a tree, and as s >on as Its w >unded condition was discovered It was killed 
by a mem oer of said club for and on behalf of said defendant, according 
to the custom of said club In regard lo wounded birds. The birds so 
killed were Immeulately sold for food, according to the rule aod custom 
of said club.' 

"We bav-e thus the finding of the jury thut the object of this Associa- 
tion was to test the skill of its members in markmansbip. Iu other 
words, it was a training school for sportsmen, in which they could 
acquire skill In shooting on the wing. This being the 0' ject of the asso. 
elation, the Jury further found that the defendant attended tor the pur- 
poses aforesaid. It was conceded that ha 1 he killed bis bird be would 
not have been liable under the act ot 1863. But having merely wounded 
It, he was guilty of cruelty under said act. 8o that the crime consisted, 
not In the fact ot the shooting, but io wounding instead of Instantly 
killing It From the facts found by the Jury, the defendant has merely 
been punl-hed for want of skill. 

"It Is doubtless true that much pain and suffering Is often caused to 
different kinds of game by this unskillfulness ot sportsmen. A squirrel 
badly wounded may crawl to Its bole aud suffer for many hours and days 
and die. It was not pretended that the act applied to such cases. The 
sportsman in the woods Is not responsible for the accuracy ot his aim 
under the act of 1869. At the same time it is manifest that much suffering 
would be spared wild game If sportsmen were better trained, skill In 
shooting upon the wing can only be gained by practice. It is not so with 
Inanimate objects. There accuracy of aim can be acquired by shooting 
at a mark. It is cone -ded that the sportsman In the woods may test his 
skill by shooting at wild birds. Why, then may he not do so with a bird 
confined in a cage and let out for that purp >se? Is the bird in the cage 
any better or lias it any higher rights than the bird In the woods T Both 
were placed here by the Almighty for the use of man. Thev were not 
given to bim to be needlessly an 1 cruelly tortured, and were there any- 
thing In the finding of the Jury to show that the object of this association 
was to torture pigeons we would not hesltat- lo sustain the judgment ol 
the cturt below. But no such purpose appears, nor Is there any fl ding 
that the defendant was guilty of needless and wanton cruelty. The bird 
was Immediately killed as soon as Its condition was discovered. 

"A distinction was pressed upon the argument between the case ot a 
captive blrn and one at large in the woods. In the latter instance 
there is a necessity to shoot it In order to capture It for food or otbe r 
lawful purpose; and If wounding results, It is an unavoidable Incident; 
while in the case ot a captive bird, no necessity exists tor putting ll to 
death In this way. Sjme force may be conceded to this as an abstrac 1 
proposition, but we do* not see Its application to the facts of this case. 
The right lo kill the pigeon was and must be conceded, and tbere Is 
no finding of the Jury that its suffering was greater b cause of the man- 
ner of lis death Iban If it had been killed In some other way. This Is 
a scientific question which I do not feel myself competent to pass i pon. 
Nor do I think the av rage juryman Is any better qualified to do so. 
It may be thai scieoce in the future will discover the method of killing 
a pigeon wl h the least possible pain. So far as other animals are con- 
cerned, 11 Is, perhaps, an open question, aud the attempt of well mean" 
Ing humanitarians in a sister Slate to reduce the sufferings of con" 
demued criminals by putting tbem to death by electricity Instead of 
by banging has produced a long controversy wblcb can har. ly be re- 
garded as settled An attempt bas b>en made, so far unsuccessfully' 
to show It is unconstitutional because of ltd crueltv. 

"We do Dot say tbere might not be a violation of the act of 1869 at a 
shooting match, but lu our view the facts found by the Jury do Dot 
bring this case within It. The judgment is reversed." 



Reports from the Bridges are to the effect that canvasback 
and bluebills are in that section in plentiful numbers. 



The bay off Bu'.chertown, San Bruno and in the vicinity 
of Baden is carpeted with myriads of ducks, principally 
bluebills. 

The local trap shooting season opens on March 1st The 
gun clubs are already preparing for the various live bird 
and blue rock meetings. 



CARTRIDGE AND SHELL. 



A jib lot of sweaters on the counters of the H. E. Skinner 
Company have caught on. They are going fast, price and 
q lslity being satisfactory. 

The "Pastimes" who are located at Alvarado had an ex- 
cellent day's fowling on Sunday last, ten shooters being in 
the party and at the club ark. 



Ducks are reported to be plentiful near Rio Vista, and 
market hunters are said to be shipping tbem from that paint 
to San Francisco in large numbers. 



Hackmeir Brothers had the pleasure of distributing seventy 
ducks, mixed in variety, to their friends — these ducks were 
bigged on Sunday last near Alvarado. 



Lee Larzilere, J. R Burfeind aod Geo. Wolf shot in the 
Spooney Gun Club preserve on Sunday. The bag, C3nsisl- 
iog of cans, sp Doners and bluebills, was a large one. 



Karney and Bruns brought down from 8ears Point on 
Sunday one dozen cans. Tbey report plentr of birds in that 
section all, however, staked out on the "ovetrl jw' and hard 
to get at. 

Joe Bickerstaff, a genial sportsman who is as good on blue- 
rocks as he is on ducks, bagged sixty ducks at Mt. Elen last 
Sunday. Joe has shot over the same section for several 
seasons past. 

Mr. C. P. Ferrel, a Reno sportsman who was in Oregon 
recentlv, bas made arrangements to receive a number of 
Chinese pheasants this spring which will be used as a nucleus 
for stocking Nevada with that game bird. 



A boon to the hunter or angler is a flexible warm garment 
— one that will keep out wind and moisture. Clabrough, 
Golcher and Companv have on hand some Swedish tanned 
dogskin coats lined with flannel that are j ist the thing. 



The Schelville Rod and Gun Club has been muchly an- 
noyed by poachers recently, who make a pract ce of shooting 
at nighl; this frightens the birds away from the preserve 
The clubmen propose to put on an extra force of keepers. 

James Maynard Jr. and Thos. Macauley shot on the 
Willow Lodge preserve Sunday. The rain had fl >oded the 
blinds and the hunters took to their duckboats and worked 
the sloughs in the marsh. A good bag resulted, principally 
caovasbacks. 

8an Pablo, Suisun and Richardson's bays are still fre 
qiiented by immense fl >cks of canvasback and bluebills." 
Hunters who go after them in boats and who are posted in 
favorable positions on shore have made choice bags during 
the past ten days. 

Murdock and Klevesahl, with the exception of downing a 
quartette of qu ackers, did but little else last Sunday than specu- 
late upon the pecular resemblance to Noah's Ark their own 
ark at Petaluma creek cut fl >ating in the muddy ocean cover- 
ing their usual shooting district. 



Jack Sauter, who is somewhat of an angler also, set forth 
last Sunday to Richardson's bay with his trusty shotgun. 
Oae bluebill, ditto "sawbill," ditto ''can," was the bag. 
Mister Burfeind made up a table complement out of his own 
bag for a duck dinner in the Sauter menage. 



Olympic Gun Club shooters were somewhat disconcerted 
by the news from Suisun last Saturday that the club's pre- 
serve was "a lake, no ducks in sight." This condition of 
sfftirs was applicable to mast of the hunting gr >ut.di in that 
district. Notwithstanding some good bagi of "cans" were 
made on the Pringje ponds. 



Q lail hunting in Marin county will close on Monday. 
The season in Nonoms, Alameda and Santa Clara closes on 
February 1st. Contra Costa and Napa counties are open 
until March 1st Qiail hunters have had to yield the palm 
to the duck men recen'ly. Io most quail districts the birds 
have been driven to heavy cover by the rains and conse- 
quently are very hard to work. 



Among a number of trap shooters the feeling has rapidly 
grown that there is too great a diversity of interests for the 
reason that there is a larger number of gun clubs in this city 
than the sport will maintain for best results. In this respect 
«( are advised that there is now in circulation a well founded 
rumor intimating a probable consolidation of the San F ran- 
cisco aod Lincoln Gun Ciubs during the coming trap season. 



Messrs. Plummer and Phillips on Sunday had a combined 
bag of forty ducks shot near Newark. 



The heavy rain Sunday morning spoiled the sport of many 
city hunters who were out duck hunting. 



The Alameda Gun Club members who were at the elub 
preserves on Petaluma creek last Saturday and Sunday all 
made good bags. The ponds on this shooting grouod are 
levied aod kept well baited. Good bags have been the rule 
for several weeks past. Recently a Sunday morning shoot 
indulged in by five members had to be curtailed for lack of 
ammunition — the bountiful supply of birds exceeding all 
anticipations. 

Oakland estuary has recently been the resort of numerous 
flocks of ducks. Oakland and Alameda gunners have in- 
dulged in sculling for them, with good results. Night shoot- 
ing must be much in vogue on the mud Iv creek, every night 
for a week past the reports of shotguns were frequently heard. 
Many large fl icks of ducks are also seen daily near the rail- 
road bridges and in the water between the mouth of the 
estuary and Oakland wharf. 



January 13, 1900] 



27 



Chas. Nobmsn made a curious find in a spoonbill duck he 
shot at Point Reyes recently. In drawing the 'slioveler' 
he found an obstruction in the crop which proved to be a 
four-inch catfish, in the mouth of the fish was a laree sized 
hook with several inches of gut attached. Point Reyes is 
noted as a favorite resort for the angler, but it is not often 
that one draws a prizs in the lottery of sport containing the 
dual features of gun and rod. 



Those of the duck hunting brigade who favor the eastern 
bav shore marshes for a day's shooting have been "strictly in 
it" for the past two weeks. Many individual bags fell to the 
guns of persistent hunters who had notches cut in their 
blinds for numerous unfruitful days' waiting for a shot earlier 
during the season. The ducks, is usual at this season of the 
year, have sought food and shelter in that section from the 
rain and wind storms lately prevailing. 



The idea which has become so common among Southern 
sportsmen, that canvasbacks have abandoned Louisiana as a 
feeding ground, is entirely unfounded. At present there are 
more canvasbacks in the State than there have been in a 
number of years. Thty are very wild, however, and their 
closely-knitted feathers make it a difficult matter for the 
hunter to bring them down. They are present now in thou- 
sands near the Gulf, at any rate, and next month it is pre- 
dicted bv those who claim to know, there will be a great 
many more. 

Fourteen miles west of Merced, by reason of a broken 
levee on the east bank of the San Joaquin, there is a fl >oded 
track of some 2000 acres which has been literally packed 
with thousands upon thousands of mallard and sprig who are 
feeding upon the submerged smartweed, the tops of which 
are within a few inches of the water's surface. They will 
probably stay there as long as the weed is palatable to them. 
The market hunters have had a picoio at this spot, making 
big bags daily. 

Two weeks ago Peter Hart of Wheatland tried the ingen- 
ious expedient of extracting with a hammer and nail a loaded 
shell from a single barreled shotgun. Singular to re- 
late there was an explosion aod two medical gentlemen sub- 
sequently inventoried the damages as follows: Thumb and 
first finger to the right hand a total loss, the whole right hand 
badly lncerated, face badlv powder burned. The unfortunate 
but exceedingly careless Peter has expressed a determination 
to let guns alone hereafter. 



Duck hunters who selected the Reclaimation district for 
their shooting last Sunday found an inland sea; broken levees, 
the rain and high tides gave the ducks an area of feeding and 
resting territory that taxed the strategy of the most expert 
hunters to get within shooting distance, taking them in 
tii.hi was out of the question, they simply rose up in the air 
when they pleased and took any old air line route to 
whatsoever point of destination was their particular choice, 
leaving the shooters generally in a position far to the rear. 



The quail season in Los Angeles closed on January 1st, 
but the prospects were not considered favorable for an active 
season, which lasted just 31 days, as the past dry winters 
have been unfavorable for breeding. The quail have, how- 
ever, been well preserved, and with a wet seosor, which 
assures plenty cf feed, will multiply in great cumbers. Since 
1889 these birds have become more and more scarce. Lack 
of tain and proper protection, the outlook up to a compara- 
tively short time ago has been far from pleasing to the 
sportsmen Present indications now point to a wonderful 
change in 1900. 

Fred W. Kelley, Harry Eelley and Fred Russ Cook took 
the staunch yacht Harpoon out last Saturday for a duck 
hunting cruise "up the river." Tides, wind and weather 
threatened to be obstacles that would effectually spoil the 
shooting features of the outing. They anchored in pictur- 
esque Paradise cove for the night. Next morning in 6pite 
of the uninviting outlook they had a good shoot and made 
an excellent combined bag. Had they been able to make 
the Corte Madera creek, which was fairly alive with "cans," 
they would have had an opportunity for shooting ducks such 
as rarely is offered the hunter. 



A frequent writer on sporting topics and known to many 
sportsmen in this btate is " Reel foot " In a recent commun- 
ication to The Amateur Sportsman anent "medium priced 
guns" and some of the dangers attendant upon their use he 
says: 

"The cheapest guns made for nitros are, of course, the re- 
peaters The Winchester is the best of these. The lever 
action Winchester is not adapted to nitro powder; I once 
shot a hundred 2^-dram 1 ads of 'E. C ' from one, and every 
load (shell) burst around the head, blowing out a quantity of 
the paper through the brass. This satisfied me, so I sold it 
and bought a Model 1893, which gave better results. I next 
went in for double barrels and among the next guns I owned 
was mv famous old, No. 84,321. This is now in the posses- 
sion of Mr. Ferrell, of the Redlands Light Co.; it has been 
fired thousands of times and is yet as good as new I have 
offered him all kinds of trades for it, but he says that 1 ought 
to have kept it when I had it, as now it is not for sale. This 
is the gun with which I made a run of oinetv-four live birds 
in 1897. I am now shooting a '97 Model Winchester. It 
shoots good and works better than any repeater 1 ever used, 
but a well defined air bell in the side of the receiver shows it 
to be of pot metal, and cast at that, so you need not be sur- 
prised if when you bear from me again that I am shooting 
gome fellow's old Smith, Greener or Remington double barrel 
instead of the newer — but poor — Winchester 'Trombone.' 
I am doing a lot of experimenting now, but am not learning 
much, as I am canvassing territory that has been pretty 
thoroughly worked over. 

Of these 'medium priced' guns I think they would be all 
right for good black powder, but for nitro, 'not much, Mary 
Ann.' " m 

The Game Law. 



The synopsis of the game laws appearing below and pub- 
lished in the Breeder and Sportsman for several years 
past has, from time to time been changed or the provisions 
of new ordinances added thereto by reason of the many and 



various changes in the county game and fish laws, particu- 
larly those of recent date and of application in and around 
the bay counties. 

This synopsis has been frequently copied (in more or less 
garbled and incomplete form) and quoted by city and interior 
journals and has also been printed and distributed by busi- 
ness houses. While the information given at the date of is- 
suance was substantially correct, we do not care to be held 
responsible for the circulation of old matter that is now in- 
correct in many details. Some complaint has been made in 
this respect and to avoid misunderstanding in the future it is 
suggested that for information of this character a reference 
be msde to current numbers of the Bbbeder and Sports 
man for the latest and most complete .data coneerning the 
Game Laws. 

The county enactments relative to the shipment of game 
have become inoperative under the decision of the Supreme 
Court of California, rendered December 5, 1899, in the case 
of James Knapp on habeas corpus, appealed from the 
Superior Court of Stanislaus county. 

The open Beason for shooting quail, doves, deer and wild duck as 
fixed oy the State law is as follows: Doves, 15th July to 15th Febru- 
ary. Mountain quail and grouse, 1st September to 15th February. 
Valley quail, wild duck and rail, let October to 1st March. Male deer, 
15th July to 15th October. Pheasants, the taking, killing, selling or 
having m possession at any lime is prohibited ; robbing or destruc- 
tion of nests or having pheasant eggs in possession is a misdemeanor 
in the following couuties: Butte. Trinity, Marin, Lake. Merced- 
Kiverside. Los Angeles, San Bernardino. Santa Barbara, Kings, Ven, 
tura, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Joaquin, Yuba. 

The cleras of nearly all the Boards of suoervlsors have advised us 
no changes have been made this year, but the ordinances passed 
last vear hold good if they do not conflict with the State law. The 
following counties nave not passed any ordinances that alter 
the open season as provided by State law : Amador. Butte, Inyo, 
Modoc, Mono, Mendocino, Mariposa, Nevada, Napa, Plumas, 
San Diego, 8olano. shkivou, Tehama, and Yolo. 

The changes are as follows : 

Alpine— Deer. Sept. 2 to Oct. 15. 

Alameda— Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 1. Male deer. July 15 to Oct. 1. 
Pheasants protected until February, 1904. Hunting, killing or hav- 
ing In possession for purpose of sale or shipment out of county: 
quail, bob white, paruidge, wild duck, rail, mountain quail, grouse, 
dove, does or deer, antelope, elk or mountain sheep prohibited. 

Colusa— Deer, Aug. 15 to Oct. 15. 

Calaveras — Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Contra Costa— Deer, July 20 to Sept. 2. (Use of dogs prohibited). 

El Dorado— Doves, July 20 to Feb. 1. Trout, Jnne 1 to Dec 1. 

Fresno— Valley quail. Nov. 1 to Jan. 31. Individual baa limited to 
25 quail per flay. Mountain quail, Sept. 1 to Feb. 15. Doves. Aim 15 
to Feb 16: Pheasanti, bob whit*- quail and pi airie chickens, close 
season iu for e for an indefinite p> riod. Use of nets or seines in 
county waiers|prohibiied. Shipmeni of game from county prohibited. 

Glenn— Deer, venison, d'i.-d venisou, neer skiu, buck, doe or fawn; 
quail, grouse, pheasant, dove, plover, snipe or wild duck, shipping or 
inking out of the county prohibited 25 birds per year individual 
limit 10 be taken from the county upou licensed permission. 

Humboldt — urouse and Wilson snipe, oepl. 1 to Feo. 10. Killing of 
waterfowl prohibited between one-half hour after sunset and one 
half hour before sunrise. Pheasants and wild turkeys protected 
unMlOct. 1, 1900. Black brant, Oct. 1 to March 1. Shipment of game 
out of the couutv prohibited. Deer, use of dogs prohibited. Striped 
bass— Close season uuiil Jan. 1, 1905 

Kern— Shipping game out of the county prohibited. Quail, Oct. 1 
to Feb 1 Bronze Ibis or curlew— Robbing or destroying nests or 
taking eggs, prohibited. 

Kings— Doves, Sept. 1 to Feb. 15. Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb 15. 

Lake — Deer, Aug. 1 to Oct. 1. -> 

Los Angeles— Male deer, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. Valley quail, bob 
white or mountain quail. Dec ltoJan.l. Doves, July 15 to Oct. 1. 
Showing for sale, or shipment of quail, bob white, partridges, pheas- 
ants, grouse, doves, ducks, rails or oiher game protected by statute, 
prohibited. Ducks, individual bag limited to 25 biros per day. 
Shipping game lo maneis outside ot tne county prohibited, sea- 
gulls, earets, pelicans, seals, protected. Trout season opens April 1 st 

Marin— Deer, July 15 to Sept. 15. Quail, partridge or grouse, Oct. 15 
toJau.15 Individual bag limited to 25 birds per day. Market huutiug 
and shipment of game from the county is prohibited Use of 
Repeating shot guns prohibited. Killing of meadow larks or 
any other song birds prohibited. Hunting within private enclosures 
or on public roads prohibited. Trout, with book and liue only, Apri 1 
to Oct. 15. 

Madera— Market hunting prohibited. 

Monterey— Deer, Julv 15th to Sept. 1st. (Use of dogs prohibited). 
Quail. Oct. 1 to Feb. 1. Shipping or taking game out of the county 
prohibited. 

Napa— Trout, by hook and line only. April 1 to Dec. 1. 

Orange— Doves, Aug. l to Feb. 1. Deer. aue. In lo Oct. 1. (Market 
hunting prohibited). Quail, partridges or grouse, Oct. 1 to Oct. 6. 
Ducks, Nov. 1 to March 1 Ducks and quail, shipment from the 
county restricted as follows: No person shall ship ducks or quail 
out of the county in quantities to exceed two dozen birds a week. 
Market hunting prohibited. 
k Placer— t rout, tune 1 to Dec. 1» 

Plumas— Salmon, trout, May 1 to Dec 1 (netting prohibited.) 

Riverside— Male deer, close seasou uuiil July 15, 1901. July 15 to 
Sept. 15, tnereaiter. Quail, Individual bag limited to 20 bi.ds per 
day. Mountain or valley qusil, pheasant and wild duck, sale of pro- 
hibited in the county. Wild duck, valley or mountain quail, ship- 
ment from county prohibiied. Trout, any variety, close season until 
May 1, 1901. May 1 to Dec. 1, thereaflf r. 

Sacramento Quail, ducks, doves, plieasantB; shooting for sale and 
maraet out of county prohibited. Taking or shipping out of county 
of more than ten birds in one day by any person prohibited 

San Benito — Deer. Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. Market hunting and ship- 
ment of game out of county prohibited Quail, partridge or grouse, 
Oct 15 to Feb. 1. Individual bag limited to 30 biids per day. 
Mountain quail, perpetual close season. Trout, April 1 to Oct 15. 

Ban Bernardino— l)eer r July 15 to Sept 15;(clOBe season continuous, 
1<)99.) Valley or mountain quail, wild duck, Bale of and shipment 
oui of county prohibited. Trout, catching or sale of, between April 
1st and May 1st of any year and durlug 1899, prohibited. Tree 
BquirrelB. five per day the Individual limit. 

San Diego— Shippi rg game out of the county prohibited, 

San J. aquin— Shipping or taking game out of the county pro- 
hibited, shooting on public n ad prohibited. 

San Luis Obispo— Deer, July 15 lo Sept. 1. U«e of hounds prohib- 
ited Doves, July 15 to Dec. 1. Hunting for markets aitnated outside 
of the county prohibited. Clams, use of plows or machines in digging 
prohibited. Shipment of abalones out of the county prohibited. 

Sau Mateo— Deer, Aug. 1 to Sept It. (Use of dogs uot prohibited. 
Market hunting prohibited). Rai I . Oct. 1 5 to Nov 1. (Shooting from 
boat at high tide prohibited). Quail, Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. 

Santa Barbara— Deer, Aug. 1 to Aug 22. Use of houndB pro- 
hibited. Quail, Nov. 1 to Mar^h 1. Dove, Aug. 15 to Feb. 16. 
Market hunting and sale of game In the county prohibited. Lobsters 
or crawfish, close season, April 15 to Ang. 15, shipping from county 
in close seasou prohibited. Abalones, taking, selling, having in 
possession and shipping from the county prohibited. Clams can not 
be dug till July. 1902 

Sauta Clara— Male deer, July 15 to Oct. 15. Valley or mountain 
quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 1. Individual bag limited to 20 blrdB per day, 
Quail, pheasants and doves, purchase and sale, or shipment out of. 
or lino l be county prohibited. W ild duck, purchase and sole, or 
shipmeni out of county of ducks killed In the county prohibited (In 
force Nov 9). 

Santa Cruz— Shipping game from the county prohibited 
Shasta— Deer, July la to Sept. l. Shipment of feathered game out 
of the county prohibited. 
Sierra— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 16. 

BiBklyou— Shipment of feathered game out ot thecouuty prohibited. 

Sonoma— Deer. July 15 to Oct. 1. Quail, Nov. 1. to Feb. 1 Pheas- 
ants, clone season till Jan 1, 1901. Shipping game out of the county, 
hunting wiibm prlvntc enclosures, prohibited. Use of nets iu streams 
ot the county prohibited. 

MianlsiHiix — Wild ducks, dove, quail or snipe, shipment from the 
county prohibited. 

Sutter— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 16. Doves, July 16 to Jan. 1. 

Trinity— Deer, 8ept. 1 to Oct. 16. 

Tulare— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oot. 15. Shipping game out ot the county 
prohibited. 

Vonmra— Quail, any vaMpiy. Oct 1 to Nov 1. Huntlug for sale 
or market of quail, grouse, dove, wild duck, deer or mountain sheep 
prohibited, except between Oct. 10th and 15ih. 

Yuba— Shipping ducks and quail from the county to market pro- 
hibited. 




Looking Forward 



Shut the storm doors, close the blind. 
Draw the shades down, snug and tight, 

Gather close around the hearth 
'Tisa bitter Winter night. 

How the north winds rage without, 

As they whirl the drifting snow ; 
But, within, is quiet warmth, 

Tempered by the Are light's glow. 

Now inspect the well-tried rods, 

Trusted friends for many a year, 
Oil the reels, their vibrant song 

Is sweet music to the ear. 

Test the lines acd leaders well, 

Rearrange the books of flies; 
There will soon be warm south winds. 

Lengthening days and balmy skies. 

Then beside the meadow brook, 

Or upon the liver's breast, 
Fisbiug, you shall pleasure find, 

And with pleasure, health and rest. 

— F. Q. iu The Amateur Sportsman. 



Banquet of the Fly-Castere. 

The members of the 8an Francisco Fly-Casting Club and 
their guests attended the initial meeting and monthly din- 
ner of th» club for the season of 1900 last Tuseday evening. 
That these gatherings are happily appreciated and looked 
forward to by the jolly coterie of anglers is shown in the 
increased attendance of the rod wielders at each successive 
rally around the oak. Presidenl Walter G. Mansfield as 
master of ceremonies looked after the comfort of over seventy 
guests in his usual masterful style. 

The assembly was most erjoyably entertained by Fish 
Commissioner Alex T. Vogelsang, who in a few brief and 
witty remarks gave a synopsis of numerous incidents and ex- 
periences occurring during a recent Eastern trip. Some of 
his observations were of a very radical character, but his 
audience willingly overlooked this, the tenor of bis discourse 
being a panegyric on California and its never failing glorious 
climate. Vocal selections by F. Monogram Thompson, Ben 
Tarbox aod Fred Surrhyne were artistically rendered. John 
F. Siebe Jr. created pan-demonium whilst illustrating a very 
amusing bit of Chitese lyrical comedy. A musical feature 
of the evening were the zither selections of Chas. Mayer Jr , 
who plays this most charming instrument with the skill and 
execution of a yirtuoso. A number of popular selections 
were given by a string orchestra accompanied by the c'ink- 
ing and merry choruses of the diners. The rag-time clog 
solo of Messrs. Thompson snd Siebe, manipulated with 
spoons, was so realistic that John Butler, F. R. S. A., shed 
tears of regret that President John Lemmer, B. M , was 
absent and missed the opportunity of his life in studying 
hammer melody. The roast ducks served were the gift of 
Mr. Channing Mansfield and some of his Napa friends. 

It was announced that the initial fly-casting contests for 
this season wi 1 he held at Stow Lake on the third Saturday, 
and Sunday in February. On the first and second Sundays 
in February, the club tackle will be at the disposal of new 
membeis for preliminary practice, several of the veterans 
will be present tor the purpose of coaching the novices. 

AmoDg those present were: W. D. Mansfield, H. F. 
Muller, W. A. L. Miller, A. M nller, J. H. Lowe, E A. 
Mocker, Frank P. McLennan, J. Peltier, 8. Rosenbaum, G. 
F. Klink, F. H. Reid, J. O. Sanooro, Orrin Peck, C. F. 
8tone, H. E. Skinner, J. A. 8anborn, Alfred Hutro, J F. 
Siebe Jr., J. 8. Turner, C. W. Walker, H. C. Wyman, G. 
Walker, C. G. Solomon, Boswell Keonifl, James Watts, 
Roland Kenniff, G. Young, C. C. Stratton, Al Hall, Judge 
John Hunt, 8. A. Heller, Charles Huyck, William Conrad, 
R iBenbruck, William Robs, F. S.Johnson, F. B. Surrybne, 
Charles Klein, Will iao) Keliebor, Fraok W. Thouppon, H. 
J. C. Kierulfl, Ben Tarbox, Charles Mayer, A. T. Vogel- 
sang, A. E. Lovett, M. C Allen, E T. Allen, H. Battu, 
John Butler, Louis Butler, J. P. Bab-cock, John Lawrence, 
W A. Cooper, H. G. W. Dinkelspiel, F. E Daverkosen, J. 
X. DeWitt, Edward Everett, Clark Wise, A. R. Finch, E. 
W. Watson, H. C. Golcher, E. H. Horton. C. W. Hibbard, 
W. E. Dassonvilie, R A. Smyth, .M. J. Geary, G. H. 
Foulkes. 

Sleelhead are in evidence at Point Reyes, the water at this 
writing should be clear and in good condition fur angling. 
Salmon creek is also a promising stream juBt now. The 
fish are commencing to run and local anglers are on the qui 
vive. Frank Maskey and John Butler are at the Point 
station to-day among the advance guard. 

The 8an Gregorio is recently reported lo have given 
anglers one or two good catches. This stream is looked upon 
as a first cla6B fishing water and should give excellent sport 
just as soon as the water — which has been very murky — com- 
mences to clear. 

Col. Keliehor is again with us, having recently returned 
after spending seueral weeks tarpon fishing at Aransas Bay, 
Texas. Tba Colonel has an eye on the possibilities of 
Russian river. 

Local anglers anticipate plenty of good sport on Russian 
river in about a week, it will take fully that long for the 
waters to clear. 

Some nice trout were caught about ten days ago at the 
mouth of Sonoma creek neer Shellville. 



28 



[January 13, 1900 



THE FARM. 



Curing PorK. 



Ayrshiree. 



As this is the Beason for "hog killing" the 
following instructions for curing pork will 
not be out of place: First of all let the meat 
get thoroughly cooled before salting. I 
usually slaughter ic the forenoon, cut up and 
trim in the evening, spreading the meat out 
so it will readily cool, then begin the salting 
process next morning. I place the meat on 
an inclined plane, first removing the ham 
bones to the ball and socket joint, then for 
100 pounds of meat use four pounds best fine 
salt, one pound of sugar, and four ounces of 
salt peter; the latter must be thoroughly pul- 
verized; mix thoroughly and rub it into the 
flesh side of the meat and well into the shanks 
of the joints. When the mixture has struck 
in, rub again. There will be enough to rub 
the above amount of meat three times. It 
usually takes about three weeks to complete 
the job and the size of the meat does not 
matter, as it will not take any more than the 
right quantity and all will be alike and just 
right for cooking, and for either ham or 
bacon. If these directions are intelligently 
followed the quality cannot be excelled. Hang 
up and smoke immediately with hickory chips 
if possible. The great advantage of the in- 
clined plane is in allowing all liquids coming 
from the meat to immediately pass away and 
not rise up and around it. Oae who has never 
tried the plan will be astonished at the amount 
that will pass off from the meat of one or 
two good hogs. After the meat is smoked 
place it in tight muslin bags, place in barrel 
(preferable) and fill all space between and 
around the meat with dry salt. Oats, cut 
■traw, or hay, is also good. Then you are 
safe from the flies. 

For pickling, we take fresh side meat, cut- 
ting into strips about six inches wide, stand 
edgewise, skin side out, in the barrel or jar 
(preferably the latter, and whichever it bs see 
that it is scrupulously clean), first putting in 
a light coat of salt so as to entirely hide the 
pork. Repeat in the same manner until the 
barrel is full or the pork is all in. Cover the 
top layer thickly with salt, then make a brine 
by adding salt to boiling water until it will no 
longer dissolve the salt. Let stand until cold 
then cover the meat comple ely and weight 
down heavily so as to keep it at all times 
under the brine. 

Milk Preservatives. 



Look out for the man with the patent 
milk preservatives. 

There are various agents now abroad in the 
land selling "Freezene," "No-ice-needed Pre- 
servative," "Liquid Milk Sweet," and several 
such nostrums intended incidentally to keep 
milk from souring, and primarily to gather in 
the farmer's loose change. 

In all those several cases which have been 
reported the chemical basis of the preservative 
is the same. It is formaldehyde — formalin — 
a powerful disinfectant and germicide, but not 
a desirable article of diet for the human 
species. It is not strictly and seriously poi- 
sonous, but it is held by all the best authori- 
ties to be harmful to the digestive system. 

It is the same material now largely in use 
in creameries for preserving samples of milk 
for testing. It will certainly keep milk from 
souring; and it thus enables the slovenly 
dairyman to cover up many of his worst neg- 
ligences. It leaves him free to enjoy the filth 
of an unclean stable, to save himself the 
trouble of cleaning his cans, to be as loose 
and lazv and wicked as he pleases. 

That is not to say that the man who uses 
Preservative, Freezene and the like is neces- 
sarily that sort of a fellow; but these chemicals 
do protect him from the results of negligence 
and ignorance, and seem, to the unprejudiced 
observer, to offer the careless milkman an un- 
desrved salvation from bis sins. 



Mr. Theodore Reed, of Moscow, Idaho, has 
been in California during the past week look- 
ing for full blooded cattle and sheep with 
which to improve the stock of his State. Mr. 
Reed believes that small farmers should aim 
to improve their herds by using the best 
males to be found. He intends calling on 
several California cattle and sheep breeders 
b afore leaving California. 



Upon being asked why he liked the Ayr- 
shires, a breeder recently made the following 
reply: 

Because they are essentially the common 
farmers' breed, being large produces of a very 
superior quality of milk; good feeders in the 
barn, great foragers in the pastuies; quiet with 
the fences; of good dispositions; easily 
handled; freer from diseases than probably 
anv other breed; having good square udders 
carried well up and forward. 

While all breeds make some special claim 
to individual merit; as the Jersey for quality 
and the Holstein for quantity of milk, yet the 
Ay rehires combine all these good qualities in 
such high degree as to place them easily in 
the forefront as a most desirable breed for all 
farmers. With our present improved methods 
of manipulating milk into butter and cheese, 
the Ayrshire has taken a long step ahead, and 
is destined to become a powerful competitor 
in all breed distinctions. 

In quantity of milk produced, the Ayrshire 
is now taking the lead in herd records for 
milk production, and in quality of milk sur- 
passing even the Jersey, both as to quantity 
of butter from given quantity of milk and 
cream, and as to keeping and shipping quali- 
ties of milk and butter; and in tbese respects 
it is admitted by many owners of other breeds 
to be superior. 

While I do not claim perfection for the 
Avrshire8, yet they do possess so many good 
points as to commend them most strongly to 
the consideration of all practical farmers. 
Having kept both Holsteins and Jerseys, I 
can say from actual experience that the Ayr- 
shires have been freer from organic and 
structural diseases than either of the above 
breeds, and the experience of other practical 
farmers and of professional veterinarians coin- 
cides precisely with mine, making this a strong 
point of superiority in the Ayrshire for the 
common farmer to consider. Their quiet 
and thoroughly domestic disposition is a greet 
point in their favor, and their characteristic- 
ally strong constitution appeals to the com- 
mon farmer's need. 

Their full, round, bright eyes, prompt and 
intelligent movements, quickness to appreciate 
kind treatment and to respond to high keep- 
ing, are other points in their favor; and if by 
force of circumstances the farmer is compelled 
to deal out rough and coarse fodder, they take 
it with hearty good appetites, and almost 
thirve on what other breeds will actually 
grow poor on. These, with many other good 
features, must compel recognition for this 
bightly profitable and practical breed of cattle. 
Never having been unduly pampered for great 
milking and show records, they have passed 
hrough generation after generation of good 
breeding with vigor unimpaired and qualities 
unsurpassed. 

The Age for Breeding 



The best lambs are obtained from rams 
when one, two and three years old because 
they are then in their best vigor. At these 
ages they may be mated with one hundred 
females if they are well fed, although in the 
range country the rule is from forty to fifty to 
each buck. They may be used as old as five, 
six and seven years, when they ate really 
good ones, but we may expect better lambs 
from them when they are younger. Ewes 
should not be bred until after they have been 
shorn once. If they are bred as lambs 
they will not grow so large themselves, nor 
will they raise large lambs, so that when any- 
one practices breeding females as lambs he 
certainly does that which will injure the size 
of his sheep When a young ewe has to nor- 
ish a lamb and make growth at the same 
time she cannot make so good growth herself, 
as the lamb is a drain upon her system and 
she cannot nourish it so well either before or 
after birth, because she has to do something 
at building up ber own frame. The best lambs 
mav be expected from ewes two, three and 
four years old at the time they drop their 
lambs, but sometimes it may pay to keep 
them longer. It will be necessary to change 
the rams every two years where the flock is 
not large, for if this is not done, then the ram 
would be bred to females of his own offspring, 
and that would be what is termed in-and-in- 



breeding, which if practiced frequently would 
lead to harmful results. The ewes should be 
in good condition at the mating season. If 
they are poor, they will not likely breed until 
they put on a good deal of flesh. This may 
prolong the lambing season so that it will ex- 
tend over many weeks, which is not desirable. 



Feed for Young Pigs. 



Prof. Thomas Shaw recommends the follow, 
ing supplemental feed for young pigs where 
they do not get enough feed from the sow: If 
there is skim milk on hand, partition off a 
place in the pen where the dam is, if necessary, 
but which she cannot reacb, and there, in a 
low trough, feed some skim milk as soon as 
the pigs will drink it. As soon as they take 
it freely feed them a slop of shorts and milk 
Then give them a little oats or corn strewn 
on the floor in addition to the slop. Feed the 
slop so that it will not become stale at any 
time. If there is no skim milk at hand, a 
thin slop of shorts and water is next best' 
presumably a little warm if the weather is 
cool. But when the trough room is amplei 
young pigs may have their food supplemejted 
by allowing them to eat with the dam at will. 
The same kinds of food that are best suited to 
provide an abundance of good pure milk from 
the dam will alone provide the right sort of 
feed for the pigs. But the trough should be 
low, and one or more planks in front of it, e 
that the little pigs can easily get into it, and 
care shculd be taken not to feed much bran or 
the hulls of oats to the sow when the pigs are 
learning to eat, as such food is too coarse for 
tbe dig stion of tbe little pigs. It is surprig 
ing how soon they will learn to eat thus along- 
with the dam. Take it all in all, there is 
perhaps no better mode of management than 
that just subscribed for average conditions. It 
is tbe least labored. It answers very well and 
forces one to be cautious as to the character of 
the food given to the dam. 



Highest Price In Sixteen Years. 



The center of attraction at the Chicago 
Stock Yards last month was sixteen bead of 
high-grade Angus beeves averaging 1538 
pounds for which the sky-scraping price of 
$ i 25 was obtained. This is the highest sale 
in considerably more ;htn fifteen years. The 
cattle were raised, fed and owned by the 
noted feeder and Aberdeen Argus breeder, 
Mr. L. H. Kerick, of Bloomington, 111. They 
were purchased by Mr. Isador Brown for 
Armour. These calves were not "fattened" in 
the ordinary sense of the term. Mr. Eer- 
rick says: "I do not fatten cattle; I grow beef.'> 
These words give an excellent idea of Mr. 
Eerrick's feeding methods. Instead of taking 
the frame of a matured steer and covering it 
with a layer of fat. Mr. Eerrick starts the 
beef-making process before tbe calf is fairly 
weaned, and before it leaves its dam the 
youngster is eating meal, etc , line a good 
fellow. Eerrick's cattle never know what it 
is to be hungry from calfhood to maturity. 
The first year of their existence these cattle 
were fed liberally, but not crowded. After 
that they were gradually worked on to full 
seed, consisting of a varied ration of which 
corn formed tbe staple constituent. They 
sometimes had a little bran as well as oats, 
and were also given oilmeal to some extent, 
but never more than one pound per head per 
day. For roughage they had corn fodder, 
clover, timothy, rich blue grasf and oat straw. 
Mr. Eerrick believes in tempting the appetite 
with a varied ration, and this successfully 
sustains his position. Eindnesj is the rule 
on his farm, and everyone of the steers was as 
gentle as a kitten. — Drover's Journal. 



Salting Butter. 



There are three ways of salting butter. One 
is bp brine salting, letting it stand in brine for 
a short time after the buttermilk has been 
thoroughly washed out and while the butter 
is yet in a granular form. Another plan is 
to wash out the buttermilk and gather the 
butter together in a mass and then sprinkle 
the salt over i(; give a few turns to the churn 
to incorporate the suit with the butter. A third 
plan is to take the butter out of tbe churn 
and put on the table or in a worker; sprinkle 
the necessary quantity of salt over it then 
work it with a ladle or with the butter 
worker. 



A new method of handling the range cattle 
business is announced as on trial. The Dun- 
bar Cattle Company of Wyoming introduced 
it for the management of its enormous busi- 
ness. It consists substantially of dividing the 
great beads into small bunches, each of which 
is to be managed and controlled by a small sep- 
arate company, all such companies to be under 
the general supervision of the mother corpor- 
ation. Judging by the articles filed by tbe 
small companies tbus far organized, pursuant 
to tbe plan, they are to be capitalized at about 
115,000 each. 

The investigations made by tbe bureau of 
animal industry have not yet resulted in the 
discovery of a dip that will destroy ticks 
without doicg serious injury to the cattle 
also. It is not probable that the bureau cffi- 
cials bavs abandoned their investigations, but 
no experimental work has been reported for 
Borne time, and dipping is not likely to be 
employed again until a dip that has been 
demonstrated to be effective in destroying 
ticks and harmless to the cattle shall have 
been discovered. 



The dairy products of the United States in 
1898 were worth about $500,000,000. In the 
entire country there are about 16,000000 
milch cows. The annual consumption of 
milk is about 1,750,000,000 gallons, while 
1,500,000,000 pounds of butter and 300,000,- 
000 pounds of cheese are produced. A great 
enemy of the dairy interests is' oleomargarine, 
of which in the last fiscal year 87 S00,000 
pounds were manufactured, as compared with 
57,516,000 pounds in 18H7. 



Hamlen & Chism, the stock-drovers, have 
jui-t imported two carloads of hogs for the 
trade in Grass Valley, and they have been 
bought up by the local butchers of that city. 
These hogs were brought out on the trains all 
the way from Missouri, and were imported 
from Colfax over the narrow gauge. The 
hogs arrived in good condition and are said 
to be superior to the California-raised pro- 
duct. — Nevada City Herald. 



The humble cow has suddenly taken a boom 
and soon will be an expensive necessity. No 
good cows can he purchased now short of $50, 
and the chances are (he price will go above 
that. With the advent of the creameries and 
condensed milk factories throughout the State 
there is being created a demand for milk un- 
equalled before in tbe industrial history of 
the country.- — Dixon Tribune. 



Claus Spreckels has purchased the Finnel 
ranch in Tehama county. The ranch consists 
of 30,000 acres. When it passes into the 
hands of its new owners it will be used for the 
cultivation sf sugar beets. A beet sugar fac- 
tory is one of the possibilities for Tehama 
ceunty. 



J^. i~ i ir>r>c cni ivtc cdavimc VVIvnDllPP^ ' 



CURBS, SPLINTS, SPAVINS, WINDPUFFS, 

—and all enlargements, absolutely removed by— 



LAME 



HORSES 



voxCUREQ, 



QUINN'S 

Ointment. 

It has the unqualified endorsement o) our lead- 
ing horsemen and vet erinarians. 

MB. C. E. DiNF.nAKT, Cashier State Bank, 
Slayton, Minn., says: 
"One. bottle cured a very bad case of blond spavin 
on a mare for which I have since been offered iJSHou. 
I would not be without it if it cost *5.ou a bottle." 
We hare h. idredt ofnurh tetlimoniaU. 



Ask your 

end prepaid on 



i-nts 



Price S 1 .30 per Parkairr, Smaller size 5f 
Druggist for it. If he does n t fceep it we will s 
receipt of priee. Address K. tub* A to., nhiieksu, a 



January 13, 1900J 



t&iji? gveevex cuts ^\y*nrt*mcm* 



29 



Beet-Fed Cattle. 



To our fund of knowledwe was added this 
week the information that cattle thrive on 
beets with results highly gratifying to the 
owner of both the beets and the cattle. In 
this valley this year a large acreage of beets 
was allowed to go to waste from the fact that 
the beets were small and tbio, and not worth 
the trouble or expense of harvesting them for 
the sugar factory. From other sources Cash 
Glines learned thit there was nothing better 
for cattle than these same abandoned beet 
fields, and int.) his little patch he turned 
sixty bead of cattle. He noticed that a taste 
for the beets bad to be cultivated, but when 
once the cattle began to eat they did so 
almost to the point of gorging. They first 
ate the tops and when the field was picked 
clean the beets were plowed out and the 
cattle given a free run. Mr. Glines said he 
could almost see them grow, and when shortly 
after he disposed of them he found they had 
increased in good solid weight, and otherwise 
improved in condition so as to secure for him 
the top-notch price. He sold the band to C. 
£. Sherman, who informed him it was the 
nicest lot he bad bought in many a day. John 
Sherman is now feeding a band, and while it 
may be late in the season to offer advice, we 
would say to others: Go thou and do like- 
wise — Santa Maria Graphic. 



For Sale. 



One of the finest BREWSTER VICTORIAS; alio 
elegant Brewster Family Carriage: also one very 
haDdBome Coupe. All In first class condition. 
Apply at 1011 Sutter St... F. S 



Good Ones for Sale. 

15 -HEAD- 15 

Of first-class horses are offered for sale. 
Among them are two well matched 
teams— the finest in the city ; also sev- 
eral fast trotters and pacers, suitable for 
training or fast road work. There are 
among the lot some excellent coupe horses, 
also horses adapted for physicians use. 
These horses are all well broken and 
reliable. They will be sold at reasonable 
prices, and may be seen at the 

DEXTER PRINCE SALE STABLE 

1509 Grove Street near Baker St , 

San Francisco. 



BAYSWATER WILKES 

Sire of KELLY BRIGGS 2:10 1=2. 

Will Make the Season of 1900 at Winters, Yolo Co., Cal. 

SABLE W'LKES 2"18 hi6 sire, is the sire of 32 standard performers, inc'uding Oro Wilkes 
2:11, and is by Guy Wilk s 2:15V, (aire of Fred Kohl 2:07%, Hulda 2:03% and 58 others in 2:30), by 
Geo. Wilkes 2:22, sire of 83 standard performers. 

FANNY B'YSWATER, his dam, is a thoroughbred mare by Bayswater and is the dam of 

Senator L. 2:23V (four mile record 10:12). 

BESSIE SEDGWICK, his second dam, is a thoroughbred mare by Joe Daniels, and the dam of 
BassiP Th >rne 2:22% Third, fourth, filth, sixth, seventh and eighth dims registered in Ameri- 
can Thoroughbred Stud Book. 
Kelly Briggs 2:10U, as a four year old was one of the best winners on the California circuit last year, 

and is theonly one of Bay6water Wilkes' produce ever trained up to that time. 



TERMS FOR SEASON 

(With Usual Return Privileges) 



$40 



Good pasturage at S3 00 per month. All bills due at time of service, but must be paid when mare 
leaves the farm Mares coming from the north or from Sacramento can be Bhipped to Al. Grieves, Davis- 
ville, and will receive prompt attention. Others should be shipped direct to Winters. 

S. H. HOY, Owner, 

Winters, Yolo Co., Cal. 



-r /-\ pi iy 1 lift HOT Come to the office of the Breeder and 

_ Zl _ ~* II H||||Ar" Sportsman, register your wants and place an 

Un wLLL HWIlWb^ advertisement in the columns of the paper. 

By this means you can make a sale or a purchase sooner and with less expense than 
by any other method. 



CLOSING OUT SALE 



■OF ALL THE 



Race Horses in Training 



BELONGING TO- 



J. Naglee Burke, Esq. 

Consisting of 24 Head, including 

Giro, Glissando, Dura, Coda, Dolore, Fura, Gravita, a brother to 
Crescendo, and nine two year olds by imp. Foul Shot (son 
of Musket) Crescendo, Brioso, Drum Major, etc. 

These horses are to be sold without reserve as the owner is 
retiring from racing and intends to engage exclusively in 
the business of holding sales of yearlings every winter. 



•SALE WILL TAKE PLACE AT 



OAKLAND RACE TRACK 

Thursday, January 25th, 1900. 

Commencing at 11:15 o'clock, sharp. 

WM. 0. LAYNQ, Auctioneer. 

Office: 721 Howard St., San Francisco. 
Catalogues ready Wednesday. 

AUCTION SALE 

Tuesday, January 16, 1900, at 11 a. m. 



High Class Trotting Horses 

8ired by SILVER BOW, EASTER WILKES, and other well known stallions, and out of standard 
bred mares. 

The property of Geo, Fox Esq. ot Clements, Cal., and other owners. 

On the same date 25 HEAD of BUSINESS AND DRAFT HORSES 

Wdghlng from 1100 to 18J0 pounds. Well mitched pairs of blacks, greys, dapple greys and bays 

CHASE & MENDENHALL, 

(successors to Kilup & Co.) 
l733 Market St,, cor. Van Ness Avenue. Live Stock Auctioneers 



Do You Want a Camera? 



Takes a Picture 
5 




The Gem Poco 
4 x S 




FOR THREE NEW SUBSCRIBERS TO THE 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE GEM POCO is a 4x5 carrier*, constructed with a universal or fixed 
focus lens that will take a picture clear and sharp at the outer edge as well 
as at the center This was deemed an impossibility until last season, when 
the GEM POCO demonstrated that it could he done. And yet no others 
have succeeded in obtaining this much desired result. 

It is covered with fine Morocco grain leather, has leather handle, two tripod 
plates, and two large brilliant oblong view finders, made in proportion to the 
plate, which insures the correct position of the views. 



It is equipped with a newly discovered fixed focus GEM lens, constructed on 
an entirely new principle, giving a great depth of focus, cutting the plates 
clear and sharp to their full size, together with rotary diaphragm with three 
apertures, Rochester safety shutter arranged for time or instantaeous expos- 
ures, and speed regulator. 

As all working parts are made flush with the camera box, there is no possi- 
bility of their becoming broken or getting out of order. 



Any one sending us three new yearly subscribers, accompanied by the cash ($0.00), will be sent a GEM POCO. 
If you intend to get up a club, send for sample copies, to be used in canvassing, or send us a list of names of people 
you intend to see, and sample copies will be sent to them from this office. BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



22-24 Geary Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



P. S.— The Net Price of This Camera is $5, and Will be Furnished for that Amount in 



^January 13, 190 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training ot 

High-Class Harness 

AND 

Saddle Horses 



HAMBLETONIAN WILKES 

(No. 1679). 



BREED TO A 
GREAT SIRE OF 
RACE HORSES. 



• 

Sire of 

Phoebe Wilkes 2 

Tommy Mc 2 

New Era 2 

Sibyl 3 2 

Salvijie 2: 

Rocker .2: 

Aiime Wilkes ?: 

Aerop'ane 3 

Grand George „2 

J. F Hanson 2 

Brown Bes 2 



:C8' :, 
13 

;17J? 
:V% 

:16^ 
IS 
19^ 

m. 

And 19 others heller than 
2:30. and S producing sons 
and 6 producing daughters. 



• HAMBLETONIAN WILKES, by George Wilk b 2:22, dam 
Mag Lock, by American Star; second dam Lady Irwiu (grandam ot 
Lumps 2:2!). by Hambletonian 10; third dam Daughter ot Roe's Ab- 

| dallah Cbief. 

• SEASON OF 1900 $50. 

I Usual return privi'ege; excellent pasturage and best ot care taken ot 
| mares, 31 per month, at Green Meadow Farm, Address 

R. I. MOORHEAD, 
I Green Meadow Farm, Santa Clara, Cal 



DIRECT 2:051-2 

SIKE OF 

Directum Kelly, 2:08 1-4 
Directly - - - 2:031-4 
Miss Margaret - 2:11 1-2 
Ed B. Young - - 2:11 1-4 
I Direct - - - - 2:13 
Miss Beatrice - 2:13 1-4 
And 13 therSiar.dard Trotters and Pacers 
Terms, $100 ihe Season 

Is now La the stud at HEATING'S STABLKS 
at Pleasanton, California track. 

Excellent pasturage and the best of care laken of 
mares in any manner that owners .may tictire at 
reasonable rales. Apply to 

THOMAS EK EATING, Pleasant in. Ga 




Western Turf Association 

TANFORAN PARK 

Third Meeting from JAN. 1st to JAN- 
20th, 1900, inclusive 

Six high-class running races every week- 
day, rain or shine, beginning at 
1 :30 P. M. 

i The ideal win 'er race track of America. Patrons 
; stepdirectly from the railroad cars into a supeib 
grand itand, glass-enclneed, where comfortably 
housed in bad weather Ihey can enjoy an unob- 
'■ strucied view of the races. 

; Trains leave Third and Towusend streets at 9:00, 
10.40 and li;30 a. M.. and 12:15. 12:'5. U:i0 and 1:25 
p. M , reiurnlug immediately after the last race and 
at 4:15 r. M Rear cars reserved for women and 
their escorts. No Bmoking. Valencia Street 10 
minutes later. 

San Jose and Way Station'. Arrive at 8an 
Bruno at 12:15 p. M. Leave sau Bruno at 4:00 and 
4:45p m. 

R\TE-i-San Francisco to Tanforan and return, 
including admission to track, $1 25. 



W. J. MARTIN, 
President. 



F. H. GREEN, 
Sec'y and M an'gr , 



Alameda Sale and Training Stables, 

Stallions for Service, Season 1900 



I PLEASANTON 

Training Track Association. 



Alameda 

J. M. NELSON 



California. 

Proprietor. 



ALTAMONT 3600 

(By Almont 33. Dam, Sue Ford by 
Brown Chief) 

SIEE OF 

CHEHALIS 8:04 1-4 

DEL NORTE 2:08 

ELLA T 2:08 1-4 

DOC SPEKRY 2:09 

PATH MOST 2:09 1-4 

ALTAO 2:<>9 3-4 

ALAMEDA 2:15 

DECEIVER 2:15 

TOUCIIET _ ..2:15 

CARRIE S 2:17 1-2 

and 31 others in the 2:30 list. : 

Terms for the Season - [$60 

With Usual Return Privileges. 

Good Pasturage at reasonable rates, 
or track. Apply to or address 



ARTHUR W. 2:11 1-2 

Sire WAYLAND W. 2 18 1-2 by Arthur 

Wilkes 2:28 1-2. 
Dim LADT MOOR (dam of Arthur XV. 

2:11 1-2. John A. |8) 
2:14. Maud P. (3) 2:26^ 
trial 2 13 1-2), by 
Grand Moor: aeci.nl 
dam by 1'ln, h'« Glen- 
coe, sun of imp. Glen- 
coe: thiid dam by 
WIlliaiCHOu's Belmont 
Arthur W. is the handsomest horse of his siz j in 
California, being a rich brown seal in color, stand- 
ing 16.? and weighine 1 20n lbs He has been a 
money winner every year of the three he has teen 
campsigned anl during the season of 1899 won two 
first moneys, two seconds, one third and one fourth, 
and reduced his record to l-.Uhi. He will he cam- 
paigned ag in in 19 and will pace in 2:16 sure. 
Consequently be will be limi'ed to 10 approved 
mares. 

Terms for the Season - $40 

With Usual Return Privileges. 

Horses bought, sold and trained for road 



J. M. NELSON. 

Cor. St. Charles St., and Eagle Avenue, 

Alameda, California. 



GAFF TOPSAIL 2A7l> 

Will Make the Season of 1900 at the Vallejo Race Track. 

TERMS $25 FOR THE SEASON 

Only son of Diablo standing for public service in Solano Co. Gaff Topsail is one of the fasten horses 
in the xtate: ts absolnte'y sound and has perfect legs and leet 

tiaff Tops-ail is by Diablo, dam Belle by Alcona 730, son ol Almont 33: second dam Slringham by 
Jim Lick, son of Homer, be by Mambriuo Palchen; third dam by silly Cheatham, thoroughbred. 

Free Purse $250 for Gaff Topsail Three=Year=01ds. 

I will gl . e a purse of H2-.0 entrance fee for foals of 1901 sired by Gall Topsail, mares covered in 1900 to 
be competed for in 1901 at tne Vallejo Race Track. 

EDW. KAVANAGH, Box 366, Vallejo, Cal. 



This track, celehrated all 
over the State as much 
for its splendid condition, 
despite all the changes of 
weather, as for its superb 
climate, has passed into 
new hands. Two hundred 
splendid new box stalls 
have been erected and the 
most thorough system of 
water laid on, conveying 
water to all stalls. The 
track itself has been thor- 
oughly overhauled andput 
in to the best shape pos- 
sible. The association is 
now ready to receive 
horses. 



RENTALS- »2 per month 
Special larte boxes for studs. 

etc., twenty-five feet long, S3 

per month 
Board, etc., for men, *16 per 

mouth 



The following list of horses trained and developed on the track, 
[ together with records obtained, will speak forcibly as to the great 
advantages offered to the patrons of the track, no records over 2:12 

| being included. 

SEARCHLIGIIT, 2:03 1-4. 

ANACONDA, 2:03 1-4. Champion pacing gelding oi the world 

| to date. 

DIRECTLY, 2:03 1-4. Two year old record champion, 2:07^. 
I Ibrce year old record champion, 2:07, 

ALIX, 2:03 3-4. Champion mare, champion race record of the 

world for three heats 2:06l 4 . 2:0% 2:05%. 

FLYING JIB, 2:04. 1 .59^ to pole 

AZOTE, 2:04 3-4. Champion gelding of the world to date. 

DIRECTUM, 2:05 1-4. Champion stallion ot the world to date. 

DIRECT, 2:05 1-2. Champion pacer of bis time 

KLATAWAH, 2:05 1-2. Three year old. 

LENA N., 2:05 1-2. Champion pacing mare of 1898. 

CONK V, 2:07 3-4. 

DIONE, 2:09 1-4. 

DIABLO. 2:09 1-4. Asa four year old. 
CHICKET, 2:10. Record forpacing mare at lhat time. 
LITTLE ALBERT, 2:10. 

SAN PEDRO, 2:10. Winnerof three racesand 16000 in one week. 
GOLD LEAF, 2:11. Champion three year old of ber time. 
VENCS II, 2:11 1-4. 
OWYHEE. 2:11 1-4. 

MONBARS, 2:11 1-4. As a three year old. 
CALYLE CARNE, 2:11 3-4. 

MARGARET S., 8:12. Winner of last Horseman's Great Ex- 
pectation Stakes, $10,000 in coin and a £200 cup. 



Address C B. CHARLESWORTH, Pleasanton, Alameda County, Cal. 



GOOD YOUNG ROADSTERS FOR SALE. 

On account ol the scarcity of cars I find it impos- 
sible to lake all the horses in my string at Gilroy to 
New York, and have a few well broke, sound and 
handsome young roadsters for sale here. For prices 
apply toor call on 15UDD DOBLE, 

Gilroy, Cal, 



For Sale 



Two mares, RUBIE, ch m (4) by Elyria 5729. 
2:25H, son of the great Mambriuo King. JENNIE, 
ch m (11). thoroughbred, by Iutruder. Mares can 
be seen at Palo Alto. 

E. G. DYER, 
Palo Alto, Cal. 



"THE SEARCHLIGHT" 


Capt. Tom Merry 


Thos. B. Murphy 


Compiler of 



Scientific Farrier. 

TROTTINC, ROAD AND PLAIN SHOEINC. 

... 23 Golden Gate Avenue . . . 

Branch Shop— Keating'sTrainingStables, Pleas- 
anton, Cnl. All work guaranteed. 
Telephone Folsom OT1. 

To Horse Owners. 



TABULATED PEDIGREES 

(Thoroughbred Hcrses Only) 

| 

Address 534 1-2 South Spring 8t. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

1 Refers to Hon. Wm. C Whitney, New York: Hon. 
Perry Belmont, New Yoik; James R Keene Esq., 
New York: E. s. Gaidner. Jr.. Sandersviile, Teun. ; 
Wm. Hendrie Esq . HamiltOD.Ont. 



For Sale. 



Millard F. Sanders has located at Pleasanton. „„,„„,>,.,, , , ,„„, 

| The chestnut horse PRIMROSE, foaled 1892, by 
where he will conduct a first class traiuing stable imported St. Blaise, dam Wood Vialet (dam of Sen- 
Gentlemen having colts or horses they wish devel Bland. B weet Violet and Tulals). by Imp 111- 

U ed. Will be sold reasonable or leased to a 
oped for sale or raciug purposes can be accommo- i responsible party. Apply to 
dated. Correspondence solicited. I DAN DENNISON, Iugleside Track. 



January 13, 1900J 



31 



Palace Hotel 
Supper Room 



The moderate charges, de- 
lightful orchestral concerts 
and the undoubted luxury 
are the attributes that make 
the new Supper Room at the 
Palace Hotel the favorite 
place for after theatre parties. 
Open every evening (Sundays 
excepted) from 9:30 to 12 
o'clock. Entrance from main 
office and grand court, 

JOHN C. KIRKPATR1CK, Manager. 



Breeders' Directory. 



HOI. 8 r KINS— Winners ol every 7 days' butter cod 
test at state Fair 1899 lnt A 2nd foraged cows, 4-yr 
3-yr, and 2yr.-olds: 21 Jerseys and Durbarrjs compe 
ling. 5th year my Holstetns Itave beaten Jersexsfor 
butter stock for sale; also pigs. F. H. Burke, 626 
Market St., a. F. 



VKKBA BIK.VV JKR8KY8— The best A. J. O.C 
registered prize herd Is owned by HENRY PIERCE 
san Francisco. Animals for sale. 



JKRHKYS, HOL8TBIIV8 A>" DUKHAM8. 

Dairy Stock specially. Hi gs, Poultry. Established 
1876. William Nllea ,V Co. , Los Angeles, Cal 



W. A. SHIPPER. Avon. Cal., Standard-bred Trot 
ting. Carriage and Koad Horses, Jacks, Mules and 
Durham Bulls tor Sale. 



VETERINARY. 



Books for Stallion Owners. 

1. Hoover' Stallion Service Kecords. 

The most complete book for recording stallion 
service ever placed before breeders. Not a pocket 
edition. No mo-edisputine sires. No more mixing 
of dams where this book is used. There is space fur 
KiO mares, giving their full nreening. desc Iptliiii 
dales of service, dales ol foa ing. with a page for 
tabulating periiaree ol stallion In use, etc.. etc.. » itb 
i idex com p ete. size 10x7'4. Each book is hinrt- 
BomeW and substantially bound Can te used for 
any kind ol pedigreed stock S2 Ou 

2. The Standard Stallion Service Book. 
The greatest Service Boik published, containing 

space for eutering .00 mares, giving spice tor full 
description, pedigree, date of seivictsand refusals 
date of foaling, etc., with in"ex Complete, nentlv 
bound in leatherette, suitable for pocket use. Can 
b3 used for any kiud of p digreed slock $1 0. 

3. Breeder's Note and Certificate Book. 
This book contains 7.5 blank certificates to be 

giveu to owners of mares, certifying that said mare 
haB been bred to a certain stallion. Also 75 notes 
suitable for owner of maregivii g to owner ot stallion 
on account oi stallion service fee. This book is well 
hound, and has st'ibs lor both the notes and cer 
tificaies. Can be used tor any kind of pedigreed 
stock _ 81 00 

4. Stock Farm Record Book. 

FOR EVERY HORSE OWNER. 

It i< all its name implies. Contains space for en 
tering full description and of every aulmal on the 
farm, etc. 100 pages. Every farm Bhouid have 
one fl 00 

5. The Horseman's Handbook. 

Contents— Care and management of stallions; 
care and man-gemeut of broodmares; care, break- 
ing and devel' ping of colts; care handling and 
management of campaigners: care of the feet; shoe- 
ing and booting; care of horses in Bickness; rules of 
the American trotting lurf; betting rules: rules fo 
laying out track, etc.. etc 81 00 

ALL FIVE TO ONK ADDRESS FOK »5. 
Sent prepaid on receipt of price. Address: 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Sulkies Built to Order! 

REPAIRED and CONVERTED. 

Lined up to run perfect when strapped to 
horse. 

OUB SPECIALTY 

^SULKIES TO RENT^ 

We buy and sell Second hand Sulkies. 
W J. KKNNEY, Rlkeman, 

Wl Valencia St.. near lfiTh 



Mark Levy 

Fashionable Tailor 

For Quality, Style, Fit and Excellent work un 
surpassed. 

22 1-2 Geary St., San Francisco. 
Prices reasonable. Room 20. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Ca rria?c.Sadd Ic and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and Stable: 60a Golden (late Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



I>r. w m. F"~ Egan 

M. K. O. V. 8., F. K. V. M.S. 

V K T K II I * A It V S LRU BOX. 

la ember ot the Royal College ot Veterinary 8ur 
<eons, England ; Fellow of the Edlaburg Veterlnarj 
Medical Suclety; Graduate of the New Veterinary 
College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Surgeon to the a. F. 
Fire Department; Live Slock Inspector lor New Zea- 
land and Australian Colonies at the port ot San 
Francisco; Professor of Equine Medicine, Veterinary 
Surgery, Veterinary Department University of 
California; Ex President ot the California State Vet- 
erinary Medical Association; Veterinary Infirmary, 
Residence and Office. San Francisco Veterinary Hos- 
pital 111" Golden Gate Avenue, near Webster St.. San 
Kranclsco: Telephone West 128. 




O'BrilEN & SONS, Agents, 

San Francisco, CaL 



The largest and best located sales pavilioii 
on the Pacific Coast ! 



Occidental Horse Exchange 

721 HOWARD STREET, 



Near Third 



San Francisco. 



Having fitted up the abo?e place especially for 
the sale of harness horses, vehicles, harness, etc., it 
will afford me pleasure to correspond wiih owners 
regarding the Auction Sales which I shall hole 1 
at this place EVERY TUESDAY at 11 a. m 
Arrangements can be made for special sales ot 
standard bred trottiDg stock, thoroughbreds, etc. 
My turf library is the largest on this Coast, hence 
lam prepared to compile catalogues satisfactorily 
to my patrons. I take pleasure in referring to any 
and all for whom I have sold horses during the past 
two years. WM. G. LAYNG, 

Live Stock Auctioneer. 

Telephone Main S179. 



SMITHS 

CASH STORE 

Th- <>ri i al reliable and largest mail order house. 
Ask lor Catalogue, free 

25-27 Market St., near the Kerry. 



Cocoanut Oil Cake. 

THE BEST FEED FOR STOCK, 
CHICKENS AND PIOS 

For Bale In lots to Bull by 
EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO, 
20K California St., s»n Pranclaoo, Cxi. 



RFD BALL 

San Francisco Agent: A. N. 



BRAND 

GRANT, 17 Golden 



I \wtrder1 liold Medal 
At California M»te 
Knlr 1*«2. 

-very imrn** owner 
who values his at- ck 
Uhoul'l constantly have 
t supply of It on 1 and. 
ft ImprovpR and keeim 
took in the pli.k of con- 
dition. 

'Manhattan Food Go. 



Man Mateo. f!»l. 
Afclc your grocers or walni* lor It 



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|>LEASANTON TRACK, where so many champions 
■ were bred and prepared for their battles on the 
turf has undergone a wonderful change. The old stalls 
have given way to modern structures and the newly 
whitewashed stables laid out in regular blocks present 
a neater and handsomer appearance than the old 
"shacks" wherein were once housed Director, Azote, 
Directum, Flying Jib, Direct and many others of the 
trotting and pacing kings. The change is great and the 
visitor who views the present cannot suppress a sigh 
for the glories of the past, though he knows that for 
every former champion there will be another to occupy 
his place It is too early in the season for speed and 



when on Saturday last a representative of the Breeder 
and Sportsman visited this celebrated training ground 
it was more with the idea of ascertaining what was to 
be done than to see what was doing The day was not 
a bright one. Clouds or a high fog obscured the sun, 
and the air was co 1, but from valley center to mountain 
top the greenest grasses completely hid the ground, pre- 
saging luxuriant feed for the mares whose colts but 
lately weaned or yet unborn, will be the champion 
trotters of future years. In the great economy of nature 
there is a special spot provided for the perfect develop- 
ment of every animal, and Alameda county, or rather 
that portion of it within a radius of twenty miles of 



I'leasanton, was designed accidentally or intentionall 
as the place where the most perfect harness horse can be 
bred, reared and trained for his life work Nature has 
supplied all the facilities, and it has only remained for 
man to make the proper use of them. The climate and 
the natural feed are the best in the world while the soil 
has such elasticity that growing muscles, bones and 
ligaments are not injured by any reasonable work upon 
the perfect Pleasanton track. The.' corporation which 
now controls this property has provided 200 large, 
roomy box stalls, erected two immense water tanks, 
piped the water to all parts of the grounds and is keep- 
(Continued on Page 87.) 



34 



.January 20, 1900 



BAYSWATER WILKES. 



A Promising Young Stallion With Producing 
Thoroughbred Blood Close Up. 



When during the limited harness racing season of 1899, in 
California, the green pacer Kelly Briggs came out and won 
his first race in the fast time of 2:10.1 and 2:11}, and closed 
the season with a record of three winning races, one second 
and one third money out of a to'al of five starts, with a total 
of $1900 to his credit, attention was not only directed to him 
as one of the best young horses of the year, but inquiry be. 
gan to be made about his sire Bayswater Wilkes, whose pedi- 
gree is as follows : 



jg ("Sable Wilkes. 

M 

•J 

> 



Guy Wilkes.. 



I Sable.. 



Geo. Wilkes 

Lady Bunker by 

Mambriuo Patchen 

( The Moor 

( Gretchen by Mamb. Pilot 



( Bayswater.. 



Fanny Bayswater. 



[ Bessie Sedgwick.. j 



i Lexington 

t Bay Leaf by 

imp. Yorkshire 

Joe Daniels 

Miuuie Smith by 

Starlight 



Bayswater Wilkes is a young horee, having been foaled in 
1891, at Brookside Farm, near Mountain View, the property 
of N. J. Stone. He was sold at auction as a yearling and 
purchased by his present owner, Mr S. H. Hoy, of Winters, 
Yolo county. Mr. Hoy trained him in his three year old 
form and trotted him a mile in 2:20 without putting him to 
his utmost speed, but while exercising the horse on the Sac- 
ramento track happened to be so unfortunate as to ccme into 
collision with a bicycle rider and there was a wrecked 
bicycle, and a badly cut up horse in consequence. Owing to 
this accident Bayswater Wilkes was thrown out cf training 
and has never been raced, but he could now step a mile in bet- 
ter than 2 :20 at any time if given preparation. In the stud he 
has had the most limited opportunities and has probably 
been bred to not over fifty mares all told and while the pro- 
duce of these mares all show speed on the road, Kelly Briggs 
is the only one that was ever trained for a race. There are a 
few of his two and three year olds that will be worked this 
year, however, and they are all a credit to their sire. 

The blood lines of Bayswater Wilkes are rich in racing 
blood. On the upper half of the tabulation his sire, Sable 
Wilkes 2:18, was a race horse, and is the sire of 32 standard 
performers; his grandsire, Guy Wilkes 2:15 J, was also a 
race horse and is the sire of 60 with standard records; bis 
great grandsire, Oeo. Wilkes 2:22, was the greatest race 
horse of his day, sired 83 with standard records and founded 
the greatest of the trotting families. The dam of Sable 
Wilkes is Sable by The Moor, and she is the dam of Sable 
Wilkes 2:18, Ulee Wilkes 2:23, Burlingame 2:18$ and Leo 
Wilkes 2:29$, and one of the few mares that have produced 
four standard trotters. The sire of Sable was The Moor, the 
sire of Sultan and Beautiful Bells, the greatest of broodmares. 
Sable's dam was the great broodmare Qretchen, dam of five 
standard performers, and Oretchen was aired by Mambrino 
Pilot, that had a record of 2:27-1 under saddle, and was by 
the great Mambrino Chief 11. He was not only a producer, 
but his sons and daughters also produced speed at the trot. 

Guy Wilkes 2:15$, sire of Sable Wilkes, is one of the 
greatest sons of Qeo. Wilkes. He has 00 in the 2:30 list, the 
fastest two being Fred Kohl 2:07$ and flulda 2:08J. Twenty 
of his sons are producers and twelve of his daughters are the 
dams of standard trotters. His dam Lady Bunker, by 
Mambrino Patchen, also produced William L„ the sire of 
Axtell. Four of her sons are producing sires and two 
have records. So much for the top crosses; now let us look 
at Bayswater Wilkes' blood lines on bis dam's side. 

His dam is Fanny Bayswater, a strictly thoroughbred 
mare by Bayswater, son of the mighty Lexington and Bay 
Leaf, by imported Yorkshire. Fannie Bayswater was bred 
by the late David S. Terry and was mated with trotting bred 
stallions. To the cover of Dexter Prince she produced 
Senator L., a trotter that won hard races, took a record of 
2:23$ and since 1894 has held the four mile trotting record of 
America 10:12. Fannie Bayswater also pro luced Bayswater 
Wilkes (trial 2:20) and sire of Kelly Briggs 2:10* The dim 
of Fannie Bayswater was Bessie Sedgwick, by the great four 
mile race horse and sire Joe Daniels, out of Minnie Smith by 
Starlight, son of Owen Dale, next dam the famous Fannie 
Howard by Illinois Medoc Bessie Sedgwick was herself the 
dam of a standard trotter, she having produced Bessie Thome 
2:22}, a good mare that, like Senator L , never found the 
route too far or the heats too many. It will thus be seen 
that Bayswater Wilkes has a wonderful pedigree. Every 
trotting bred sire in the above tabulation has a 
race record and is a producer. Every trotting bred dam 
therein is in the great broodmare list. Every thoroughbred 
sire given is the sire of winners, and every thoroughbred 
dam is the dam of winners, either runners or trot- 
ters as follows : Fannie Bayswater is the dam of 
Senator L. 2:23$; Bessie Sedgwick is the dam of Bessie 
Thome 2:221; Bay Leaf is the dam of Bayonet, Baywood, 



Preakness and Bay flower, who was the grandam of Bramble 
and other good race horses, and Minnie Smith threw winners 
of races. The thoroughbred close up in a trotter's pedigree 
has been considered a great desideratum by the most success- 
ful breeders, and when that thoroughbred blood not only has 
the four mile winning quality but has shown its ability to 
produce speed at the trot and a four mile trotting champion, 
it is certainly of the very choicest strains. Bayswater Wilkes 
is a grand individual in addition to being magnificently bred, 
and the first of his produce to be trained having taken a 
record of 2:10} in his first race, and stood among the best 
money winners of the year, he is indeed one of California s 
most promising young sires. 



Two Associations Combine. 



The Retirement of J. Naglee Burk. 



While it is greatly to be deplored that such a prominent 
and ic fluential patron of racing as Mr. J. Naglee Burk is to 
retire from the list of winning owners and is henceforth to 
be only identified as a breeder of high class thoroughbreds, 
there is this consolation that seekers after first-class money- 
winning racing material will have an opportunity of reaping 
the golden harvest which be has so successfully sown. The 
amruot of money and time be has devoted to an intelligent 
and comprehensive study cf the entrancing subject cf race- 
horse breeding cannot be computed. His library contains 
the most valuable books of reference on this subject that 
money could buy and the results of the labor spent in study- 
ing these works and putting into practice the theories of the 
ablest minds in Europe and America prove that he has not 
worked in vain. Breeding, individuality and hereditary 
soundness were requisites he insisted upon when purchasing 
hiB broodmares, ard the twenty-five descetdants of these 
matrons which will be led we might say from tbe saddling 
paddock (all ready to race) into the salesring next Thursday 
morning, will cause every horseman present to exclaim : "No 
finer looking ones were ever offered before." There may be 
some who will doubt this gentleman's retirement from the 
turf when these are offered; to these we will say that afier the 
sale, or at any time previous t ereto, all the saddles, 
blankets and stable paraphernalia will be sold at low figures 
for whatever they will bring. 

Such famous race horses as Cods, Giro, Gusto, E«pirando, 
Grszia, Gravita, Garbo, Festoso, Fiero, Furia, Dolore, Gliss- 
aodo, Fuga, Giacoso, Gaio and nine others unnamed, foals 
of 1898 by such sires as Flambeau (one of these is out of 
imp Janet N, bence a full brothtr to tbe mighty Crescendo 
and horsemen claim bis equal in individuality), Drum Major, 
one cf the handsomest race horses ever brought to Califor- 
nia; he is also "bred in the purple." His sire was Punster, 
the crack two year old of the Middle West, and his dam was 
Pearl Tyler, she by fccratch (sire of Helen Scratch, dam of 
Braw 8cot, Braw Lass, etc.); second dam Mary Minor by 
Planet; third dam Nannie Harper, a famous daughter of 
imp. Glencoe, etc.; Crescendo by Flambeau, out of Janet 
N., one of the greatest horses of his day and his dam is one 
of the most famous broodmares in America. Everyone re- 
members Crescendo, his career in California fills a large and 
important chapter iff our turf annals. Brioso is another 
race horse and sire represented. He was also by Flambeau 
out of By Holly's famous race mare and Cup winner Irish 
Lass by imp. Kyrle Daly. Thesz two year olds ark 
kfady TO start now ! They are waiting to be ridden up 
to the barrier and will catch the judge's eye before their 
competitors get within a length of them. They are bred for 
speed and staying qualities. The older division includes 
Giro, Glissando, Coda, Dolore, Espirando, Furia and others 
y*ho are getting inside the money everyday; in fact, they are 
ready made race horses and a man don't have to wait three 
months to get his money out of them. They are sired by 
imported Foul Shot, the son of the immortal sire Musket, 
which Mr. Barney Scbreiber, Jos. Cairn Simpson and every 
horseman who has seen bim declares to be one of the finest 
formed horses ever landed in America; imported Brutus, 
that great sire of speed and gameoess, Flambeau, Wildidle t 
imported Cyrus, St. Saviour and Brioso. 

The sale is attracting a great deal of attention from the 
fact that everyone ottered is out of a famous race mare and is 
bred from the stoutest and speediest lines. After their rac- 
ing days are ended they will be invaluable in the stud and 
harem. 

The sale will take place next Thursday, at the Oakland 
race track. Catalogues are issu r d and can be obtained at 
this office or from the auctioneer, Wm. G. Layng, office 721 
Howard street. 

An offer of $15,000 is reported to have been refused last 
week for the bay filly Nirvana by Directum 2:05$, out of a 
daughter of Favorite Wilkes 2:25$. The promising young 
trotter is owned by Dr. J. C. McCoy, of Kirkwood, Del., 
who bought and sold Boralma 2:13 on the eve of his winning 
race for the Kentucky Futurity last fall. The offer is said 
to have come from Thomas W. Lawson, the Boston horse 
fancier who bought Boralma from Dr. McCoy for $18,000. 
Nirvana finished a close second to Endow when the great 
two year old trotted in 2:14$ in the second heat of tbe race 
for tbe Le ington purse at tbe Kentucky Breeders meeting- 
She is without a record and is looked upon by many horse- 
men as being tbe best three year old trotter now in sight. 



New York, Jan. 11. — After thirteen years of hostility 
and warfare, which operated to tbe detriment of each other 
and of the trotting-horse interest in general, representatives 
of the Natioaal Trotting Association and the American Trot- 
ting Association signed a treaty of peace at the Murray Hill 
hotel to-day, which virtually reunites the two rival organi- 
zations, and makes them to all intents and purposes one as- 
sociation, with two central offices and two sets of officials. 

This important move on the checkerboard ol turf politics 
was quite unexpected, as few persons were aware that any 
overtures had been made in this direction. According to 
the compact which was signed, sealed and delivered to-day, 
each association is bound to recognize and enforce all fines 
and penalties imposed by tbe other, the same as if imposed 
by its own officials. The treaty of peace also provides, in 
effect that hereafter no member of either association can 
withdraw from one and join the other body whenever a 
diflerence arises between the members and the great parent 
or central organization. 

The roll of each association for the year 1899 is agreed 
upon as tbe permanent basis of membership, and all driving 
clubs now on the roll of either the N. T. A. or A. T. A. 
must stay there or else become non-association tracKs, for 
there can be no more shifting as in the times past. There is 
nothing in tbe compact, however, to prevent any driving 
ciub from becoming a member of both the N. T. A. and 
A. T. A. 

Although nothing of the sort appears on tbe surface, it is 
said that this last provision grew out of some rather high- 
handed and defiant actions on tbe part of the N. T. A. mem- 
ber at Louisville last year. It will be remembered that the 
Board of Review of the N. T. A. imposed a fine of $650 
against said member in that case of refusing to report and 
collect penalties imposed by tbe judges of the races there 
in 1898. 

Tbe president, secretary, and all other officials of tbe 
L-juisville club were also suspended until they comply with 
the ruling of tbe Board of Review. As matters stood before 
the New York conference, and before the treaty of peace was 
signed, it would have been possible for tbe Louisville club lo 
withdraw from the N. T. A. and join the A. T. A. and go on 
racing as before. Indeed this was the program which most 
horsemen expected to see carried out. But some of the high 
officials of the A. T A as well as the N. T. A , happened to 
have a grievance against Louisville, for that club had stepped 
in and named the dates belonging to tbe Terre Haute club, 
of which W. P. Ij«ms, the president of the A. T. A. is the 
leading spirit and exclusive head. 

In order to avoid a clash with Louisville last year Terre 
Haute was compelled to surrender the position in the circuit 
which it has held for many years and be content with what 
was left after the Kentucky club had chosen its dates. There 
was hard feeling on account of tbe episode, and Ijams and 
his friends, who control the A. T. A. were not slow, accord- 
ing to the gossips, in embracing the present opportunity to 
square accounts with Louisville. 



Wealth and Heart Both 



The will of D. E. Knight, the Marysville capitalist, has 
been filed for probate in tbe Superior Court of Yuba county, 
and it offers proof of the fact that occasionally there is to be 
found a man of wealth who is also a man of heart. Knight 
acquired vast wealth through his connection with large and 
varied interests in and about Marysville. His will shows 
that he had not forgotten the laborers, whose toil aided him 
in bis accumulations, or who performed for him some remem- 
bered service. 

To the gas-fitter of the Marysville Coal Gas Company, the 
Marysville capitalist leaves twenty-five shares of stock in 
that corporation; and an equal number of shares to the elec- 
tric light workman, and to each of the two firemen; also 
twenty-five shares to tbe secretary of the company. To the 
girl wbo had been employed for several years in bis family 
be makes a handsome bequest; to thestreet-car diiver on the 
Marysville and Yuba Street Railway Company twenty-five 
shares of stock in that corporation; and to each of the 
Protestant and Catholic relief societies of the town a sub- 
stantial legacy. 

Some employers regard their men as machines, from 
whom so much is expected in return for so much pay. The 
employe may go ever so far beyond the mere performance cf 
his duties, and render services prompted, by the highest sen. 
timents of loyalty and friendship, but the service is received 
with the cold-blouded reflection that that is what the man 
is hired for. Once his usefulness begins to show a waning 
sign, all his past services, his loyalty and faithfulness are 
forgotten. 

Knight was a shrewd business man, an exacting employer. 
He worked hard himself, and he expected those to whom 
he paid salaries to give full return for their pay. But he 
also had an appreciation for that class of service for which 
mere salaries do not compensate — tbe kind that comes from 
loyal friendship. Such friendship Knight apparently had 
formed among the laborers at the gas works and on the car 
line — and it must be pleasant to know that he remembered 
them in his last will. Tbe incident has an interest outside 
the town of Marysville, in proving that wealth does not 
always dull the hearts of its possessors to the better senti- 
ments of life. — Sacramento Bee. 



January 20, 1900] 



35 



THE B0LIP3E MALE LINE. 



Statistics of 1899 Show It to Be in the 
Lead. 



The question of the superiority of the male Hoes of 
Eclipse, Hercd and Matched is once more to the fore, if in- 
deed, it mar be said to have ever been telegated to anything 
like the background. However much these discussions may 
at times stray frcm the true path, which I lake to be that of 
genuine benefit to the, thoroughbred racehorse, they are un- 
deniably interesting, not to say important, and it certainly 
behooves the breeder, owner and general racegoer to keep in 
some sort cf touch with this, as, in fact, all matters of a 
similar nature. 

With the English fiat racing season concluded some weeks 
since, and with the entire racing on the "light little isle" 
embraced in a comparatively small area and under one con- 
trol, its statistics have new been thoroughly compiled. The 
tt.il male question shows, as usual, an overwhelmirg aggre- 
gate of winnings for the house of Eclipse. 

"Tail male," I may venture to explain for the sake of 
some readers to whom the term may perchance be unin- 
telligibly technical, implies the tracing of a horse's descent 
through the direct line of his sire's male ancestry until we 
reach one of the great trio, Eclipse, Herod and Matchem, 
who were respectively foaled in England in 1764, 1751 and 
1748. Let me illustrate by a reference to well known Ameri- 
can stallions. In the case of Hanover, for instance, his sire, 
Hindoo, wrs a boh of Virgil, he by Vandal, he by Glenccfi 
he by Sultan, he by Selim, he by Buzzard, he by Wocd- 
pecker, this latter horse being a son of Herod. Hence, Han- 
over (sire of Hamburg, Ben Holladay, etc ) is a "tail male" 
descendant of Herod. In the case cf Kingstoj, we find his 
sire, Spendthrift, to be by Australian, he by West Australia^ 
he by Melbourne, he by Humphrev Clinker, he by Comas, 
be by Sorcerer, be bv Trumpalor, he by Conductor, this 
latter horse being a son of Matchem. Hence, Kirgston (sire 
of King's Courier, Vulcain, etc.) is a "tail male" descendant 
of Matchem. In the case cf imp. Albert, we find his sire 
Albert Victor, to be by Marsyas, he by Oilacdo, be by 
Touchstone, he by Camel, he by Whalebone, he by Waxy 
he by Pot 8 o's, this latter horse being a sun cf Eclips«.' 
Hence, Albert (sire cf Mesmerist, Maribert, etc ) is a "taij 
male" descendant of Eclipse. 

RESULTS IN iNGLAND. 

As I have said, tail male statistics show an overwhelming 
aggregate of winnings for Eclipse in England. Oar cousins 
have really built up their thoroughbred by persistent patron- 
age of Eclipse blood, not only in "tail male," but also in the 
general strength of the pedigree. This is best shewn in the 
book, "Modern Pedigrees," both of whose authors, "Ant. 
werp" and "Lamplightei," I regret to have to a d, have 
now gone over to the great majority. Not attempting to 
deal at this time with the "Mcdern Pedigrees" matter, It t 
us revert to the tail male statistics of the English racing of 
1893 as we find them annexed to Bruce Lowe's book. The 
results then were: 

Winners Races Woo Value 

Eclipse 709 1.298 £384,197 

Herod 85 146 33.260 

Matcbem 41 78 19,ll« 

Total 835 1 ,522 £436,693 

Such a triumph as this is for Eclipse iB beyond all possi- 
bility of equivocation. Be it borne in mind that it was no 
extraordinary outcome of affairs, but the ineyitaple result of 
the tenacious adherence to the Eclipse line, which has be- 
come so inseparable from the policy of our English cousins, 
whose breeding policy, aj I hive so often written, is the very 
best extant and should be seriously studied and imitated by 
the world at large 

Let us now look at the results fir 1899 : 

Winners Ka?es Won Value 

Eclipse 864 1,464 £434,605 

Herod 61 100 22,327 

Matchem 42 74 16.377 

Total 967 1,638 £473,309 

It takes but a glance to realize that Eclipse is not only 
holding bis own, but also is actually drawing away some- 
what. To analjzs the results, it may be noted that the great 
Eclipse lines of Whalebone are led by Stockwell with 
£138,705. while Newminster follows with £102,820. Ster- 
ling credits the Whalebone branch with £22,3o7. In recent 
years these three branches have been away in the lead' 
Another Richmond took (he field in this department in 
1899, however, for Whalebone developed a revived and im- 
portant strength through the bouse of Faugh-a-Ballagh 
(represented by our own Sensation, Locohatchee atd Kiley) 
with a total of £24,402, or slightly in excets cf Sterling's 
showing. The Orlando branch earned £13 546, and Rata, 
plan scored £7,391, while the revived , Musket line retted 
£3,613 for (he Touchstone branch of Whalebone, and it is 
quite likely to do considerably better in future. The full 
credit of the Whalebone family, I may add, is £318,410, or, 
in othei words, three-quarters of Eclipse's total. 

The Blacklock line of Eclipee has gained notably since 
1893, Then its total was £69,988, while in 1899 it earned 
£96,873. Of this amount Galopin and bis descendants con" 
tributed £73,687, while $23,071 came through the line o[ 
Speculum. The Tramp line of Eclipse has made a sligh 
advance, mainly by reason of the winnings of the get of our 



own Pontiac, and is credited with $12 897. The Whisker 
line of Eclipse netted $6325, of which £3428 was contributed 
by the house of King Tom. To summarize the strength of 
Eclipse the following totals will doubtless serve at a glance 
as also to more clearly demonstrate the relative deductions: 

Wha'ebone £318,410 

Blacklock 96 873 

Tramp 12,997 

Whisker 6.235 

The house of Herod is, like Eclipse, represented by four 
great branches, of which the lice of Ion, through Wild Day- 
rell, earns £?0,737 through Buccaneer, and £1399 through 
The Rake. The line of Partisan, through Gladiator, has a 
total of £7950, virtually all of which comes through Sweet- 
meat. The line of Diomed, through Lexington, earned 
£1129, while Selim's line earned £711 through Pantaloon 
and £399 through Virgil, this latter amount being furnished 
by Hindoo's £167 and Hanover's £132. The figure to 
Hanover's credit is in ((range contrast to bis customary 
achievements in America, but it must be borne in mind that 
comparatively few of his get bave ever raced in England. I 1 
is true that several of his yearlings were exported by Mr. 
Croker in 1895, and on the whole ther made a disappointing 
showing. One, Roman Chief, won a number of fair races, 
however, showing a liking for a distance. The Castrel lino 
through Pantaloon, credited Herod with £711. 

Matcbem's £16,377 was entirely furnished by the Solon 
branch, through which alone it still lives. Barcaldine's line 
won £8909, Arbitrator's £5150, Young Melbourne's £1818 
and Mentmore's £500. 

SOME RESULTS IN AMERICA. 

Inasmuch as this country has been regarded as the hotbed, 
so to speak, of Hen diem, it may possibly have suggested 
itself to many, while reading the above, that our results 
would reverse the English indications. And this though' 
would be especially pardonable in view of the fact that a 
Herod horse, none other than Hanover, led the list of win- 
ning sires for teveral seasons past. The result, however, is 
distinctly in favor of Eclipse, although in hardly so over- 
whelming proportion as in England. In 1899, figures not 
being attainable, I turn to the previous year. Not attempt- 
ing to run out the full results of 1898, 1 have contented my- 
self with noting the comparison between the leading stallions. 
There were, it appears, thirty-six horses whose get placed 
more than $20,000 to the credit of each stallion, and the 
aggregate winnings of these stallions amounted to $1,413,080. 
Despite the fact that Hanover's total was $120,094, or Over 
$30,000 more than his runner up, we find that only four 
other Herod horses managed to finish in the $20,000 division, 
contributirg among them $130,535 to complete Herod's total 
of $260 629. As to Matcbem's line, only three stallions 
qualified in the $20,000 division, their total aggregating 
$83,585. As against these figures, we now have to notice 
that all the remaining twenty-eight winners of $20,000 or 
over traced to Eclipse, their total being the very handsome 
sum of $1,008,366. To epitomiza the records of theses 
thirty-six leading stallions of 1898, we have only to set the 
result out as follows: 

Eclipse 11,078.366 

Herod 250,629 

Matcbem 83,858 

The records of our American classic races bear out the 
Eclipse domination. In working out a tap root table of 
twenty-one cf our classic races for Mr. W. Allison's forth- 
coming book, I also calculated the tail male descent of the 
winner of each year's renewal. The result: 

Eclipse 290 

Herod 129 

Matchem 37 

THOUOBT8 OF THE FUTURE. 

It would be very easy to make a false decuctions or a series 
of false deductions from all this. The principal error would 
be to promptly conclude (hat an Eclipse-line stallion is in- 
variably preferable lo one tracing to either Herod or 
Matchem. It needs no records of mine to prove (hat such a 
deduction would be arrant nonsense. Hanover and Spend- 
thrift have abundantly demonstrated (he ability < f the Herod 
and Matchem tail male lines 10 keep their heads above 
water, so to epeak. Hanover having certainly kept his own 
very much in evidence, while Spendthrift has furninhed us 
with a son whose get have in their turn accomplished re- 
markable results in their first two seasons. Verily a man 
would approach the depth af folly to send his mares to some 
comparatively "no account" Eclipse horse just because he is 
an Eclipse, at the same lime ignoring some thoroughly 
grand horse jwt because he happens (o come from either 
Herod or Matchem. In the cases of equal merits as to indi- 
viduality it may he well to prefer Eclipse for its own sake. 
But no hori-e who has proven himself to be a bad racehorse 
or a failure as a sire is deaerving of patronage just because 
he is of the male line of Eclipse. The percentage of re- 
sults stroDgly points to Eclipse uuder equal conditions, but 
not necessarily otherwise. 

This is all, of course, with reference to the present and 
immediate future. What the eventual results of another 
century will be becomes quite another matter, although, 
judging from the past, it is quite likely that in England the 
male lines of Herod and Matchem will have virtually ceased 
to exist. Eclipse certainly gains ground yearly, and natur- 
ally the tendepcy is to patronize his line to the increasing 
neglect of the others. I have often wished, however, that 



eucha Herod or Matcbem horse as Hanover or Spendthrif 
had been given a chance in Eogland. 

No one can pretend that the Eclipse line furnishes a very 
great nisjoritv of the best sires the world over. Hence it is 
all the more regrettable that a Hanover or a Spendthrift was 
not given a chance in the genuine strorghold of the thor- 
oughbred. Of course, all hope of this is now past Han- 
over is gone, and Spendthtift will almost certainly spend 
his remaining years here. However strong the numerical 
preponderance of Eclipse horses, the Glencoe and Australian 
lines of Herod and Matchem are hardly likely lo be obliter- 
ated from our land during the lifetime of any reader of this 
article, although I have no doubt that the balance of totals 
will continue in favor of Eclipse, whose many male lines o' 
strength necessarily have the very few lines of Herod and 
Malcoem at a genuine disadvantage as regards actual results 

The question seems to sum itpelf up into the deductions 
that the percentage of results is considerably indicative of 
Eclipse superoiity, and (ha( only in very exceptional cases 
are Herod or Matchem equal to him. And for evenlua 
purposes it will almost certainly be demonstrated tha 
neither ia ever his superior. — W. H. Rowe in N. Y. Tele- 
graph. 



The list of winning owners at the Crescent City Jockey 
Club meeting thus far presents many interesting features. 
Up to January 6.h no less than 133 different interests had a 
balance to their credit on the association's books. Some of 
them had won only comparatively trifling small amounts, to 
be sure, hut it shows thai the money ia being well distributed. 
I). W. Kelly & Co , the Texas firm, are at the head of the 
list with a total of $2235. L V. Bellow is second with 
$1981 to hie credit, while J. H. Smith figures third with 
$1896. J. J. McCsflerly, despite the fact that the majority 
of bis string has not been in the best of shape, has succeeded 
in annexing $1827. Erank Regan, who usually pulls down 
his share of the plums at this meeting, has hardly struck 
bis stride yet, hut withal that he is not so far behind the 
leaders, with $1666. Boland, whoBe work in the saddle 
under the sage guidance of McCafferty has been a revelation, 
heads the list of winning j lckeys by a comfortable margin. 
Mitchell is Boland's nearest competitor, but the former has 
had he greater number of mounts, and hia work has not 
been 1 early as good. Wedderstrand, though a poor third on 
the list as far as winning mounts are concerned, has im- 
proved wonderfully and gives promise of becoming one of 
the best lightweight jockeys in the country. Thirty-seven 
boys bave scored brackets. 



The following odds have been posted in the Kentucky 
Derby: Lieutenant Gibson, 4 to 1 ; David Garrick, 8; 8am 
Phillips, 8; Prince of Melbourne, 10; F. W. Brode, 12; War- 
ing, McMeekin and Kentucky Farmer, 15 each; His Ex- 
cellency, Kentucky Lamplighter, Edinburgh and the Cham- 
berlain, 20 each; Flaunt, Lew Craft and John Grigsby, 25 
each; Thrive, Florizar, Caviar, Highland Lad, Little 8moke, 
Strathlight, First 8hot and Troxier, 50 each; others from 100 
to 200 The long price against David Garrick is laid by 
rtason of the fact that it is almost a certainty that he will 
not be sent west 10 compete for (be big prize. 



The thrilling reports about Keenan undergoing treatment 
for laminitia and being absolutely out of the Cup have turned 
out all moonshine. The horse has been out doing slow work 
and although he seemed to be going a bit tender, due, as 
current reports now go, to a bruised foot, there was not much 
laminitis about him. He is looking very bright and well, 
and behaved like a gentleman 'on the course, a different 
state of affairs to last year. — The Asian. 



Kendall's Spavin Oure. 



Glens Falls, Warren Co., X. Y., March 29, '97. 
I)b. B. J. Kendall Co. 

Having mod your Kendall's Hpavin Cure with good success on both 
Spavin anil Splint, loan cheerfully recommend it asdoln(jall 
that ia claimed for it. 1 would not bi> without It so long as I have a 
horse, lor I find it good for so many ailments which a DOM la apt to 
have. Picase send me your book, A Treatise on the Home and bis 
Diseases and oblige, M11.0 P. Mfford. 



Horso Owners Should Use 
GOMBAULT'S 

Caustic 
Balsam 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy. 

A SAFE, SPEEDY AND 
POSITIVE CURE. 



1 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OR FIRING 

Impossible to produce any srar or htrmish. The) 
e.if.-Rt heat Blister •vet mad. Xakaa the plaoa 

of nil linfmenU for mild or eovi-ro action. Remove* 
all llunchon or BlomUhoH from Moreen or Cuttle. 

An n HUMAN REMEDY for Rheumatls n. 
Sprains, Sore Throat, Etc., HUiuvuiuuble. 

UIC PllaDaUTCC that nnn ti hleeponnfnl of 

Wb uUAnANItt caustv balsam win 

produce more nctunl roKult« thnu 'whole bottle of 
any liniment or spaviD cure mUto over mude. 
Every bottlo of Caustic Bdtaam »old U Wati-alir 

ted to Klvenfttlnfnction. Prlcp 11 .50 per bottle. Holrl 
by dnmeistn. or nent byexproH clmn:"" paid, with full 
dlroctionn for ''1 u " Bend lor do»«'rlptlve circ Unra, 
teHtimoninle, eto^Addrens ^ 
TnELAWItENOE-WILLIAMa CO.. iMevelend. Ohio 



36 



t&lje gvceftev arte gftwrcrtetttmu 



[January 20, 1900 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F W. KELLEY, Peopbiktob. 

The Turf and Sporting Authority of too Pacific Coast. 



— OFFICE — 



22 1=2 GEARY STREET, San Francisco. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 

C. E. Goodrich, Special Representative, 31 Park Row, New York. 



Terms— One Year S3, Six Mouths St. 75, Three Months St. 
8TRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be Bent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. >V. Kelley. 21)4 Geary it, San F;ancisco, Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer s name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee of 
good faith. 

San Francisoo, Saturday, January 20, 1900. 
Dates Claimed. 



COLUSA July 23d to 28th. 

WILLOWS July SOtb to Aug. 4th. 

RED BLUFF Aug 6th to 11th. 

CHICO Aug 13lh to 18th. 

MARYSVILLE Aug 20th to 25tb. 

WOODLAND Aug. 27th to Sept. 1st. 

STATE FAIR, Sacramento Sept. 2d to Sept 15th. 

Stallions Advertised. 

TROTTERS AND PACERS. 

ALTAMON T 3600 J. M. Nelson, Alameda. Cal" 

ARTHUR W 2:11^ J. M. Nelson, Alameda, Cal. 

BAYSWA TER WILKES S. H. Hoy. Winters, Cal 

DIABLO 2:09V 4 Wra. Murray, Pleasanton, Cal. 

' DIRECT 2:05% Thomas B. Keating, Pleasanton, Cal. 

GAFF TOPSAIL 2:17 1 *j Edw. Kavanagh, Vallejo, Cel. 

HAMBLETONIAN WILKES 1679. ..R. L Moorhead. Santa Clara, Cal. 
McKINNEY 2:11M O. A. Durfee. Pleasan ton, Cal 

THE NORTHERN DISTRICT has sprung Phoenix 
like from the ashes of lethargy which covered it during 
the past few seasons, and is out with an announcement 
that the six agricul'ural associations of Colusa, Willows, 
Red Bluff, Chico, Marysville and Woodland have organ- 
ized a circuit and have claimed the six weeks beginning 
July 23d and closing September 1, 1900. The programs 
for all these meetings are to be the same, and each is 
to include four nomination purses for the harness horses 
of $1000 each. The northern circuit will open at 
Colusa and close at Woodland and the meetings will 
follow in the order given above. This is the very best 
piece of news the Breeder and Sportsman carries 
to its readers this week, and will be hailed with delight 
by the owners and trainers from Puget Sound to San 
Diego. That the Northern District will give a circuit of 
racing that will be first class we have no doubt. There 
are excellent mile tracks at each place and the counties 
wherein they are located are in one of the most pros- 
perous sections of the State. Stock, grain and fruit are 
the principal products, and some of California's greatest 
stock farms are located there. The enttrprising officers 
of these six districts have come to a realization of the 
fact that in union there is strength and the Breeder 
and Sportsman predicts that if the programs are 
arranged to catch the horses in training on this 
Coast, that the entry lists will be very large. Colusa 
has never before held anything but a local meeting, 
and this fact alone is sufficient evidence to convince 
those who have had experience in county fairs that it 
will probably have the largest attendance of any place 
on the circuit. A. district fair will be new to Colusa, 
but it is one of the best towns in Northern California 
and a prosperous one. The railroad hauls are all short 
on this circuit, which will be another attraction to horse 
owners; freight bills count very largely in campaigning 
expenses. Success to the Northern Circuit, and may the 
entries be numerous, the management good, the racing 
high class, the attendance large, and each and every dis- 
trict have a cash surplus left in its treasury. 



A STALLION by Red Wilkes out of a daughter of 
Nutwood ought to be valuable in the stud especially if 
he is a- good individual. One of that description is 
advertised for sale in this issue. 



"NO MAN should bide his light under a bushel." 
Every owner of a well bred stallion owes it as a duty to 
his horse to f/ive him all the publicity possible. Many 
a great horse has passed an inglorious career only be- 
cause his "penny wise and pound foolish" owner buried 
the merits of a good animal in obscurity. Other horses 
have become great sires simply because they were exten- 
sively advertised and through being talked about and 
their names becoming well known secured a better class 
of mares and thereby begot great sons and daughters. 
The stallion owner is generally a man who is not good 
at drumming up business. Many are rich men who 
don't realize that it is due the best interests of breeding 
and their farms that the merits of their horse be kept 
before the reading public, and others forget that every 
time the name of their stallion appears in print it adds 
to his value and to his chances of greatness. The cheap- 
est and best method and one that will accomplish far 
reaching results is to advertise in a reputable and well 
established turf journal. An advertisement in such a 
newspaper is a constant factor that is always adding to 
the value of the horse, being read by many people and 
kept on file for reference. Every close observer admits 
that the prospects are brighter this year than for many 
years past and that the market for high class horses is 
a rising one and that all horses of quality are now selling 
at remunerative prices. Now is the season for breeders 
to let the public know what they have and the sooner 
they do it the sooner they will fill their books. Stallions 
advertised in the Breeder and Sportsman will receive 
in the reading columns of the paper a description of the 
horse, together with a tabulated pedigree. The Breeder 
and Sportsman has every facility for furnishing stallion 
posters, tolders and single cards and tabulating pedi- 
grees and will do all work of that description at reason- 
able prices. 



A SENSATIONAL STALLION. 



A SALE OF ROADSTERS took place at Chase & 
Mendenhall's salesyard last Tuesday which was well at. 
tended and aroused quite lively bidding. Prices ranged 
from $ V> to $160, the majority bringing over $80. Mr. 
Albert Joseph, paid the highest price, $160, for a gray 
pacing mare of unknown breeding that had shown a 
mile in about 2:20. The majority of the horses sold 
were by Silver Bow, but had never been trained and 
were not sold as race horses. A number of draft horses 
brought from $(55 to $125. A pair of dapple grays sold 
for $250, a pair of blacks for the same price and a pair 
of grays that weighed 3500 sold for $400. 



WOODLAND IS IN LINE for 1900, and has already 
announced its date for a fair and race meeting. A letter 
from Secretary C. F. Thomas to the Breeder and 
Sportsman under date of Jan. 25th gays: "Kindly 
announce in your valuable journal that Woodland will 
give a fair and race meeting this year, and that it will 
be given on our old date, the week preceding the State 
Fair at Sacramento. Liberal purses will be given and 
all accorded fair treatment. We hope to see all our old 
friends, and to make many new ones." 



MR. NAGLEE BURR'S HORSES in training which 
are to be sold at the Oakland track, Thursday, January 
25th, ought to be eagerly snapped up by those who want 
ready made racing material. They can win without 
having a fortune spent on them and are ready for the 
word now. The sale will begin at 11:15 A m. next 
Thursday, and all will be sold without reserve. The 
blood lines of the youngsters run back through all the 
royal families. Wm. G. Layng is the auctioneer. 



Dan Li£»in«er has a string of six young trotters and 
pacers at the Fresno track, besides the stallion Prince 
Almont 2:13}, which will make a season there in the stud. 
Dan has four youngsters by Msjester a eon of Sterling that he 
savs are acting very much like future race winners A green 
pacei by this horse, out of a thoroughbred mare, he calls 
Bobby J., which has already shown him a quarter in 35 sec- 
onds. (George M. is the Dame of a green trotter by M' jester 
out of the dam of Neerout 2.12}, that is a good one and a two 
year old full brother is already showing speed at the trot. 
Mr. Lieginger says C. E. Clark has seven head, J. R Albert- 
son six and Chas. Owen five that they are gettiDg ready for 
the California circuit. There is some talk (f orgm zing a 
stock company acd purchasing the Fresno track which is the 
best appointed country track in the Slate. Messrs. Canfield 
and Chancellor, the well known oil men, may take a block of 
the stock. 



Pilot Pkince 2:22} by Dexter Prince, dam Emma Nut- 
wood bv Nutwood, is being driven in the park by his o*ner, 
Prof. E. P. Heald. He is a fine roadster, as he always has 
his speed with him and is ready for a brush at any time. 
Pilot Prince will make the season at Napa this year, where 
he is well known and his get very popular. He is the sire 
of Joe 2:16ij and Pilot McClellan 2:22}. We know of several 
of his produce that are likely to make low records this year, 
which will bring him prominently before the public as a sire. 
The breeders of Napa are to be congratulated on having the 
services of a horse of this high quality at their command. 



Diablo '2:09 1-4, Led All Pacific Ooaet Stallions 
Last Year. 



At the close of 1899, Diablo 2 09}, had six new representa- 
tives in the 2:30 list, which placed him in the lead of all 
Pacific Coast sires of that year, and among this half dozen 
was Clipper 2:09}, the fastest new performer of the season on 
the Coast, and N. L. B. 2:21$, the champion two year old 
pacer in the United States in 1899 The slowest of the six 
was Rey del Diablo, a two year old that took a record of 
2:23} and is confidently expected to put 2:10 opposite his 
name before the close of 1900. Dddaelion 2:11, was another 
of the green ones that took a low record and he was a winner 
in some of the hardest contests of the year, and won over 
$1600 on the small California circuit. To say much about 
the great merits of Diablo as a sire, to speak of the uniform 
good looka of his progeny and their uniform great speed 
seems a waste of time, as all horsemen know that any mare 
of the right sort bred to him will produce "something worth 
bothering with" something that will repay the small service 
fee and the care of feeding and raising it. Diablo is but ten 
years old, yet his list of performers contains the names of 
nine with records from 2:09} to 2:23}, five being 2:15 per. 
formers and the only ones slower than 2:17$, two year olds. 

Diablo was a sensation on the track. He started first as a 
three year old and beat some of the beBt aged horses out that 
year getting a record of 2:14} in a race against a big field 
which he won in straight heats. 

The next year be had to meet the crackerjack pacers on 
the Coast, but he defeated (hem in every race in which he 
started. His first race that year was at Napa, where he won 
in straight heats, with Loupe 2:09 and Molly Allen behind 
him. The next week at Petaluma W. Wood 2:07 and 
Plunkett 2:13} were his opponents. He again won in 
straight heats One week later Diablo met W. Wood 
Eclectic and Plunkett at Woodland. The first heat was a 
dead one between Diablo and Wood in 2:12}. The second 
heat Diablo won in £:09}, at that time the champion four 
year old record of the world. He won the next two heats 
and the race, the time of the third heat being 2:11$, which 
proved him to tie not only fast but dead game. At the 
State Fair Diablo was started in the free for all class, bis 
antagonists being W. Wood, Our Dick and Plunkett. W. 
Wood beat Diablo the first two heats in 2:08$ and 2:09$, but 
Diablo was at his throat latch each time and won the third 
heat in 2:14$, the fourth in 2:11$ and the fifth and last as 
he pleased in 2:17. This ended his racing that year and 
he was not raced in his five year old form. In 1895, when 
he was six years old, he started once, defeating W. Wood at 
the State Fair in the free for all in straight heats, the time 
beirg 2:10, 2:12} and 2:16. His racing career was now com- 
pleted aod it shows an unbroken line of victories. 

r Strathmore 
( Steinway i 

< Abbess by Albion 

Chas. Derby 2:20.. < 



I 

t. Katie G.. 



I Alcantara 



[ Barcena.. . 



Electioneer 
1 Fanny Malone by Niagara 

Geo. Wilkes 

Alma Mater by Mamb. Patchen 
< Bayard 



( Blandina by Mamb. Chief 11 

Let us now take a look at the pedigree of this sensational 
horfe. He is by Chas. Derby 2:20, the sire of Much Better 
2:07}, Derby Princess 2:08$, Diablo 2:09}, Owyhee 2:11, 
Cibolo 2:13$, Derby Lass 2:14, Flare Up 2:14 and five other 
2:30 performers. Chas. Derby's sire Steinway 2:25} is the 
sire of the champion three year old Klatawah 2:05$, nine 
2:15 performers and thirty-one 2:30 performers. His sire 
Strathmore is one of old HambletODian's greatest sons, being 
the sire of nine in the 2:15 list, eighty-three 2:30 performers 
and has thirty producing sons and sixty-five producing 
daughters. 

The dam of Chas. Derby, Katie G., has five in the list in- 
cluding the three year old world's champion. She is by the 
great Electioneer, the champion sire of 2:30 speed in the 
world, ha\ing 156 to his credit and the founder of one of the 
greatest trotting families. 

Bertha, the dam of Diablo, is the dam of four in the list, 
viz.: Diablo 2.09}, Elf 2:12$, Ed Lafferty 2:16$ and Jay Eff 
B., yearling record 2:26$. and two of her sons, Demonio and 
Don Derby, will take standard records this year. Bertha i 8 
by the great Alcantara, sire of 130 in 2:30 and still living' 
with 26 of them in the 2:15 list, and having for a sire the 
mighty Geo. Wilkes. Bertha's dam, Barcena, produced one 
with a record of 2:11}, and was by Bayard 53, son of Pilot 
Jr., and out of a daughter of Blacdina by Mambrino Chief 
11, that produced the sires Swigert, King Rene, Abdallah, 
Pilot and Solicitor. The whole pedigree of Diablo bristles 
with the sires and dams of great performers, and contains 
the nsmes of the greatest: Geo. Wilkes, Electioneer, Alcan- 
tara, Strathmore, Mambrino Chief, Mambrino Patcben, Pilot 
Jr., Steinway and Chas. Derby among the sires, acd Lady 
Watermere, Green Mountain Maid, Dolly Spanker, Abbess, 
Alma Mater, Blandina, Katie G , Barcena and Bertha 
among the great broodmares. All the blood in Diablo 
breeds on and he is certain to be one of the great producing 
sires of America if he lives. 



January 20, 1900 J 



rCk>ntinaed from First Page.] 

ing the track in perfect condition. That the horsemen ap- 
preciate what has been provided for them is shown by the 
fact that ten of California's leadin? harness horse trainers 
have already taken up their qcarters there, and Mr. C. B. 
Charlesworth, the popular young Secretary of the corporation, 
has received applications from as many more who want to 
occupy stalls by the first of February. Three celebrated 
stallions are already located there, Direct 2:05*, Diablo 2:09J 
and McKinneyl2:ll}, and in all probability there will be 
others. 

The trainers who are already on the ground with strings of 
horses are T. E. Keating, C. A. Durfee, Ed Lafferty, J. M. 
Alviso, Millard Sanders, Wm. Murray, H. C. Webster, J. 
Sutherland, James Thompson, Wm. Cecil, M. J. Turner and 
£. L. Breck, and we will btate right here in all seriousness, 
that the trotters and pacers now occupying stalls there are 
the best looking lot of young light harness horses ever seen 
on that historical track. Year after year there has been an 
improvement in the looks of the California bred trotters and 
pacers, and it is the universal expression of those who visit 
the breeding and training farms that Californians have of 
late years been wise enough to breed for sizs, style and looks 
as well as speed. 

T. E. Keating was absent in San Francisco on the day 
of our visit, but his efficient assistant John Blue was looking 
after the welfare of the members of the string. We saw him 
jogging Klatawah 2:05}, the champion three year old of the 
world. Kept out of training last year this grand looking 
horse looks to bs in perfect form now. He has received no 
fast work at all as yet. As he went by, Millard 8anders, than 
whom there are few better judges of a race horse, turne i to 
us and said : "Mark down what I tell you: That horse will 
beat every pacer in America this year." And as Blue 
Itopped to let us look him over he added, u Keatiog says he 
is certainly the best one he ever drove." Anaconda is look- 
ing big and 6trone, having recovered all the flesh he lest on 
his campaign last year and will be as good as he ever was 
and perhaps belter. One of the new additions to the string 
is the Humboldt county horse Eureka 2:15}, by Ira, who will 
be given a trial to see whether he is grai.d circuit material 
or not. He has not been tried yet but he has raced well in 
California, was a good two and three year old and comes 
highly recommended. Keating's new purchase D^n Derby, 
foil brother to Diablo 2:09}, was in his stall nursing a blister 
but looks like good g)ods. He is only a prospect as yet. A 
big bay three year old colt by Chas Derby, out of a Gen. 
Benton mare had ju?t arrived from Oakwood Park the day 
before and nothing is known of his abilities as yet, but he is 
one of the grandest lookers that ever wore a light harness. 
It is worth the trip to see that "little black rascal'' of the 
good old days, Direct 2:05}, taking his regular exercise on 
the track hitched to a bike cart. He certainly looks ready to 
race and feels like it too. He ought to and will do a heavy 
season to some of the best mares iu California this year. 

C. A. Doreee has j ist got comfortably located with big 
string, which consists of four old enough to race, and three 
youngsters. Clipper 2:09i, his fast son of Diablo that won 
his first race easily last year, paced the fastest mile of the 
year in California, excepting of course the Los Angeles 
meeting, and then had a streak of bad luck, accidents, etr., 
is at least a hundred pounds heavier than he was and can 
pace a quarter in 30 seconds right now. He will reduce bis 
record to the neighborhood of 2:05 sure this year, unless 
something happens to him. Mr. Durfee's mare Miss Jessie 
2:14 that he has been offering for sale at $1000 when nobody 
that had the money was near enough to hear him, is one of 
the grandest looking mares in America. She is by Gossiper 
ont of Leonor, the grandest young broodmare in California, 
she having produced Jennie Mac 2:09, Dr. Book 2:13|, Miss 
Jessie 2:14 and one other. Miss Jessie will be trotted this 
year and ought to win in her class. She has a seven month 8 
old colt by McKinney that ought to be a worthy successor to 
that great horse. One of the best set of legs and feet we 
ever saw under a three year old, held up the handsome body 
of a filly by McKinney out of Nona Y. 2:20 by Admiral. 
She will be seen in the Occident Stake this year in which 
eight others by McKinney are paid up on. When the groom 
led out a big three year old colt and Mr. Durfee said, "that's 
Ben Liebes by McKinney," our firjt expression was, "That 
fellow is a dead ringer for the pictures of the dude of all 
stallions, Mambrino King." He is a wonderfully tall, rangy, 
and at the same time handsome colt. His dam was by 
Robert McGregor. He has speed and will be raced this 
year. A good looking colt by McKinney out of an Alta- 
mont mare that looks as though be will be a fast one is called 
McSweeney, and in the stall with him was a filly by Mc- 
Kinney out of his own daughter. She is coming two years 
olds and is built, looks and acts like a trotter, and we will 
venture the prediction that this handsome black inbred Miss 
will place her name in his 2:15 list within two years. The 
champion sire of 2:15 performers of his age, McKinney 2:11}, 
with eleven in that select list at 12 years, had not arrived in 
Pleasanton at the time of our visit, but he will be taken up 
there in a few days. 

Ed Lafferty, who drove W. Wood to hie record of 
2:07 and has landed many of the fastest performers in Cali- 
fornia first at the wire, has a string of seven at Pleasanton, 
Addison, the iron gray or black gelding by James Madison 



whose record was reduced to 2:11} last year, is the only one 
among them that has a mark. He is looking particularly 
well and Ed thinks ought to cut a little off his record this 
year. A five yeai old pacer by (iuy Wilkes 2:15} out of 
Wanda 2:14 is getting his first lessons and seems to be quite 
an apt scholar. He ought to reach 2:15 on h s looks and 
go it five seconds belter on his breeding. A three year old 
colt by Bay Bird is another that Lafferty should win a race 
or two with. He is an extra good looker and fast for a 
green one. The others in the string are young, coming three 
year olds, but they are members of the royal families. They 
are the property of Mr. W. E Lester of this city and are all 
fillies. J One is by the great Kremlin 2:07:} and is a high 
class one, another is by Baronstein and the third by Allie 
Wilkes out of a full sister to Joe Patchen. They are just 
broken, but are all very promising. 

J. M. Alviso has all his time occupied with ten trotters 
and pacers, among which are some excellent prospects for 
1900. Rey del Diablo 2:233 as a two year old is now three 
and Al says is showing more speed than ever. He is a 
very handsome colt, looks and acts like a race horse and wil| 
pace in 2:10 this year or AI i6 going to eat him. Every 
horseman in Pleasanton says that if that iB Alviso's only 
chance to eat meat he might as well make up his mind to 
live on a vegetable diet hereafter. Alviso also has a four 
year old gelding by Diablo out of a mare by Don Marvin 
hat is a fast green trotter, a four year old filly by Direct 
out of Rosita A. 2:1 4 J that can pace a quarter in 34 6econds i 
a chestnut filly by Directum out of a mare by Piedmont and 
a full sister five years old that are all very promising. The 
two last named belong to the estateof Tbos. Green of Dublin. 
There are five others under Alviso's charge belonging to 
Mr. Juan Galleeos of Mission San Jose. A three year old 
gelding by Diablo out of a mare by Nutwood is one of the 
grf ndest looking ycurjg trot'ers we have seen in a year and 
he is good gaited and fast. A bay gelding also by Diablo, 
and the same age, out of a gracd daughter of A. W. Rich- 
mond, is also very handsome and also a trotter. A six year 
old gelding by Soudan, a mare ol the same age by Dalton 
Moultrie, both trotters, and a four year old pacer by Direct 
complete this string. 

Millard Sandeks. whose reputation as a speed maker is 
as wide as the continent, has a string of ten that carry as big 
an average of good looks and choice blood as any ten young- 
sters that can be collected from any one State in the Union. 
Eight are from the celebrated Oakwood Park Farm. There 
aie full sisters to Derby Princcs3 2:08}, Agitato 2:09, and 
Derby Lass 2:14, and a full brother to Klatawah 2:05} that 
is a high acting trotter and one that will get a low record at 
that gait. "This sister to Derby Price ass," said Mr. Sanders 
as he dismounted from the sulky after giving the filly her 
work, "needs company to bring out her speed. She acts and 
moves very much like her much traveled sister, and gives 
more promise than . he did al the same age. That sister to 
Agitato is a square trotter and has already shown me a quar- 
ter in 37 seconds. I like her won erfully well I'd like to 
name that brother to Klatawah. I'd call him Hyac Klata' 
wah which in the Chinook is superlative of Klatawah which 
means 'Get away fast.' He has already trotted me a quarter 
in 38 seconds with no work and without being urged in the 
least. That four year old MeKinney filly is trotting a 20 
gait already. She'll do to a certainty, and I believe this 
sister to Too Soon by Direct is a high class one. Of course 
I have not tried to get any speed out of these colts yet, as 
they have had no work and it is too early but I never had as 
promising a lot together and as you know I have trained 
some pretty fair strings in my time. I don't think there is 
one in the lot but could beat 40 seconds for a quarter if taken 
out the stall right now and asked to do it. And, by the way, 
I got a letter from Chas. Tanner at Cleveland the other day 
and be says the supply of matinee and race trotters is ex- 
hausted, but that pacers are in fair supply." Mr. Sanders 
certainly has a grand looking lot of youngsters, and we were 
pleased to see so many promising trotters among (hem. 

Fred Wfbster has the largest string at the (rack and Mr. 
Chas. Griffith, their owner, ought to be and doubtless is 
proud of their looks and condition and satisfied with their 
prospects. The handsome four year old by Direct out of 
Bon Bon by Simmons, that paced a workout mile in 2:13 and 
the last half in 1:02* last year in his three year old form 
with a dozen reliable men holding watches on him, is, of 
course, the star of the lot, and there is more than one of 
the horsemen at the track who think be is a two-m<nute 
pacer sure. He is a handsome black fellow, good size, with 
lots of quality and legs like a thoroughbred, clean, flat bone 
and wonderfully muscled. He will be raced this year. 
Many have asked the privilege of breeding to him, but al] 
were refused, aB Mr. Griffith desires to give the colt every 
chance for a low record before retiring him to the stud. He 
has not been moved any beyond a jog this year. Rect 2:10}, 
by Direct out of Lily Stanley 2:17}, is going to be tried 
again. That he is a wonderfully fast trotter there is no 
doubt, and if bis leg stands, hie record will certainly be re- 
duced. It was fired last year and the veterinary has pro- 
nounced it capable of standing race work. There are iLree 
two year olds by Rect in tke string, one out of Bon Bon, one 
out of a daughter of Gen. Benton and another out of a mare 
by Robert McGregor. After looking them over one cannot 
help thinking it a misfortune that Rect was gelded. He 



would have made a great stock horse, as he is a good looker 
himself and these colts all look like him. Thev are all 
pacers and worth working. Sharkey is the stable name given 
a four year old son of Direct and a mare by Nutwood that 
John Blue says is a pretty good ringer for Ed Geers' $10,000 
colt Hal Direct. He is a glutton for work and showed lots 
of speed last year. Mr. Webster has two Diablo ihree year 
olds— one out of a mare by William L., second dam by Rob- 
ert McGregor and third dam tie dam of Nancy Hanks, 
The other is out of a mare by Abdallal. Pilot. He is email 
for a Diablo, and though only hitched up a few times can 
run away on the equaresl trot one ever saw. Corona 2:27} 
by Direct is in perfect order to get a faster record this year, 
and if she is steady she is fast enough to go in 2:10. Mr 
Webster's string will be seen on the California circuit thi B 
year. 

William Murray led out bis great young stallion Diablo 
2:09}, and has him in good shape for the heavy season he is 
certain to do. "Bill" is one of the best men with a horse 
there is in the State. They all seem to know just what he 
wants ihem to do and try to do it. Diablo obeys him as well 
as a well trained dog does his masler. The reader will find 
an extended notice of Diablo on another page of this issue. 
Murray has a chestnut filly, tbree years old by him that 
has just been broke two months and pulled him in a cart a 
mile in 2:36 last week. She is a pacer. There is another in 
his string, a two year old colt out of a mare by Cropsy's 
Nutwood that is very promising for a youngster. He has 
been working a very handsome gelding by Diablo, out of a 
mustang mare that shows what good looking horses Diablo is 
siring. Murray will not have a large string as his time will 
be taken up with his stallion. 

William Cecil has ten from the Nutwood 8iock Farm' 
all t>y Martin Carter's great stallion Nutwood Wilkes 2:16}. 
There is not one in the BtriDg with a record, and the pacer 
irvington Boy is the only one that ever started in a race. 
He was out last year as a three year old and could pace inside 
of 2:20, but was unfortunate and did not win a heat, though 
he earned $655 as his share of the purses. He is going now 
without hopples and Cecil thinks he will go in 2:10 or better 
this year. Ceorgie B , a mare that trialed in 2:28 two years 
ago, is now five and 2:12 won't slop her. She is also a pacer- 
Cecil has two favorites, one he calls Bob Ingersoll is a four 
year old out of Lou G., dam of Who Is She 2:23 and Fred 
Wilkes 2:26} by Albert W. the other a two year old out of a 
mare by Director, next dam I ida W. 2:18} the d<-m of Nu'- 
wood Wilkes, ibus Lida W. is the colt's grandam on both 
sides. This fellow is entered in some of the big Eastern 
stakes for next year and Cecil tbinks he has a good claim on 
a big portion of the money already. A full sister to Central 
Girl 2:22} is another promising two year old, and several 
others that are good looking young horses and every one 
baB shown raciig spetd. This stricg was not selected for 
training, but comprises all that were in the pastures last 
year at Nutwood Farm and are old enough to work. It is 
astonishing bow tbey all show speed, but then the Nutwood 
Wilkes all do that. 

James Thompson, who first brought out Little Thorte 
2:09}, has this game little pacer at Pleasanton. He is in 
good flesb, looks strong and robust and will be a good money 
winner again this vear if he is campaigned. Mr. Thomp- 
son has the mare Monica by McKinney 2:11} and a five 
year old gelding by the same horse that are both excellent 
prospectB. Monica will be another 2:15 performei for Mc- 
Kinney sure, if she remains right. Mr. Thompson will 
have four or five new ones in his string in a few days and 
said: "Come up about the middle of February and I'll show 
you some speed," 

Jamfs Sutherland has made another ten strike. He 
sold his old farm come months ago for $22,000 and purchased 
60 acres for $9000 just enjoining Pleasanton track, whereon 
he immediately laid out and graded a perfect half mile track, 
built a neat dwelling, and the best arranged barn of box stalls 
we ever saw. He had about a dczen colts and aged horses in 
them and was getting ready to open his speed school in 
earnes', when along came a representative of the Spring 
Valley Water Company and told him the company wanted 
the land for its water privileges. Mr Sutherland said $25,- 
000 was the price, and it was paid to bim forthwith. He 
cays he has got enough now to keep him and the good wife 
the rest of their days and every person that knows Jim 
Sutherland is glad of bis good fortune. He will move the 
horses to the Pleasanton track and work them. He has 
Charley G , a trotter by Direct, a brown filly by Diablo out 
of a Delwin mare, a four year old full sister to Directly 
2:03}, a brown gelding by Falrose, a Ihree vear old filly by 
McKinney out of tne dam of Prince C , Solo 2:23 br Mc- 
Kinney, the stallion Ouard 2:22} by Guide, a four year old 
filly by Direct and Harry Hurst by Delwin. They are a 
very promising lot, all but Guard being intended for the 
races this year. 

E. L. Breck, of Bodie, has a colt by Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16}, out of a Naubue mare at the Pleasanton track that is 
a very handsome young horse and a good prospect for 1900. 
He has just begun on bim and likes him very much. 

M. J. Turner, one of the old guard, is working a bay 
gelding by a son of Nutwood that attracts the attention of 
everybody that visits the track. He has very high action, 
but has trotted, the track better than 2:30 and is as handsrme 
as a picture. If Turner had him in New York the dealers 
would be after him, and when they secured him would chop 
bis tail off and make a $2000 trotting bred hackney out of 
him in short order. Mr. Turner thinks the gelding will trot 
better than 2:20 this year. 

Thos. B. Murphy is not training any horses at the track, 
but he is there Saturdays and Sundays plating them so they 
can be trained Murpby is building up a big business at his 
new shop on Golden Gate avenue in this city and between it 
and his Pleasanton forge he is working aboul'eight days in 
the week. 



38 



<frjj* gve&fex am* gtp&vx*ntaru 



[January 20, 1900 



The Sulky. 



Several new stallion ads this week. 



Bates for pasturage have been materially reduced. 

Free Haney is training a half dozen horses at the Modesto 
track. 

Quarter Cousin holds the Russ ian trotting record o^ 
2:Ui. 

The spring meeting at Denver will take place June 16th 
to 20ih. 

There are already about seventy-five horses in training at 
Pleasanton. 

Azote 2:04} weighs 1280 pounds and never looked so well 
as this winter. 

Pancoast earned $21,500 in stallion fees while owned at 
Parkvillt. Farm. 



At the Lexington meeting in 1901 fuur races for three 
year olds will call for $31,000. 

Hoppled horses will probably be abolished from the New 
York speedway. 

Peter the Great 2:07} will be trained after June 1st. 
The chances are that Bingen 2:06} will not be seen in public 
this season. 



Woodland claims the week just preceding the State Fair 
for its meeting this year. A first class fair and race meeting 
will be held. 



f . E Keating and James Thompson were over at Oak- 
wood Stock Farm this week looking at the many good young 
horses there 



The Diablo colts and fillies at the Pleasanton track are a 
grand looking lot of youngsters. No stallion in California 
has sired more uniform good looks. 



When Splan bought Col. Kuser for 2:11} for Mrs. Mc- 
Phee he paid about $3l00 for the son of Stranger, and on the 
European turf this trotter has won $40,000. 



H. S. Hoooboom has a five year old Diablo that is said to 
be the fastest trotter on the Sacramento track. Mr. Hogo- 
boom will have him out in the green classes this year. 



Andy McDowell has twelve horses in training at Park- 
ville i'arm One of the colls which he will train for J. H. 
Shults is Oro Wood, a three year old by Oro Wilkes 2:11, 
out of the dam of Fred Kohl 2:07}. 



Columbia is the name claimed for a yearling filly by 
Clipper 2:09}, owned by Geo. C. Petermann of Mt Eden, 
California. Clipper is now a gelding, but was bred to several 
mares when a two and three year old. 



Nine trotters hold harness records better than 2:07, viz.: 
Aliz 2:03}, Nancy Hanks 2:04, Azote 2:04}, Directum 2:05}, 
Fantasy 2:06, Beuz tta 2:06} and Ralph Wilkes 2:0b}. 
Three of this number took their records as four year olds. 



The grandstand inside the Jewett covered track is enclosed 
with glass windows and heated by natuial gas. It is a great 
treat to sit there by the fire while the air is freezing cold out- 
side and watch the prospective campaigners taking their 
exercise. 



Geo. W. Ford writes us that Neeretta 2:11} will be raced 
in California if there are races enough for the 2:12 class. 
Otherwise she will be taken East, and go down tbe line of 
the Grand Circuit. She is in perfect health and as sound as 
a new dollar. 



Secretary C. M. Jewett, of the New England Trotting 
Horse Breeders' Association, says that for the Grand Circuit 
meeting this year bis association will likely increase the 
Massachusetts Stake to $20,000, and, of course, make it an 
early closing event. 



Barney Demabest has sold the bay gelding Iago 2:11 by 
Tempest, dam Eulogy by < ommodore Belmont, to F. W. 
Sawyer, of Derby, Ct., for $700. He will be used as a mati- 
nee horse. Iago was sold at Cleveland in May, 1898, /or 
$3000, but be is getting along in years. 



Ed GEEhs, who said Direct Hal for $10,000,^still owns his 
dam, Bessie Hal, and she is in foal again to Direct. She is 
also the dam of a filly by McEwen 2:18£, a filly by Brown 
Hal and a colt by Sky Pointer. Mr Geers says he will 
breed her next spring to Heir-at-Law 2:05}. 



Knap McCarthv who recently looked Searchlight care- 
fully over says he never saw tbe horse looking better or go 
ing better. He is jogged every day by Ed Mills, of Boston, 
who bought him fjr Mr. Brooson, and is moving as smooth 
and 'easy as he ever did. Knap thinks he will be able to 
beat two minutes next season, sure. 



Supebintendent F. W. Covey says there wiil probably 
be a change in tbe order of business at Palo Alto next year, 
and that there will be but one annual eastern sale, this to 
consist of four or five carloads. In Mav about fifty head 
will be placed in training for the sale of 1901. so that nearly 
a year will be given to developing them. 



The get of McKinney 2:11}, seem to have a mortgage on 
the Stanford and Occident Stakes to he trolled this year at 
the California State Fair. In the former seven out of the 
fourteen entries upon which third payment t>as been made 
are by McKinney, while in the Occident Stake eight of the 
twenty-two colts or fillies still eligible were sired by that 
horse. 



Our Jack 2:13£ by 8teinway has been sold by W. J. 
Irvine of Sacramento to W. C. Christie of Kansas City. 
Richard Bejson, tbe well known trainer, who is acting for 
Mr. Christie, 'ays that he will probably have Our Jack 
docked and sell him for a park horse. He is a very high 
actor and has lots of style and good looks. He was bred at 
the Oakwood Park Stock Farm. 



It is said by a writer of Bpeedway gossip for a New York 
daily that when Robert J. and Jobn R. Gentry met recently 
on Riverside Drive it was at once apparent to close observers 
that the old friends and stable mates, who traveled thousands 
of miles togelherin 1897, recognized each other immediately. 
The intelligence of the high bred horse is often more acute 
than even his admirers accredit. 



The beginning of 1900 finds two trotters in /he 2:04 list — 
Alix 2:03}, and Nancy Hanks 2:04— while an even dozen 
pacers bave marks against (heir names as follows: Star 
Pointer 1:59}. John R Gentry 2:00i, Joe Patchen 2:01}, 
Robert J 2:01 J, Anaconda 2:03}, Bumps (wagon) 2:03}, 
Directly 2:03}, Searchlight 2:03}, Frank Agin 2:03}, Flying 
Jib 2:04 Mascot 2:04 and Online 2:04. 



A distinguished feature of the pedigree of Bayswater 
Wilkes, sise of Kelly Briggs 2:101. is that bis first and second 
dams are not only producers of standaid trotters but are 
strictly thoroughbred mares, registered in the American 
Stud Book. Fanny Bayswater his first dam, produced 
Senator L 2:23}, four mile record 10:12, and Bessie Sedg- 
wick, his second dam produced Bessie Tborne 2:22}. 



A fair and race meeting will be held in Tulare this fall. 
The Board of Directors of the Twenty-Fourth Agricultural 
District held a meeting in that city last Tuesday and so de- 
cided. Mr. E A. Miot was elected Secretary for the coming 
year, and committees were appointed to begin work imme- 
diately and push the milter to a successful conclusion. The 
district is composed of tbe counties of Kings and Tulare. 



John Wells, a stockman of Oregon, went to Los Angeles 
four weeks ago with a carload of fine Oregon mules of his 
raising. He sold the mules to Mr. Shearer of Los Angeles, 
and delivered them at Elwood, 150 miles north of the orange 
city. Mr. Wells then returned to Lob Angeles to dispose of 
a carload of horses recently shipped there by Spratt Wells, 
his son. For his carload of mules Mr. Wells received $60 
per bead. 

For the Occident 8take of 1902. Ranch? del Paso has 
made the largest number of entries of any one farm, 11 colts 
and fillies being named Santa Rosa Stock Farm is ;next 
with sis , Oakwood Park Stock Farm has five, Palo Alto 
Stock Farm, the late D. E Knight of Marysville, Alex. 
Brown of Walnut Grove, H. W. Meek of Haywards and 
Aptos Stock Farm each made, four entries. The 94 entries 
represent 51 owners. 

"Dick" Benson, will probably take Waldo J . 2:08, to 
Kansas City with him when he leaves for home next week. 
Mr. Benson looked bim over tbe other day, liked him. and 
the price was satisfactory. If the gray ghost of 8anta Paula 
meets with no accidents he will show the way around tbe 
track to some of the very fast ones this year. Budd Doble 
says Waldo J will be in good hands, as there are no better 
trainers than Mr. Benson. 



Mr. W. J. Harris, the wealthy mine owner of Spokane, 
Washington, greatly regrets losing the colt by McKinney 
2:11} out ot tbe dam of Klamath, but is consoled somewhat 
by the fact that the old mare is heavy with foul to the same 
horse and he has already booked her to bim for the season 
of 1900. The colt that met an accidental death was as near 
a perfect individual as any colt of tbe same age that was ever 
foaled, is the verdict of all who saw him. 



Five thousand citizens of Philadelphia, prominent in 
every walk of life, among them A. J. Cassett, Colonel A. 
Louden Snowden, ex-minister to Greece, George A.Singerly, 
J. Fred Betz, Colonel William A. Bunn and Frank Bower, 
have signed a petition asking the city officials to build a 
speedway in Fairmount Park. Tbe city authorities favor 
tLe project, but a State law which limits the speed of horses 
within tbe city limits to seven miles an hour stands in the 
way. The incoming Legislature will be asked by 20 000 
horsemen to repeal that law so far as speedways are concerned, 
and there is little doubt of tbe result. 



There are a good many trainers of tbe present day who 
practice the Geers' method of workouts, four to six slow 
heats and a "blow out" mile in slow time later. This is 
probably a necessity to get the horses in first class condition 
for racing on the big tracks. It is likely not a necessity with 
all horses, and in fact, any arbitrary rule of training is a 
dangerous one to follow, since no two horses are exactly 
alike in disposition, in stamina, in quality, and it is an open 
question if the methods which lead to a survival of the 
fittest are invariably the best or most profitable. No trainer 
who is alert and up to dale works his horses in the early 
morning hours, by this I mean their fast work. If the race 
comes off on a hot, sultry day horses worked in such a man- 
ner will most likely "wilt down" at the critical point of the 
race. 



The first of the progeny of the great voung stallion 
Searchlight 2:03}, arrived at C. L. Crellin's Ruby Hill 
Farm near Pleasanton, on January 3, 1900. It is a colt, is 
the same color and bears nearly the identical markings of 
his illustrious sire. Mr. Crellin could not remember the 
breeding of tbe dam when he gave the news to the Breeder 
and Sportsman's representative, but says she has a three 
year old by Diablo 2:09} that shows lots of speed, though 
she has not been thoroughly broken yet. The little son of 
Searchlight was a pacer as soon as he could stand up and has 
never struck any other gait since. Mr. Crellin says bis 
name is Search Warrant and he has the light thereby to go 
anywhere and be expects he will march inside the two- 
minute mark when he gets old enough and ready. Here's to 
Search Warrant, and his owner. May their shadows never 
grow less, but may the colt be fast enough to get away from 
bit. 



The good stallion Expedition 2:15}, by Electioneer,|dam 
Lady Russell, is still owned at Woodburn Farm, says tbe 
American Stock Farm. He was sold at the Woodard & 
Shanklin sale to Mr. J. H. Thayer, but as that gentleman 
wanted to train bim and he bad developed a slight lameness, 
he declined to take him and Expedition was returned to 
Woodburn. Whether he will be in tbe stud the coming 
season or not is not known, but if he does he will make the 
seventeenth of tbe sons and grandsons of the Hero of Palo 
Alto (hat will do stud duty in that State. It looks as if Ken- 
tucky will in the near future have plenty of the Wilkes and 
Electioneer blood with which to supply their friends, as 
there are about fifty of the male descendants of George 
Wilkes scattered throughout the Blue Grass. 



In some respects Lucille 2:09} is one of the most remark- 
able trotters ever seen. She was bred by a farmer and was 
broken as a three year old, but not being of great promise 
was put to breeding and kept at that for three seasons, pro- 
ducing her last foal in 1898 Last spring Amos Rain bun, 
of Glens Kails, took her to race on shares. The mare was 
used to do the work of spring planting and was not delivered 
a'. Glens Falls until June 10, 1868, and ber career as a 
trotter began the following day, when she was hooked to a 
cart and jogged. A bout the middle of August she showed a 
mile in 2:18 It was not, however, until tbe mare reached 
Louisville and Lexington that ber full worth became known 
to the public. She won two races at Louisville and one at 
Lexington, in which she went three faster consecutive beats 
than any green trotter has ever gone. The time was 2:10}, 
2:09}, 2:10}. Later, after she was sold to C. G. K. Billings 
of Chicago, she beat every trotter she met on tbe New York 
speedway and all were out but Cobwebs. Lucille is a dark 
bay, standing 15 bands J inch high. She is a line trotter and 
an exceedingly long strider, but trappy gaited. Lucille is by 
Brummel, a eon of Epaulet, and out of Fanny K. 2:21} by 
Major Benton. 



Dr. E. J. Wfldon, of Sacramento, who owns and drove 
the brown filly Elevator in the Stanford Stake at the State 
Fair last year, finishing third in the summary, will make an- 
other appeal to the Board of Review, and has engaged Mr. 
C. A. Willis, now of Sacramento, but formerly of New York, 
as his counsel. Tbe case is an interesting one. It will be 
remembered that Direct Heir finished second in the race, and 
was protested by Dr. Weldon as not eligible, having once 
been declared out and payments stopped on him by his 
owner, Mrs. Severance, of Los Angeles. Dr. Weldon's pro 
test was sustained by the Board of Review which placed his 
filly second in tbe summary and supposedly entitled to second 
money. Here arose another complication, however. Dr. 
Frasse's Sister, tbe winner of each beat, was also a protested 
horse, and the rules say that in any beat which a protested 
horse shall win, distance shall be waived. It is held by the 
association that the distance flag was used, however, and the 
distance horses noted on tbe book that they might be declared 
so if the protest against Dr. Frasse failed. This protest did 
fail and the association claims that the waiving of distance 
did not apply and the horses must stand as shown on the 
Judge's book. Dr. I Weldon insists that Elevator was not 
outside the flag in any heat, and the decision of tbe question 
will hinge upon the fact whether or not Elevator was de- 
clared distanced. 



The track of the Chicago Driving club, which was built 
last season, is one of the finest in or about Chicago. It was 
completed last summer, but inclement weather prevented its 
opening before October, when more exciting races were 
offered to the public than were ever seen in the city pre- 
viously. Expert judges of matters of this bind admit lhat it 
is the finest half-mile speedway in tbe country, and probably 
in the world. It was planned by Seth Griffiith, who has a 
great reputation as a track builder, and tbe turns are as fast 
as tbe stretches. Already about $15,000 has been expended 
on the track, stables, judges' stand, sulky room, etc. A 
modern grand stand is to be erected and latter a fine club 
bouse will be built. An artesian well furnishes a copious 
supi ly of sulphur water in front of each stall. They now 
have room for 100 horses and stalls are being engaged daily 
by some of our best owners and trainers. Willard Cave, 
Dick McMabon, who gave Jersey Mac bis record last year, 
Sam Halls, and George Castle will undoubtedly train there 
the coming season. It is also highly probable that Mr. 
Marks, the owner of Joe Patchen, Mr. Streeter, Mr. Newgass 
and others will have horses at the new track. It is located 
wilbin easy visiting distance of the down town-districts of 
the city, being at Central avenue and Twelfth street; no 
tiouble need be experienced in reaching it. The Twelfth 
street cars run to the main entrance, and the Metropolitan 
elevated will, during the coming season, run direct to the 
grounds. 

" Iconoclast " in a recent article says: "It had been 
discovered years ago that the pacer bad the speed to go in 
two minutes, as Westmont had done with a running mate. 
But whether he could carry such a clip for a mile drawing a 
sulky and driver was the question. This is happily settled 
and the next problem is to find others that ean do the same 
thing besides Star Pointer. I feel very confident that it 
will be done, and it would not at all surprise me if it should 
be done next year." It seems that experts fail to agree on 
this point, as on many another. "Trotwood"of the Horse 
Review, writing on the same subject says: "There will be 
more or less talk of this bind indulged in for years to come, 
but the fact will be lhat Pointer's record will stand for many 
years. Only one bind of a horse is ever going to break it. 
First, be must be a big horse. It takes a certain extent of 
stride to pace in two minutes, everything else being equal. 
There are many little horses that can pace faster than big 
horses. There is a limit to the number of strides any horse 
can take in a second. Therefore, if tbe number of strides 
be equal, tbe time of delivery the same, and horses are of 
equal gameness, the larger horse with the longer stride will 
pace the fag'er. Tbe only horse that ever was a serious 
rival to Star Pointer 1:59} was Joe Patchen, a horse of the 
same mould physically. Gentry and Robert J. both paced 
beyond the limit of little horses, and Gentry's 2:00} was as 
great a heat for him as 1:59} would be for a larger horse." 
However this may apply to pacers, it does not hold good 
with trotters, for both Alix 2:03}, the holder of the world's 
record, and Nancy Hanks, the ex-queen of the trotting turf, 
and whose record is 2:04, are what may be called small 
horses, as is Directum 2:05}, the stallion king, and with all 
the large horses on the trotting turf their supremacy has 
never been seriously threatened. 



January 20, 1900] 



39 




Ttjbsday was a bad day for the "dopere," no less than 
thirteen new starters, on which they had no line, making 
their first appearance. 



The late Duke of Westminster donated $50,000 to the 
Alexandra Hospital at Rhyl, which was the amount won by 
his horse Flying Fox in the Eclipse Stakes. 



President Aui/l of the St. Louis Fair Association has 
announced that the racing at the Fair Grounds will begin on 
May 2d and continue ninety days, as last season. 



There are too many five furlong rsces on the program at 
present, so many races at the shorter distaLces {do not speak 
very favorably for the class of horses running at present on 
the local tracks. 



The hurdle race over a mile of ground on Wednesday was 
a most farcical affair, three of the starters finishing while the 
other five contestants met with varied mishaps in their 
journey round the ring. 

The two year old division is furnishing the most exciting 
contests of the present racing season; in most of the events 
for two year olds the youngsters finish in a bunch, heads and 
noses separating the first three or four. 



P. J. Dwyer has decided to discontinue keeping up a 
racing stable, and in the spring will sell the majority of 
his horses, reserving only a few which he will put in the 
hands of a public trainer. 



The Fretter on Tuesday set a new mark for Tanforan 
Park running the mile in 1:39} with ninety-five pounds in 
the saddle He went a long mile too, finishing well out in 
the center of the track after being forced to go around his 
field. 



Installator made his first start in a long time and was 
made favorite in the five furlong dash for non winners in 
1899 and 1900. The old horse certainly outclassed his field 
but was so big and gross that he could hardly get out of his 
own way. 

Geyser and Bendoran met at weight for age in the seven 
furlong Jash on Wednesday and Geyser demonstrated him- 
self to be ut questionably the best horse in training in Cali- 
fornia at present winning with ridiculous ease in the fast 
time of 1:26 flit. 



Jockey Jenkins on Monday accomplished the feat of 
riding five winners and was beaten but a bead in his sixth 
mount. This record was equaled by Eddie Jones on one oc- 
casion at the Oakland track at its first opening and Tod 
Sloan had the same experience in England the first year he 
rode there. 



Ailenna was claimed by Tony Tuberville on the occasion 
of her last start, he paying $625 for the filly. Mr. Carruth- 
ers, one of her former owners, expressed no regret at losing 
her as she has been a most uncertain racing proposition, his 
total winnings from all her starts being represented by the 
insignificant sum of eighty dollars. 



Large purchases of cavalry horses are still being made 
throughout California and Oregon by agents of the English 
government. K. O. Goustad, a buyer, last week purchased 
from F. M. Green six head for cavalry purposes. Among 
this number was a beautiful little grav pacer kept by Mr. 
Green as a private saddle horse When asked the price for 
this animal Green placed the figure so high that he thought 
the buyer would laugh at it, but instead, be snapped it up 
and closed the trade so quickly that it almost took the seller's 
breath awav. The handsome little animal was purchased 
for an English captain in the Transvaal war. — Lake Co. 
(Or.) Examiner. 

The most undesirable feature of the racing at present is 
the exhibition of hurdle jumpers every few days at Tanforan 
Park. It is hard to conceive why these events are continued 
on the program; the? certainly do not tend to raise the 
standard of racing, as the class of horses competing is of 
the lowest. As a betting proposition nobody wants them, 
the bookmakers being very charvot handling money and the 
heavier bettors passing them by without speculating. The 
element of danger Brieing from incompetency of both horses 
and jockeys participating is another bad feature and the 
sooner these events are eliminated from the card the more 
satisfactoiy it will be for the patrons of racing. 



The great increase in the number of horses that will race 
in the metropolitan circuit next season is forcibly illustrated 
by the following table, which gives the total entries received 
this year to the Brooklyn Jockey Club Stakes, as compared 



with those received in 1899: 

1900 1889 

Brooklyn Handicap. 67 66 

Parkway Handicap 54 45 

Broukdale Han leap 64 45 

Myrtle Stakes 61 48 

Patchogue stakeB 58 41 

Broadway Stakes 66 67 

Preakness -takes 65 56 

Fa en stake* 64 89 

May itakes 63 48 

Clover Sfakes 76 70 

M»iiba»»et K'4 75 

Han ver »6 76 

Bedford 99 68 

Urand National steeplechase 178 — 

Greater New York Steeplechase 70 87 

Kensington Hurdle Handicap 51 26 



Harry Thoburn made his first appearance this season at 
Tanforan Park and nearly succeeded in making a runaway 
race from such good ones as St. Casimir, Ben Ledi, Mocorito 
and High Ho. Theory, however, got up in the last stride 
and gained the verdict from the old horse by a bead in the 
fast time of 1:13 for the six furlongs. 



The probable starters in the Turf Congress Stakes at Tan- 
foran to-day are Bendoran 124, Bannock hum 124, Geyser 
121, Zoroaster 119, Advance Guard 104, Yellow Tail 104, 
Flower of Gold 9s* and Sardine 99. The horses meet at 
weight for age and the racejwill enable the public to form an 
opinion as to the respective merits of the best horses now 
racing in California. 

Jfan de Rhszke, the famous opera siDger, is the leading 
turfman and sportsman in Russian Poland. Horses bred or 
owned by him have won the principal stakes in Hungary, 
Austria and Russia He is a student of pedigrees and horses 
mated according to bis views have been eminently successful. 
On his last visit to America he bought twelve mires for $30,- 
000 at the Rancocas Farm. 



The American Sporting Manual of 1900 contains all 
racing records at large, revised and complete up to the end of 
1899; four handicapping systems with directions (or their 
practical application, a table showing how to compute book- 
making percentages, track records of all the recognizd 
tracks of the country, the Western and Eistern scales of 
weights, tables showing the comparative speed of tracks, a 
complete list of pugilistic contests of 1899 of any r. ns - 
quence, trotting and pacing records at all distances and a list 
of the new 2:15 trotters of 1899 Also a complete recrrd of 
performances at all styles of billiards, together with scores 
of all the important matches and tournaments of 1899. 



In the Baden Stakes for three year olds, which was run off 
last week, sixteen contestants faced the starter. First honors 
were gained by Louir Ezill's filly The Lndy, with Advance 
Guard second and F. W. Brode third. Arjiu, which waB 
probably the best colt in the race, was made loo much use of 
by her rider the first part of it and finished outside the 
money. Oa Monday last a sort of consolation free handicap 
was arrarged for tbe unplaced horses which started in the 
previous Baden Stake at the same distance and at the same 
weights, in which Anjou demonstrated that he wss pounds 
the best of the field to which he was opposed. Spencer rid- 
ing at top weight, made the running for the first quarter and 
then allowed to pacemakers to pass him. At the half for 
some unknown reason he took his mount back to last posi- 
tion and was finally obliged to pull out and go round bis 
field; making bis run in the stretch Adiou closed very strong 
and won by a head from Erwin with Tar Hill a distant third. 
With a well judged ride Arjsu should have won as he 
pleased. 

The following weights have been announced for the Fol- 
lansbee Handicap at seven furlongs to he run at Oakland on 
Monday: Bendoran 148, Timemaker 136, Rosormonde 131, 
Arbaces 130. Fly by Night 130, Duke of Middleburg 130, 
Ventnro 128, Dr. Sbeppard 125, Montgomery 125, Meddler 
125, Yellow Tail 123, Eddie Jones 123, Olinthus 123, For- 
mero 123. King's Carnival 123, Imperious 122, San Mateo 
122, Napunax 121, Advance Guard 121, David Tenny 120 
81y 120, Pat Morrissey 120, Judge Wardell 120, Sam Mc- 
Keever 120, First Tenor 120, Obsidian 118, St. Cuthbert 118, 
Senator Bland 118, Sea Lion 118, Jerry Hunt 118, Storm 
Kirg 118, Recreation 117, Tom Cromwell 117, FHwerof 
Gold 116, Asian 116 Racivan 116 Gsuntlet 116, 8trongoli 
116 Tar Hill 114, Herculean 114, Alleviate 114 Klamora 
113, Yaruba 113, Faversbam 113, Rio Chico 113, F. W. 
Brode 112, St. Magdalen 112, El'a Bolord 110, Bathos 110, 
Boundlee 110, Bamboulia 108, Burdock 108, Diomed 107, 
Constellator 107, Synia 105. Florabird 103 Nilver Fizz 103, 
Mortgage 103, Red Maid 101, Antonietta 101, The Echo 100. 



Secretary Rdssworm expects fo arrange for a splendid 
spring meeting at Cumberland without the usual stake 
features, and a schedule has been decided upon. The plan, 
while unusual and unique, can hardly fail to prove popu'ar 
with both horse owners and the public. It embraces the idea 
of c tiering a program made up of purses and handicaps, with 
values ranging from $300 to $1000. The smaller events will 
be given away absolutely by the association, but for each 
horse that enters for a purse larger than $300 a charge of 
from $5 to $10 will be made, according to the siza ef the 
purse. To eBch of the three or four handicaps to be in- 
cluded in the program the association will add $500, but the 
entrance fee will not be increased beyond $10. It is thought, 
and witb good reason, that this plan will insure good fields 
of the best horses in each event, while horeos of leBS class 
will be satisfied to run for $300 purses, to which entrance 
will be free The events to which entrance will be charged 
will invariably be closed the night before the day set for the 
race. The $1000 received from the Turf Congress will be 
divided, and $500 added to each of the two handicaps, thus 
increasing the value of the events to $1000 as the association 
will add $500 to each event. The schedule will be fashioned 
after the Ontario Jockey Club. 



A nent the proposed bill to be introduced in the New York 
Legislature oompelling racing associations to offer no purses 
of less than $1001', the Turf, Field and Farm makes these 
sensible remarks: "Report comes from Albany that some new 
bills in regard to racing will be introduced in the present 
Legislature with a view to fixing tbe amount of purseB to be 
given. Ever- body who bas the good of racing at heart will 
deplore any more racing legislation in this State, for, when- 
ever the question is discussed in the Legislature the interests 
of the turf are brought into jeopardy. The powers of the 
Racing Commission in conjunction with the Jockey Club are 
sufficient o handle tbe problem and the experience and im- 
provement of the sport and its allied interests under their 
management is sufficient proof that no further legislation is 
at present needed, and it is to be hoped that it will be 
allowed to rest as things are now. Racing is i dangerous 
subject for legislators to handle, for any discussion of it in- 
variably stirs up a hornet's nest among the fanatics and 
the moralists (?) which results in serious trouble for the sport 
at il all interests dependent on it. Let well enough alone, ia 
a safe policy which should be followed in all things. Where 
a new agilation would tend or what might be its results can- 
not be anticipated. Too much legislation is often as harmful 
as none at all, and the happv medium which now governs 
racing should be left undisturbed. 



Tanforan Park Summaries. 



I WESTERN TURF ASSOCIATION. 1 
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11. 

Five and a half furlongs Selling. Maidens. Three vears old 
and upward. Purse I4f0— Uppercrmt 31 (Buchanan) 20 to 1 won. 
First shot 101 second, naming Event !>1 third. Jazabel. Qoldflnder, 
Redwald, Mi kb Reed. Beautiful Bill, Uterp, Cymona, Morella, Sem- 
Iramide. Time 1:08V 

One mile. Selling. Four years old and upward. Punte 8100— 
Oreyhurst 111 (Bullman) 11 to 1 won. Tom Cromwell 114 second. 
Tom Calvert 111 third. Ladaea, Indra, Collins. Time 1:12% 

One mile and a quarter. PellinR. Three years old and upward. 
Purse 8100— Meadowihorpe 109 (lenkins) 12 to 1 won. Chimura 102 
second, Dr. BernayB 109 third. Forte, Dr. Marks. Tlma 2:10J^. 

One mile. San Bruno Stake. Th'ee years old. Value 11200— The 
Lad" 109 (N. Hill) IS to 1 won. Advance Guard 117 second, F. W. 
Brode 108 third. Erwin. Anion. Tar Hill. "Bevus Bill. Bathos, 
Mortgage, 'urn Dannenbanm. Wallenstein, Hindoo Princes9' 8unello, 
Nance O'Nell, Bee Bee. Time 1:41. 

One mile. Three vears old and upward. Purse S400— Bannock- 
bum 101 (Bullman) 11 to 20 won. Malay 106 second, imp. Mistral II., 
109 third. Rosormonde. Time 1:40V 

Six f lrlones. Selling. Three years old and upward Purse 8100 
—Ben L"dl 102 (E Ross) 3 lo 1 won. Mocorito 113 second, Ilngle 
Jingle 104 third. Whitcomb, Kitty Kelly, Orion, 8torm King, Miss 
Marion. Time 1:14%. 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12. 

Three furlongs. Two vear old colts and geldings. Purse 8100 — 
Rathgar 108 («pencer) 7 to 5 won. Dunfree 110 second. Sig Lew 111 
third Carlonlan Oaylon Brown, And'attus, Wardman, Briton, 
Woeful. Time 0:36%. 

Six furlonvs. Three years old. Purse ?400-St. Casimir 109 (8pencer) 
2 to 9 won, Mountebank 109 second, Diomed 109 third. St. Anthony. 
Time 1:14. 

One mile and one-eighth Selling. Three years old and upward. 
Purse $=O0— Opponent 91 (Phelan) 3 to 1 won, Topmast 95 second, 
Bcotch Plaid 103 third. Eins ein, Casdale. Time 1:53%. 

Five furlongs. Selling. Four yea" old and upward. Purse 8400 — 
Sngden 118 (VittUoe) 12 to 1 won. Espirandn 117 second, Ann Page 
111 third Momentum. Modwena, Nora Ives, Croker, Mainstay, 
Tourist II., Jennie Nevine, Hunch, Ach. Time 1:01V 

One mile. Selling. Four years old and upward. Purse 8400 — 
Duke of York II. Ill (Thorpei 3 to 1 won, r-harles le Bel 111 second, 
Credo 111 third. Colonel Root, Hohenlohe, Pongo, The Wooer, 
Loconomo. Time 1:42V 

One mile and one-eighth. Selling Handicap. Four years old and 
upward Purse 8400— Sardonic 1T9 (9nencer) 4 to 5 won. D-. Marks 

111 second, Facade 100 third. Tom Calvert, Midian, Gold Baron. 
Time 1:55%. 

SATURDAY. JANUARY 13. 

Three furlongs. Two vear old fillies. Purse tinO— Sofala 108 (Bull- 
man) 9 to 10 won, LiW Diggs 108 second, Laura Marie 108 third. Opal 
Stone, Moonbright, Kingstelle, Ullagon, Lilly Simpson, Core. Time 
0:58%. 

One mile and an eighth. Selling. Four year olds and npwerd. 
Purse 8400— Stuttgart 104 (Bullman) 9 to 10 won. Del Paso 122 second, 
Whaleback 111 third. Tirade, Faversham, Inverary II. Time 1:56%. 

Five furlongs Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse S400— 
Monda 113 (Jenkins) 8 to 2 won, Romany 113 second. Wild Het 115 
third. A Baldwin Sr., Autioch, C. H. Harrison Jr., Lona Marie, The 
Last. Time 1:01%. 

One mile. Three year olds. Purse S600— Anjiu 115 (Spencer) 4 to 1 
won. Erwin 110 second. Tar Hill 109 third. Bogu« Bill, Bathos, Sam 
Dannenbaum, Hindoo Princess, Sunello. Time 1:42. 

Six furlongs. Three year olds and upward Purse 8400— Time- 
maker 115 (Jenkins) 16 to 5 won Flower of Gold 92 second, Sardine 92 
third. Olinthus, Gusto. Time 1:13. 

One mile and sn eighth. Hurdle handicap. Fonr year olds and 
upward Purse $IOO-Lomo 130 (D. Henry) 3 to 1 won, Rallsta 130 
second, Meddler 135 third. University, J. O C„ Una Colorado, Sar- 
donic. Time 2:05 

MONDAY, JANUARY 15. 

Five furlongs. Selling. Three year olds. Purse 8400— Alary's 
Garter 107 (Jenkins) 9 to 2 won. Beautiful Bill 112 second. First Shot 

112 third Summer, Ant'er. St. Anthony, Favorlto, Gusto, Coming 
Event, Tomale. Time 1:01%. 

One mile. Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse 1400— 
Lady Meriisome. 106 (Jenkins) 3 to 1 won, Tom Cromwell H6second, 
Storm King 116 third. Credo, Owyhee, Croker, Milt Young. 
Time 1:43%. 

Three furlongs. Two year olds. Pnrse 8400— Pofala 115 (Bullman; 
9 to 10 won, Slg Levy 113 second. M. F Tarpey 115 third. Gaylon 
Brown. Ro lick. Wardman. Time 0:3f%. 

One mile. Selling. Three year olds. Purse 8400— Mont Eagle 103 
(lenkins) 11 to 10 won, Antionetta 101 second. Aileena 103 third. 
Choteau. Rachel C, Ziska, Fille d'Or, Reginald Hughes. Time 1:43%. 

One and one-sixteenth miles. Handicap. Four year olds and up- 
ward. Purse 1500— Daisy F 103 (Jenkins) 9 to 5 won. Zoroaster 114 
second. Ventorn 110 third. Red Pirate, Einstein, Los Medanos, Grey- 
hurst Time 1:47V 

six furlongs. Selling. Three year olds and upward . Purse 8400— 
Theory 104 (Jenkins) 3 to 1 won, H Thoburv 97 second, Mocorito 109 
third. High Hoe, St. Casimir, Ben Ledi. Time 1:12. 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 16. 

Five furlongs. Three year olds and upward. Purse 8400— Head- 
water 113 (Spencer) 7 to 10 won, Mountebank mi second, Ella Roland 
99 third. Claraudo, Shellac, Ann Page, Melvln Burnham. Time 1:01% 

Three furlongs. Two year olds. Pnrse J<00— Andrattus 98 (T. 
Walsh) 20 to 1 won, Rathgar 110 second, Kingstelle 101 third. Laura 
Marie, Dunfree. Lily D ggs, Moonbrignt, St. Rica, Bride Ale, Ullagon, 
Woeful. Opal Stone. Time 0:86. 

Six fnrlnnes. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse $400— 
Ben Ledi 110 (E. Ross) 4 to 1 won. Good Hope 104 second, Racivan 104 
third. Socialist. Monda, Faversham, May Gertrude, Revanna, Kitty 
Kelly. Time 1:13%. 

One mile. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse J500— The 
Fretter 9"> (I. Martin) 25 to 1 won. Potentc 95 Bccond, The Lady 79 
thl'd. Catastrophe, F. W. Brode, White Fern, Bishop Reed, Billy 
McCloskey. Time 1:39%. 

"Five and a half f.irlongs. Selling. Three year olds. Purse 8400— 
Joe Mc'ice 104 (lenliins) even won Free Pass 104 (econd, Antler 109 
third. Miss Vera, Gusto. Time 1:08V 

Five furlongs. Four year olds and upward. Purse $500— Momen' 
turn 120 (Plegof) 4 to 1 won. Vlorls 101 second. A fghan 110 third- 
Jael Installa'or. Nora Ives. Tom Smith, Oahu, Helen G.. Delecta, 
Los Prietos, Hunch, Naples, Spry Lark. Time 1:01%. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17. 

Six furlongs. Selling. Maidens. Three vear olds. Purse 8400 — 
First Shot 106 (Bullman) 9 to 5 won. Coming Event 105 second. March 
Seven 97 third. Tom Sharkey, Fille d'Or, Tomale, Caesar Young, 
Tckla, Eila du Poy. Time 1:14. 

One mile. Four hurdles. Maidens. Four year olds and upward!. 
Purse 8400— Credo 13S (McKenna) 15 to 1 won. Una Colorado 139 »ec- 
ond, -Motor s. 130 third. Gilt Edge, Sokombeo, Meddler, Oralhee, 
Balista Time 1:54V 

One mile. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse 8100— 
Toriblo 121 (lenkins) )0 to 1 won, Del Paso 124 second, Sliver Tall 
101 third Time 1:41^- 

Seven furlongt. Three year oldi and upward. Purse 8600— Geyser 
109 (Spencer) 10 to 11 won. Advance Guard 94 second, Bendoran 1)2 
third. T«r Hill. Time 1:26 

Seven furlongs. Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse 8400 
- Chaa Le Bel 110 (Thorpe) 14 to 5 won. Owyhee 107 second, Pongo 
112 third. Tom Smi'h, Master I ee Col Root. St. Augustine. Loco- 
nomo, The Offering. U'erp, Delecta, Collins, Croker. lime 1:28. 

Three fnrlongB. Two year olds Purse 8400— M. F. Tarpey 111 
(Spencer) 1 to 2 won, Ullagon 110 second, Briton 110 third, Qaylon 
Brown, Looatlon, Time 0:87. 



40 



<Ri)e Qvttbsv onto *frp0vt*maxu 



IJanuart 20, 1900 



A PLEA FOR PROGRESS. 

The California Trotting Olroult of 1900 and Its 
Prospects. 

Wince the cloee of (he harness racing season of 1899 the 
question has been repeatedly asked what are the prospects 
for 1900? If the signs of the times are any indication in 
this particular, harness racing in California will reach a 
merited and much neeeed "boom " Not in many years has 
there been such a feeling cf enthusiasm.. 

With the beginning of the twentieth century we may sag* 
gest to the owners and trainers of horses and colts about to 
be worked, either for racing purposes or for the market, that 
not in years has there been such a bright prospect in either 
field. For good and promising well bred colts, either trotters 
or pacers, the owner can find a ready market at prices above 
the average, and it is to be feared the supply is not equal to 
the demand. The prospective racing season in California 
has not been so bright for years as it is this present year. 
This may be attributed to the fact that many of the district 
associations of the State gave no fair or race meetings for 
several years in consequence of not receiving State appropri- 
ations, but this having been granted the number of fairs 
will be greatly augmented this year. The midland counties 
of the State, containing the richest and most fertile land, 
and the farming, mining and fruit growing industries of 
these prolific districts will materially add to the present 
prospect of a successful season for the light harness brigade. 

California, great already in its production of speed, should 
be one of the first States in the Union to foster and protect 
this great industry. Here in this land o' born champions, 
both trotters and pacers, the sport should dominate in the 
minds of those whose love for the equine celebrity excels 
and to these we look for the perpetuation and protection of 
the breedicg ot the trotting horse. 

We are on the dawn of a prosperous era; the dull times 
that blighted the past, that dark cloud that hung over the 
horizon, is fast fading from our view, and instead we find the 
mercantile, commercial, as well as the farming and other in- 
terests of equal importance, assuming a healthy and pros- 
perous condition. 

The farmers, ill at ease through a succession of bad years, 
is now beginning to realize a new lease of life in his chosen 
industry. The opening of an auspicious season dawns be- 
fore him and he realizes that the day of prosperity is at 
hand and he feels with that depression which he had to con- 
tend with for years consigned to the past he can now engage 
in any pursuit commensurate with his taste. 

With this we may suggest that the breeding of the trotting 
horse, which was at one time of vital importance, may again 
be brought into action and the prices realized mike the same 
a profitable investment. 

Prices for horses of good breeding and quality were never 
higher than at the present time, and it is remarkable that 
the supply is not equal to the demand. 

We fine at the present time a woeful scarcity of the very 
useful breed, the carriage horse. This has led to the belief 
that in this line no more profitable industry could be com- 
menced than the bleeding, raising and developing of this 
kind of stock. 

Digressing a little from the subject under consideration 
I simply allude to the above to show that the great demand 
for each horses would in itself be an incentive to the breeder 
to try and produce this valuable kind, for if not developing 
sufficient speed for racing purposes they certainly will be 
valuable in the class we have just described. 

We find from a cursory examination of the prospects for 
1900 in California and Oregm, or in other words the 
Pacific States, that the outlook for good and meritorious rac- 
ing has not been so good for years. 

The districts that like Rip Van Winkle have been asleep 
for years are now awake and acting in unison with the never 
faltering ones, and with the opening of spring and the ad- 
vent of summer we may expect to see a season ot harness 
events never eclipsed in the annals of the trotting turf on the 
Pacific Coast. 

And why should it not be so? Here we raise and produce 
the best and it is only due to the lethargy of those in whose 
power it was to prevent it that the choicest and best of our 
native product should be taken to other states there to estab- 
lish their prowess for the edification of other people and the 
pecuniary gain of their owners. 

Let the public spirited lovers of California bred trotters 
awake and make our State the great center of attraction and 
with our local pride establish the fact that we can ap- 
preciate our native product by inducements of ^pleasure and 
profit as well. 

To accomplish this end we must begin by restoring im- 
plicit confidence. Changes of a radical nature must be in- 
augurated and with the opening of the present season new 
ideas nust be advanced, and the old and fossilized ones con- 
signed to oblivion. 

The various districts having in contemplation the giving 
of fairs and meetings should first confer and calmly deliber- 
ate as to the best means to advance tbe best results and to 
this end let the presidents and secretaries of tbe various dis- 
trict organizations call a convention in the very near future, 
Bay the first week in February, in some central location, say 
in Sao Francisco, appoint the proper committees, formulate 



a district or districts of racing circuits without conflicting the 
one with the other. Reorganize the whole system of con- 
ducting these fairs and race meetings, being careful at the 
same time to place the management in capable and progres- 
sive hands. While having all respect imaginable for the 
"honorable old gentleman" who have heretofore officiated in 
the various capacities of judge and starter let us in the name 
of all that is good thank bim for all that he has done in the 
past and assign him to the more peaceful position of inter- 
ested and honorable spectator. 

Young and progressive ideas must prevail if we expect to 
insure success. Our State has long suffered from tbe ills to 
which I have referred and the sooner these arj remedied the 
better for all concerned. The barriers to success must be 
removed and in their stead we must erect a system that will 
give strength to and confidence in all our enterprises, and 
thereby fortify every undertaking with all the surrounding 
elements of business sagacity. The banker, the merchant, 
tbe man of business affairs in the world will have none but 
competent men at tae head of their particular affairs, 
consequently their business is successful. When these 
men are not competent we note a signal failure; so it i s 
in tbe management of district fairs and race meetings. 
When competent men are in charge success is assured, bu t 
when incompetent we find their undertaking a dismal failure. 

I reiterate tbe necessity of practical men at the helm of all 
associations if tbe best results are to be obtained. This can 
only be accomplished by the employment of skilled men of 
practical experience to the position of starter and presiding 
eudge of undoubted character and ability in which the 
public will have confidence, whose standing is above re- 
proach and whose decisions in all instances appertaining to 
the rules will give general satisfaction. It is for this reason 
alone I advocate the services of such men; it is for this rea- 
son and none other that we seek to combine all elements to 
tbe end that such a one be employed throughout the Eastern 
circuit. Competent men can be bad for comparatively small 
fee and when the announcement is made that Mr. Sj-and-So 
is employed as judge and starter a new and enthusiastic feel- 
ing will permeate the entire commnnity, confidence receive a 
fresh impetus and California once more may enjoy its former 
prestige amongst the greatest harness racing centers of the 
American Continent. 

I give these matters for the careful consideration of tbe 
sport loving community in which your valuable journal is read 
having been a painful witness to some of the abuses to which 
I have referred it is my honest and disinterested ambition at 
the commencement of this auspicious season to have them 
corrected and I am confident that all fair minded men will 
agree with me in the suggestions I have offered. 

With a competent stranger as a starter and presiding 
judge confidence will again be restored and tbe public be 
more anxious to patronize the meeting. They expect prompt 
and excellent work in the judges stand, no bungling annoy- 
ances allowed but every effort made to please and satisfy the 
general public. 

California can give at least sixteen weeks of good harness 
racing within its midland circuit, traveling expenses can be 
minimized by active co-operation, and railways will not be 
indifferent to the legitimate requirements of its patrons in 
this particular. 

Let u<* realize the achievement of the above suggestions 
and there remains but one other matter to make harness rac- 
ing on this Coast all that we desire, and that is the system of 
betting allowed. There is one that is universally con- 
demned, and tha is bookmaking. Without an insurmount- 
able barrier being placed against this system all our ener- 
gies in favor of clean racing will come to naught. There 
should be no place on the trotting track for bookmaking and 
all true lovers of harness racing should see to it that no such 
system contaminates its grounds. 

While there are many men of "Home Manufacture" so to 
apeak, who may be capable of discharging the duties of 
judge and starter it must be admitted that in every district 
there is found to be some favoritism shown from time to 
time, and this in itself goes to show the absoulte necessity of 
the paid judge. 

Here in California we produce the greatest of race horsei; 
wby should we not then have great racing? Our climate is 
the best in the world for developing early speed ; horses can 
be trained at all seasons of the year, then why not develop 
the best here and make California the best market in the 
world for the trotting horse. 

California horses have a destiny before tbem. We produce 
the greatest, but there is an old adage, "The prophet is never 
honored in his own land." Let us, as Californians, take a just 
pride in our product; let us make a united effort to retain 
within our own domain that which we produce by giving to 
owner and trainer adequate inducements to stay with us. 
Let us give good purses with meetings ably and judiciously 
managed, and above all without any corrupting influences or 
entangling alliances. Let the competent judge and starter be 
employed and California will again enjoy the long-wished-for- 
millenium — honest racing conducted by competent and 
honorable men. 

The number of horses in training at present in California 
is unprecedentally large, never in its history could harness 
racing be given such an impetus. Let us not disappoint these 
prospective participants in this our natural pleasure. Let 
us infuse a new and lively character to our programs and 



when the sun sets on the last meeting of 1900 let it be said that 
California had the best and most successful meetings in the 
history of the State. This can only be accomplished by the 
concerted action of all. Let us work together for the com. 
mon good of all, and make the racing season of the current 
year enjoyable as well as profitable to all or almost all of 
those who contributed to its success T. J. C. 



Agreement. 

Whereas, The National Trotting Association and The 
American Trotting Association believing it to be to the best 
interest of the breeding and trotting interest of the entire 
country that the two Associations act in harmony in the 
government of races, and all contingent matters pertaining 
thereto, it is therefore, 

Resolved, That all fines or other penalties imposed by either 
parent association shall be recognized and enforced by tbe 
other parent association through its members and otherwise, 
the same as though imposed by itself. 

That the membership of 1899 is hereby recognized as a 
permanent membership of each parent association, and that 
neither parent association will receive in membership mem- 
bers of the other associations unless it continue its membership 
in said other parent association. 

We will endeavor as rapidly as possible to make and 
maintain a uniformity of rules, and will aid each other in 
all matters calculated to promote the trotting interest. 

This agreement shall remain in force from this dale until 
changed by mutual agreement. 

Members of Joint Committee — P. P. Johnson, President 
National Trotting Association; W. H. Gocher, Secretary 
National Trotting Association; W. P. Ijams, President Amer- 
ican Trotting Association; J. H. Steiner, Secretary American 
Trotting Association; David Bonner, George W. Archer, 
Wm. Russell Allen, Edward C. Lewis. 

Dated New York, Jan. 11, 1»00. 



The well known trotter Ante Dawn 2:19}, owned by 
Walter Kilpatrick, died recently of fistula. The horse had 
been suffering for nearly a year, and all efforts to cure tbe 
ailment were una vailicg. Ante Dawn was a bav gelding by 
Guy Wilkes 2:16} out of Auntie by Dawn 2:18}, the son of 
Nutwood 2:18}. He was foaled in 1893 at William Corbitt's 
San Mateo Farm, Burlingame, Cal., and was brought out as 
a three year old by Cupe Stinson, who drove him to a record 
of 2:19} at Boston. Mr. Kilpatrick has bought of Dr. Gill 
tbe bay gelding Royal Rene 2:20 by Roy Wilkes 2:06} out of 
Gladys B. by King Rene. Royal Rene gained his record at 
Davenport, la., in 1898. 



Mr. H. K Dkvereux, of Cleveland, Ohio, has exchanged 
the chestnut mare lams 2:38}, by Allerton 2:09}, with Vance 
Nuckols for Peko 2:11 }, by Electioneer. As she has every* 
thing a model broodmare should possess he bought her 
mainly to breed to John A. McEerron 2:12}, but after being 
bred she will be used in tbe matinees this ceason. She is by 
Electioneer, and her third dam Is the great broodmare that 
is the third dam of the champion three year old of the 
running turf, Jean Beraud. She has proven herself a pro- 
ducer in a filly by Dexter Prince which beat 2:20, and trotted 
a quarter in 30} seconds for the Maplewood Farm last season- 



Mr. Juan Galleoos, of Mission San Jose, is an enthus- 
iastic breeder of tbe light harness horse and has some very 
choice stock on his farm. He was a purchaser at the closing 
out sale of the Corbitt farm in 1898, and secured a number of 
good young fillies as well as the old mare Sable dam of Sable 
Wilkes. He has a colt from her by Nutwood Wilkes that is 
a very handsome and promising weanling. Mr. Gallegos has 
booked three mare; to McKinney this year. 



Dione 2:09} is tbe queen of the San Francisco speedway 
this winter. She is driven over that track nearly every day 
by Geo. Berry, Superintendent of A. B. Spreckels' private 
stable on Fell street, and there is nothing that can show her 
the way to the end of tbe road. 



To the Deaf— A rich lady, cured of her Deafness and 
Noises in the Head by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drum, 
gave $10,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people unable to 
procure the Ear Drums may have them free. Address No. 
680 C, The Nicholson Institute, 780 Eighth Avenue, New 
York. * 

The new rule of the Turf Congress not allowing ruled off 
persons on any tracks under its jurisdiction was enforced at 
New Orleans, January 5, against H. D. Brown, ruled off at 
Newport, and T. M. Berry, ruled off at St. Louis last season. 
They were on the track and were escorted beyond the limits 
of the grounds. 



D Dfl 111 IT O Bronchi; 
D If U If II O Troches 

the popular cure for 

IRRITATED THROATS. 

Fac-Simile 4 f / / on ever 

Signature of jRCJ /Z*m.4f><, 



January 20, 1900] 



4:1 



ROD. 



Russian river is now in prime condition for the angler. A 
number of nice fish, some ten-pounders among them, have 
been caught. The fishing being particularly good at the 
mouth of Austin creek. The water is in pretty good con- 
dition for bait fishing, a little milky however for spooning. 
There is an excellent place and plenty of room to move 
around in at the mouth of Austin, there it is as clear as 
glass. Many oig fish have been seen rolling, a large number 
were reported in the "big pool." Roe and shrimp are the 
killing baits at present. 



Point Reyes anglers are not catching many steelhead. It 
is more than likely that the fish have already gone up stream 
to spawn as there has been plenty of water in the Paper 
Mill for some time past, but generally too murky to observe 
the movements of the trout. 



An effort will be made to stock Lake Merced with a lot of 
small sized striped bass. Tbis move is being carried out in 
tho hope that the bass will clean out the carp in the lake. 
A number of large mouth black bass were placed in the lake 
last year. 

Col. Keliehor and Manuel Cross have been at Duncans for 
a week past. John Butler and John Lemmer started for the 
stream this week, the reports being so favorable that Lem- 
mer was prompted to make his first trip up there in seven 
years. 




CARTRIDGE AND SHELL. 



The Board of Governors of the California Inanimate Tar- 
get Association will meet at the rooms of the Olympic Gun 
Club on Saturday evening, January 27th, at eight o'clock. 
Preliminary arrangements will be made for the Eighth State 
Tournament at Fresno, on April 29th and 30th. 



The 8age Brush Gun Club of Elko, Nev., has been organ- 
ized, and the following officerb have been chosen for the 
coming Tear: John Henderson, President; A. W. Hesson, 
Vice President; W. H. Wallace, Secretary; E. Reinhart, 
Treasurer; C. E. Wilson, Captain; Joe Carroll, Property 
Man. 



E. P. Peterson, Otto Heins, Peter McRae, Dick Itgen, Joe 
Bickerstaff, Jim and Mike Macdonald made up a shooting 
party at Mt. Eden last Sunday. The hunters all made good 
bags. Pet McRae found upon going to his blind that some 
vandal had taken everything away including a lot of new 
decoys. 



The San Francisco Gun Club held an important meeting 
on the evening of the 12th inst. Arrangements were made 
for the coming trap shooting season. The officers elected for 
the ensuing year are: President, J. J. Sweeney; Vice- 
President, F. W. Kirjg; Secretary and Treasurer, W. E Mur- 
dock; Captain, Ed Schuliz; Directors— E. Klevesahl, A. 
Palmer, C. H. Shaw, C. A. Haight and Otto Feudner. 



The Christmas number of our English contemporary, the 
Shooting Times and British Sportsman, is an issue that will 
be appreciated by every sportsman who has the good fortune 
to peruse a copy of it. The articles on the various branches 
of sport are from the pens of experienced sportsmen and 
well known writers on sporting subjects, whilst the illustra- 
tions are the work of artists who wield not only the brush, 
but the gun, rod or rifle. 

We had occasion some time ago to mention in no very 
flattering terms an alleged slaughter of ducks on the Olay 
dam reservoir near San Diego. It turns out in the light of 
recent information that the slaughter of several thousand 
birds actually took place, but the birds were mud-hens and 
not ducks. The mud-bens were on the reservoir in thousands 
and bad become a nuisance and pest. The property is a 
shooting preserve and affords very good duck shooting at 
times. The mud-hens cleaned out the bait about fast as 
it was put in, hence the raid on the poor creature". 



Black brant shooting on Tomales bay is still good, a party 
composed of Henry E. 8kinner, Al Wilson, Orrin Peck and 
Fred 8. Sanborn have been enjoying the shooting there this 
week. These dainty birds are also found at the mouth of 
Eel river, the lower part of San Diego bay and at the Laguna 
Guadalasca seven miles below Hueneme. The hunters who 
shoot at this bay locate in boats across the mouth of a 
bight in this bay about the first of the ebb tide, after the 
brant by thousands have drifted in with the flood tide, when 
the tide commences to ebb the birds float along back with 
the tide to sea again. Upon approaching the vicinity of the 
boats they take wing, many of them flying entirely out of 
gunshot range. The hunters usually let a few flocks go by 
without molesting them, those coming after, each succeed- 
ing flock, observing that their predecessors have not been 
shot at, flying lower and lower, rarely however less than 
seventy or eighty yards, when the shooters fire, leading them 
well as they have a very rapid flight. A ten bore gun and a 
heavy load with No. 3 shot is required to bring them down. 
One boat is generally used to pick up the birds, the others 
being anchored. Some excellent bags of these sea brant 
have been made on Tomales bay. Black or sea brant shoot- 
ing down in Ventura county is described by a well known 
sportsman of Hueneme, Capt. Thos. H. Merry, as being ex- 
cellent at the present time. ' These fine birds," he says, 
"feed on a sea grass growing in the Laguna Gualasca, this 
grass is very sweet hence it is called by the native Califor- 
nians 'dulce.' The birds are now frequenting the lagoon 



mentioned in large numbers but are very, very wild. My 
method of hunting them, is first, to discover their line of 
flight from the ocean to the inside lagoon across the sand 
dunes. I then dig a hole behind a sand dune and fix a good 
blind. The brant only come in when the tide is half ebbed 
and as they fly overhead we shoot them. I use a 10 guage 
Colt's gun, 5 drams of powder and 1} oz. of No. 3 shot. 
The best bag I ever killed in one day, counted up eighteen 
brant." 

Live Bird Shooting Not Illegal. The Oases 
Against the Los Angeles Trap 
Shooters Dismissed. 

As was predicted in the columns of this journal anent the 
final outcome in the disposition of the charges brought 
against several gentlemen sportsmen in Los Angeles who 
were arrested at the instance of the Hnmane Society malcon- 
tents for alleged cruelty to animals, the society has not made 
a winning in the fight against the trap shooters. Last Mon- 
day Justice James handed down a decision in the test case of 
the People vs. A. W. Bruner, wherein the demurrer, in which 
it was contended that the acts coj plained of did not con- 
stitute a public offense, was sustained. 

Bruner was charged with cruelty to animals in that "he 
did torture, torment, mutilate and cruelly kill a certain ani- 
mal, to wit, a bird, commonly known as a pigeon." If that 
charge had been found to have any foundation in law then 
trap shooting would have had a set back as a sport. Counsel 
for the society insisted at the argument that when the killing 
of an animal is not done with a view of using the dead body 
for some useful purpose, or where its death alone is not de- 
sired for some urgent reason of necessity, that the act of kill" 
ing, whether it brings death instantaneously or slowly, must 
result in making the person who so kills an offender within 
the meaning ot the act. 

This view carries the effect of the law to an extremity 
which Justice James says he has not heretofore been led to 
consider and suggests a conclusion which he is not now pre- 
pared to adopt. 

"In my opinion," said the court, "the Legislature had two 
purposes in mind when they passed the act: First, to pre- 
vent the infliction upon animals of cruelty, torture or linger- 
ing suffering. Second, to prevent the growth of brutal and 
demoralizing tastes and practices. The first purpose in my 
opinion must be the controlling consideration by which a 
correct interpretation of the law is reached. The second 
alone does not furnish sufficient reason for the existence of 
the act in its present form. It is directed at and intended to 
8uppress8 all acts by which unnecessary suffering or torture 
is caused to animals; it is not devised for the purpose of 
correcting the moral conduct of people with respect to their 
pastimes and pleasures. If the latter had been the principal 
purpose the law would have been differently entitled and of 
another substance. I do believe, however, that where it 
appears that a cruel death has been inflicted upon an ani- 
mal, that it is very proper in looking for justification for the 
act if any is claimed, to consider the purpose for which it 
was done, the end to be accomplished and other appropriate 
surrounding circumstances " 

Justice James held that a person has an undoubted right 
to permit any animal which he owns and controls to live, or 
to cause its death; with this limitation, that while it lives he 
must properly care for and humanely treat it, and if he de- 
sires its death he must adopt a means least calculated to pro- 
duce suffering or torture. If the pigeon, in the case at bar, 
was released from the trap, and shot (and killed) instantly or 
practically so, then Justice James says he would hold that 
no provision of the act had been violated. And in such case 
the purpose of the shooting, the object to be attained, or the 
effect moraily or otherwise would be wholly immaterial. It 
might be, argues the court, that the pigeon was not brought 
to immediate death but was wounded and caused to suffer tor- 
ture and torment and would so bring the pigeon shouting 
within the meaning of the act. According to this construc- 
tion it will be seen that each case must depend upon its own 
individual evidence. 

The opinion of the learned Justice is one that is more than 
acceptable to not only sportsmen, but to all people who are 
endowed with an ordinary amount of common sense and who 
believe in the potency of the eleventh commandment — ' Mind 
your own business I" The intimation conveyed in the de- 
cision of Justice James that each case must depend upon its 
individual evidence leaves, unfortunately, the opportunity 
open for another attempt at pettifogging interference ; n the 
case of a trap shooter who instead of killing his bird only 
wounds it. It does not follow, however, that a prosecution 
under this reasoning would be any more successful than it 
was in the cases now dismissed. 



Netting Ducks. 

A market hunter (?) near Newman has arranged a large 
circular net trap and is industriously engaged in the con 
temptible practice of netting ducks. Over 2000 birds were 
shipped from that point one day last week. 

The bay fishermen, a picturesque and exceedingly un- 
scrupulous lot of rascallions, have ceased for the time being 
their uninterrupted daily violations of the law protecting 
striped bass and are now, many of them, devoting their time 
and attention to the netting of ducks. An immense pile of 
drowned ducks were seen in the Merchant street tish market 
last week, there must have been a thousand or more ducks of 
all kinds, wet and soggy, in the pile. These drowned and 
utterly unfit ducks for food are hawked about our streets by 
Italians, large and small. The peculiar reddish yellow flesh 
color of the birds shows that they met death by submersion 
and not by being shot. 

These nefarious methods have prevailed in many places in 
this State for several years past. It is about time that a halt 
was called. When the next Legislature is convened the 
game laws should be sc amended or changed as to prohibit 
netting and also the vending of netted ducks for food. 



The Wilson's Snipe* 



[By George Bird Grlnnell, Ph. D.] 
Although almost the smallest of our game birds the snipe 
is one ol the most highly prized. It is also, on account of 
its very wide distribution, perhaps better known to sports- 
men than any other bird which they pursue. Breeding as 
it does on the very borders of ths Arctic circle, and extend- 
ing its flights during the southern migration to the northern 
countries of South America, it occurs at one time or an- 
other of the year throughout the length and breadth of our 
land. The time was when good snipe shootine, some time 
during the spring or fall, could be had wherever favorable 
feeding grounds existed, but as this bird has been almost 
wholly overlooked by the game laws, and is shot at alt 
times and seasons wherever found, the snipe to-day— except 
in certain favored localities — is becoming one of the rarest 
of our birds. 

Notwithstanding its wide distribution and the fact that it 
is known to almost all sportsmen, the snipe has few loca) 
names. From its resemblance to the European species, with 
which, up to the time of Wilso n, it was regarded as iden- 
tical, it is almost universally known as English or jack snipe. 
Gordon Trumbull, in his most excellent and interesting 
work, entitled, Names and Portraits of Birds which Interest 
Gunners, tells ua that at different points in New Jersey and 
Maryland it is called bog snipe, and marsh snipe, obviously 
to distinguish it from the shore inhabiting beach birds, 
which are also commonly called snipe. In an article con. 
tributed to the Century Magazine, in 1883, I wrote: ' Few 
of our birds are so poor in local names as this one, for it i 9 
almost everywhere known either as the English or jack snipe. 
Along the New England coast, however, it has an appella- 
tion which is rather curious. As the bird arrives about the 
same time as the shad, and is found on the meadows along 
the rivers where the nets are hauled, the fishermen, when 
drawicg their seines at night, often start it from its mois 1 
resting place and hear its sharp cry as it flies away through 
the darkness. They do not know the cause of the sound and 
from the association they have dubbed its author the shad 
spirit." Mr. Trumbull calls attention to Nuttall's statement 
that in Massachusetts it is known as the "ale wife bird, from 
its arrival with the shoals of that fish;" and that in like 
manner, and for the same cause, on the Delaware it is called 
shad bird, while in the southeastern parts of Illinois, accord- 
ing to Mr. Ridgway, the common term for it is gutter snipe. 

The English snipe makes its appearance in New York 
about the middle of April, seldom much earlier, and often a 
little later, if the weather is cold and the season backward. 
The first warm rain which tempts the earth worms out of 
the ground is pretty sure to bring with It a flight of snipe. 
And if the gunner knows any good ground where a few 
birds still stop on their migration, he will be likely to visit it 
after such a rain. Yet at this time the birds are usually in 
poor condition from their long flight from the south, and 
as they are preparing to breed they should not be shot. If 
tbis shooting in the spring were absolutely abolished, many 
more snipe would breed in New York and the Middle Stale a 
than do so at present, and when the shooting season opens 
in the fall these local and home bred birds would by just 
bo much increase the opportunities of the local gunner. 
In other words, where, by his spring shooting, he has an 
opportunity to kill two birds, if he would wait until the 
autumn he would have a chance to kill six. 

The snipe has been found breeding as far south as Mary- 
land, and there are quite a number of records of nests that 
have been found in Pennsylvania, New York and New Eng. 
land. But owing to the persistent manner in which they 
are shot in the spring, most of the snipe pass beyond the 
United States to breed, and lay their eggs in the lonely 
marshes of Canada. 

It is this season of the year, when the days grow warm at 
midday, and the hylas in the swamp are still noisy in (he 
evening, when violets are in bloom and the bloodroot blos- 
soms snow white on the borders of the wet meadows, that the 
drumming of the snipe may be heard. This is a part of 
his love-making, which is quite similar in method to that 
of the woodcock. In the early morning, or at evening, or 
when the weather is dull and cloudy, at any time cf the day, 
the snipe may be seen to rise in wide spirals high above 
the earth, often almost disappearing from sight, and then to 
dart down. from on high with stiffened wings, uttering a 
twittering humming call, which has been said to be caused 
in part by the stiff wing feathers against the air in th 
rapid descent, but is no doubt vocal. When he has almost 
reached the earth he checks his fall and then drops into the 
grass, or perhaps he may alight on a fence, a tree twig, or 
an old stump, where he stands for a moment as if to be ad- 
mired, and then drops into the grass. There his mate is 
awaiting him, and about her he struts with head thrown 
back, trailing wings and expanded tail, eager to win her 
admiration. 

This performance of the snipe, though less familiar to us 
than any forms of love-making by the birds, is of course 
analogous to the drumming of the ruffed grouse, and the 
dancing of the prairie chicken, and is still more similar to 
the love songs of certain small birds found on the prairie, 
skylarks, and finches which, as they have no lofty perches 

• From the Third Annual Report of the Commissioners oi Fisheries, 
Otme, and Forest of the Btate ot New York. 



42 



January 20, 1900 



rom which they can sing, fly high in the air, and, descending Yet there are times when the snipe are lat and lszy and lie 

slowly on balanced wings, utter their song until they rea 3 h well, when a dog is yery much needed. Then they will le t 

the ground. The rapid fall of the snipe somewhat resemble,, you pass within a few feet of them without rising, and it is 
the downward dart of the night hawk. 



The nest is a primitive affair; just a little hollow in the 
ground, lined with a few blades of grass, in which the four 
eggs lie with their points all together. They are of a dull 
clay color, dotted and splashed with large and small spots of 
a blackish brown. The young leave the nest as Boon as tbey 
are hatched, and run about after the mother, as do young 



impossible to see them unless thry move. The subject of 
protective coloring is familiar to a sportsman, for we all 
know how hard it is to see a quail or a grouse crouched in 
grass or weeds before the dog's nose, a night hawk sitting 
on the rock, or a deer in the wocds or lyiDg on a bare rockt 
hillside, unless it moves. Few birds cfier better examples 
of protective coloring than the snipe; its blacks, browns i 



woodcock or young e rouse; in other words, they are what the chestnuts atd buffs bsimccizirg wordeifully well with the 

naturalists call precocious (P.fecoces). About the first of yellow grass sacng which it lives, and the shadows and 

September the full grown family turn their bills southward openings beneath the grass. 80 true is thi B that even when 

and jog aloug, at first by easy stages, toward their winter looked at directly the snipe is not likely to be seen on the 

home in the south. Usually, most of them hove passed on ground except by chance. I once saw one of these birds 

by the latter part of November, and if any remain at this feeding aloDg the edge of a little slough on the bare black 

time they are sure to be big, fat, heavy and delicious. I mud, where his color and his motion caught my eye at once, 

have killed them in December, when it was quite cold and A moment later the snipe saw me and walked quickly to the 

there was a thick skim of ice all over the ponds, but usually B ide of a tuft of grass, where it squatted close beside the gra<s 

the first sharp frost, by hardening the mud, closes up their stems, against which it could hardly be delected. I took my 

feeding grounds and forces them further along. Yet that eyes from it two or three times, and on looking at it again 

it is not the cold, but the lack of food, which obliges them was obliged to really search for it before I could make out 

to leave us is shown by the fact that in many places along the bird's outline. Of course, as my eyes became more 

the flanks of the Rocky mouHains and on the high plateau familiar with the spot and with the situation of the bird, I 

of the Laramie plains, where in winter the mercury often found it more and more easily each lime 



falls to -30 or -40 degrees Fahrenheit, a few snipe are regu. 
larly found during the winter about certain warm spring 
holes which never freeze. That if a bird has plenty of food 
it does not nsird a great degree of cold is still further em 
phaeixed by the fact that in this same region many ducks 
winter in all the warm pools and eddies which do not freeze. 

Snipe ere notorious for the uncertainty of their appear- 
ance and for the apparently causeless way in which they 
vanish again. No d ubt the two factors which influence 
them in these respects are the weather and food supply. If 



The protective coloring makes it often difficult to see a 
dead suipe lying on the ground, unless it has been closely 
marked down or has fallen on its back so that the white 
belly shows; and so a good retriever is a real help in snipe 
shooting, for he will find many birds that would otherwise 
be lost. Most men, unless they are in constant practice, 
grow careless about marking down their birds, a matter 
which at first requires keen attention and close observation. 
If these are applied intelligently for a time, the marking of 
the birds becomes at length more or less automatic, and is 



they come into a meadow which looks like a good feeding not a matter that one need think much about. As I said 

ground, and after having tested it find it barren, they in the article above referred to: " Without considerable 

promptly move on to some other ground. The snipe is a practice it is not easy to mark down a dead bird so accur- 

voracious bird like the woodcock, and the character of its ately that you can wain to it. This becomes especially diffi- 

food is such that it must be necessary for it to eat at very cult when several of the birds rise together, or nearly so, and 

frequent intervals. Its food consists very largely of earth you shoot first one and then another, and then, perhaps try 

worms and insects found among the grass on the wet mead- to mark down the remainder of the wisp. You have a gen- 



ows which it frequents. Like its cousio, the woodcock, it 
procures the chief portion of its sustenance by boring; that 
is to say, by probing the soft mud with its swollen tipped 
sensitive bill, by which it probably feels any motion in the 
soil, and thus detects the presence of its food. The nerves 
in the bill of the woodcock and snipe have been studied to 
some extent, and one may imagine that the heads of these 
two species would prove interesting subjects to the anatomist. 
Snipe in confinement have been known to eat bread and milk 
and corn meal. 

Although tbe snipe's erratic ways of coming and going are 
proverbial, it is yet not an easy matter to drive him away 
from a given place when he does not wish to go. He is an 
obstinate littie fellow, and when he has found a feeding 
ground that suits him, chasing him about over it is not likely 
to make him leave. It is a common experience to have a 
snipe get up wild before one and rise high in tbe air, as if 



eral idea of the direction in which the first one fell, and are 
sure that the second dropped close by a certain little bunch 
of grass; but when, after having strained your eyes after 
the living and marked them down, you turn your attention 
to the dead, you are likely to find yourself somewhat per. 
plexed. You see now that there are a dozen Utile bunches 
of grass near where the second bird fell, any one of which 
may be that by which you marked him; and as for the firet < 
you feel very hopeless about beicg able to go within twenty 
yards of where it dropped. So you may lose half an hour of 
valuable time in searching for (he dead. Practice in mark- 
ing and a quick eye will after awhile enable you to retrieve 
your own birds successfully. As a matter of fact there is 
always something — a bunch of grass a bit of drift stuff, a 
flower, a leaf, or a weed stalk — near your bird which is un- 
'ike anything else close to it; and you must see this olject 
whatever it is, and remember it in the instant's glance that 



intending to go a great distance, and then, after flying in you have." 



wide circles high above the meadow to see it, at length return 
and pitch down almost in the very spot from which it rose. 
It is not likely to do this unless the gunner stands perfectly 
still until it has alighted, and after its return a little time 
should be given it to begin to feed agsin, or else it mav rise 
once more and take its permanent departure. I recall an 
occtBion when I saw this attachment to locality exemplified 
at s me well known snipe grounds in Indiana, where by 
good fortune I found birds in great numbers. These ground B 
were not very extensive, but the great number of snipe made 
tbe shooting puzzling. We worked the marshes over two or 
three times until all tbe birds had gone, and then my com 
panion and I separated to explore the neighborhood in the 
two directions in which the birds had chiefly disappeared. 
I proceeded through a piece of dry woodland, thinking thai 
perhaps beyond it there m<ght be another marsh. To my 
astonishment, soon after I bad entered the woods, snipe be- 



During the winter the Southern States effer good snipe 
shooting. Many of tbe marshes lying along the bays and 
sounds, which extend from North Carolina to Florida, are 
favorite feeding grounds for these birds, and here they can 
usually be found in numbers. Perhaps tbe marshes of Norlh 
Carolina, along Currituck Sound, are tbe most northern 
points where snipe winter in considerable numbers, and even 
here they are not altogether permanent winter residen's, for 
tbey oscillate back and forth with ibe weather, appearing on 
the marshes when it is warm, and moving south again if a 
cold snap or freeze comes, only to reappear as the marshes 
grow soft once more On such marshes it is possible still lo 
have f . i r I y good snipe shooting now and then, th' ugh even 
there the birds are not nearly so plentiful as ihey were a few 
years ago; and here tbe northern gunner who has gone south 
for the duck shooting tramps for snipe on the lay days, which 
a wise legislature has provided by a statu'e, for tbe enforce- 
ment cf which it furnishes neither man nor money. 

There is no prettier sport than snipe shooting when the 
birds lie well, and none more tantal'zing when tbey act as 



gan to rise about me in all directions. Tbere must have they often do, giving you at rare intervals a long shot, and 



been hundreds of them. My companion crossed a high 
cultivated hill to see if beyond tbat there was a slough. 
When he reached tbe top of tbe bill, where tbere was a dry 
potato lot, snipe arose from every furrow tbat he a passed, and 
whirling about went back to the marsh we hsd just been 
sbootirg on. So it seems that, simple though he is thought 
to be, the snipe is wise enough when be is much harried on 
a favorite feeding ground to go away to some place where he 



then disappearing no ore knows where 

Most gunners who have fairly considered the snlj ct will 
agree, I think, that if we are to continue to have any snipe 
shooting, the season in all tbe States should close January 
let. In the Northern States this would mean that snipe 
shooting, like that of other game birds, should be confined to 
(be autumn montbs, and lhat when they arrive in the spring 
an. I are already mated tbe birds should not be disturbed, but 
allowed to continue their j >urney unmrlested, or to breed 
with us. Tbe faith in the necessity of putting an erd to 



jinny have to put away their guns for all time. 



would never be looked for, and there await tbe departure of spring shooting, if we are to continue to have any snipe or 
the disturber of bis peace. ' fowl, is growing slowly, and will before long become 

f general, and until this further limit is set on the use of the 
lo these days when snipe are scarce and hard to find, a '■■ gun. ducks and snipe will continue to diminish in numbers, 
good dog is sometimes very useful in saving much labDriousJjl Perhaps nine-tenths of the shooting done to-day is at inaoi- 

walking to the gunner, and in retrieving most of the birdsj8 ma,e ,ar « e,s ' and L . D J n,e « some earnest steps are taken to pre- 
. . .. , ., .Ciserve our game birds, those who care only for field shooting 

that be may kill. Moreover, there is no more beautiful*" 

place to see dogs work than tbe open meadows where snipe 

are usually found. On the other hand they of.en wholly 

decline to lie to a dog, getting up wild before hia> f and 

much further from the gun tban tbey otherwise woulr"; 01 

if they are very numerous they puzz'e and oonfoood the dogi 

by tbeir numbers and tbe fact tbat thev have pissed ove 

the ground in all directions. On the whole a dog is less us>. 

ful in snipe shooting than in the pursuit of any other bird 



The Game Law. 



The synopsis of the game laws appearing below and pub- 
ished in the Breeder and Sportsman for several years 
net has, from time to time been changed or the provisions 
f new ordinances added thereto bv reason of the many and 
I'arious changes in the county game and fish laws, particu 



larly those of recent date and of application in and around 
the bay counties. 

This synopsis has been frequently copied (in more or less 
garbled and incomplete form) and quoted by city and interior 
journals and has also been printed and distributed by busi- 
ness houses While tbe information given at the date of is- 
suance was substantially correct, we do not care to be held 
responsible for the circulation of old matter tbat is now in- 
correct in many details. Some complaint has been made in 
this respect and to avoid misunderstanding in the future it is 
suggested tbat for information of this character a reference 
be mtde to current numbers of tbe Brbeder and Sports 
man for the latest and most complete .data coneerning the 
Game Laws. 

The county enactments relative to the shipment of game 
have become inoperative under the decision of the Supreme 
Court of California, rendered December 6, 1899, in the case 
of James Knapp on habeas corpus, appealed from the 
Superior Court of Stanislaus county. 

The open season lor snooting quail, dovea, deer and wild duck as 
fixed oy the State law Is aa follows: Doves, 15th July to 15th Febru- 
ary. Mountain quail and grouse, 1st September to 15th February. 
Valley quail, wild duck and rail. lit October to 1st March. Male deer, 
15th July to 15th October. Pheasants, the taking, killing, selling or 
having in possession at any time il prohibited; robbiug or destruc- 
tion of nests or having pheasant eggs in possession is a misdemeanor 
in the following counties : Butte, Trinity, Marin, Lake. Merced- 
Riverside, Loe Angeles, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, Kings, Ven 
tura, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Joaquin, Yuba. 

Tbe clerks of nearly all the Boards of suoervisors have advised us 
no changes have been made this year, but the ordinances passed 
last year hold good if they do not conflict with the State law. The 
following counties nave not passed any ordinances that alter 
the open season as provided by State law : Amador. Butte, Inyo, 
Modoc, Mono, Mendocino, Mariposa, Nevada, Napa, Plumas, 
San Diego, Solano. Siskiyou, Tehama, and Yolo. 

The changes are as follows : 

Alpine— Deer. Sept. 2 to Oct. 15. 

Alameda— Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 1. Male deer. July 15 to Oct. 1 
Pheasants protected until February. 1904. Hunting, killing or hav- 
ing in possession for purpose of sale or shipment out of county: 
quail, bob white, partridge, wild duck, rail, mountain quail, grouse, 
dove, does or deer, antelope, elk or mountain sheep prohibited. 

Colusa— Deer, Aug. 15 to Oct. 15. 

Calaveras— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 16. 

Contra Costa— Deer, July 20 to 8ept. 2. (Use of dogs prohibited). 

Kl Dorado— Doves, July 20 to Feb. L Trout, June 1 to Dec. 1. 

Fresno— Valley quatl. Nov. 1 to Jan. 31. Individual bag limited to 
25 quail per day. Mountain quail, Sept. 1 to Feb. 15. Doves, Aug 15 
to Feb 15. Pheasants, bob whit* quail and prairie chickens, close 
season in for e for an indefinite pe riod. Use of nets or seines in 
county warers|prohibited. Shipment of game from county prohibited. 

Glenn— Deer, veuisou, dried venison, oeer skin, buck, doe or fawn; 
quail, grouse, pheasant, dove, plover, snipe or wild duck, shipping or 
taking out of the county prohibited 25 blrda per year individual 
limit to be takeu from tbe county upon licensed permission. 

Humboldt— urouse and Wilson snipe, sent. 1 to Keo. Id. Killing of 
waterfowl prohibited between one-half hour after minuet and one 
half honr before sunrise. Pheasants and wild turkeys protected 
uu'ilOct. 1, 19O0. Black brant, Oct. 1 to March 1. Shipment of game 
out of the county prohibited. Deer, use of dogs prohibited. Striped 
bass— Close season until Jan. 1, 1905 

Kern — Shipping game out of the county prohibited. Quail, Oct. 1 
to Feb 1 Bronze Ibis or curlew— Robbing or destroying nests or 
taking eggs, prohibited. 

Kings— Doves, Sept. 1 to Feb. 15. Quail, Nov. 1 to Fet. 15. 

Lake— Deer. Aug. 1 to Oct. 1. 

Los Angeles— Male deer, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. Valley quail, bob 
white or mountain quail, Dec ltojan.l. Doves, July 15 to Oct. 1. 
Shooting for sale, or shipment of quail, bob-white, partridges, pheas- 
ants, grouse, doves, ducks, rallB or other game protected by statute, 
prohibited. Ducks, individual bag limited to 25 biros per day. 
Shipping game to marxei* ouulde ot thecouutv prohibited. Sea- 
gulls, e*rets, pellcanB, seals, protected. Trout Reason opens April 1 st. 

Marin— Deer, July 15 to Sept. 15. Quail, partridge or grouse, Oct. 15 
toJan.15 Individual bag limited to 25 birds per day. Markethuuting 
and shipment of game from the county Is prohibited Use of 
Repeating shot guns prohibited. Killing of meadow larks or 
any other song birds prohibited. Hunting within private enclosure* 
or ou public-roads prohibited. Trout, with book and line only, Aprl 1 
to Oct. 15. 

Madera— Market hunting prohibited. 

Monterey— Deer, July 15th to Sept. 1st. (Use of dogs prohibited). 
Quail, Oct. 1 to Feb. 1. Shipping or taking game out of the county 
prohibited. 

Napa— Trout, by hook and line only. April 1 to Dec. 1. 

Orange— Doves, Aug. 1 to Feb. 1. Deer. Aug. in to Oct. 1. (Market 
hunting prohibited). Quail, partridges or grouse. Oct. 1 to Oct. 6. 
Ducks, Nov. 1 to March 1. Ducks and quail, shipment from tbe 
county restricted as follows: No person shall ship ducks or quail 
out of tbe county in quantities to exceed two dozen birds a week. 
Market hunting prohibited. 

Placer— Trout, lune 1 to Dec. 1. 

Plumas— Salmon, trout, May 1 to Dec. 1 (netting prohibited.) 

Riverside— Male deer, close season until July 16, 1901. July 16 to 
Sept. 15, thereafter. Quail, Individual bag limited to 20 bl.ds per 
dav. Mountain or valley quail, pheasant and wild duck, sale of pro- 
hibited in tbe county wild duck, valley or mountain quail, ship- 
ment from county prohibited. Trout, any variety, close season until 
May 1, 1901. May 1 to Dec. 1, thereafter. 

Sacramento Quail, ducks, doves, pheasants; shooting for sale and 
market out of couuty prohibited. Taking or shipping out of county 
of more tban ten birds in one day by any person prohibited 

San Benito— Deer. Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. Market hunting and ship- 
ment of game out of county prohibited Quail, partridge or grouse, 
Oct. 15 to Feb. 1. Individual bag limited to 30 birds per day. 
Mountain quail, perpetual close season. Trout, April 1 to Oct. 15. 

san Bernardino— Deer, July 15 to Sept 15;(close season continuous, 
1899.) Valley or mountain quail, wild duck, sale of and shipment 
out of couuty prohibited. Trout, catching or sale of, between April 
1st aud May 1st of any year and during 1899, prohibited. Tree 
squirrels, five per day the Individual limit. 

San Diego— Shi ppi .g game out of the county prohibited. 

San J aquln— Shipping or takiug game out of the county pro- 
hibited, shootiug ou public road prohibited. 

San Luis Obispo— Deer, July 15 to Sept. 1. Use of bounda prohib- 
ited Doves, July 15 to Dec. 1. Hunting for markets situated outside 
ol the county prohibited. Clams, use of plows or machines In digging 
prohibited. Shipment of abalones out of the county prohibited. 

San Mateo — Deer, Aug. 1 to Sept. 1~>. (Use of dogs not prohibited. 
Market bunting prohibited). Rail. Oct. 15 to Nov I. (Shooting from 
boat at high tide prohibited). Quail, Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. 

Santa Barbara— Deer, Aug. 1 to Aug 22. Use of hounds pro- 
hibited. Quail. Nov. 1 to March 1. Dove', Aug. 15 to Feb. 15. 
Market hnuting and sale of game in the county prohibited. Lobsters 
or crawfish, close season, April 15 to Aug. 15, shipping from county 
in close season prohibited. Abalones, taking, selling, having In 
possession and shipping from the county prohibited. Clams can not 
be dug till July. 1902 

Sauia Clara— Male deer, July 16 to Oct. 15. Valley or mountain 
quail, Nov. l to Feb. 1. Individual bag limited to 20 birds per day, 
Quail, pheasants and doves, purchase and sale, or shipment out of, 
or into the county prohibited. Wild duck, purchase and sale, or 
shipment out of county of ducks killed In the county prohibited. (In 
force Nov 9). 

Santa Cruz— Shipping game from the couuty prohibited 
Shasta— Deer, July 16 to Sept. 1. Shipment of feathered game out 
of tbe county prohibited. 
Sierra— Deer. Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Siskiyou— Shipment of feathered game outot the county prohibited. 

Sonoma— Deer. July 15 to Oct. L Quail, Nov. L to Feb. 1 Pheas- 
ants, close season till Jan 1, 1904. Shipping game out of the county, 
hunting within private enclosures, prohibited. Use of nets In streams 
ot the county prohibited. 

8tanlslau«— Wild ducks, dove, quail or snipe, shipment from the 
couuty prohibited. 

Sutter— Deer. Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. Dovea, July 16 to Jan. 1. 

Trinity— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Tulare— Deer. Sept. 1 to Oot. 16. 8hlpplng game ont ot the county 

prohibited. 

woT.Hir»_Qnail. anv va'lory. Oct 1 to Nov I, Hunting for sale 
or market of quail, grouse, dove, wild duck, deer or mountain sheep 
prohibited, except between Oct. 10th and 16th. 

Yuba— Shipping ducks and quail from the county to market pro- 
hibited. 



January 20, 1900] 



<£Jj* gvee&ex emit &pcnrt*mcctu 



43 




Doming Events 



New 



BENCH SHOWS. 

Feb. 20— 23— Westminster Kennel Club. 24th annual show. 
York. James Mortimer, sup't. 

FIELD TRIALS. 

Kentucky Field Trial Association. Inaugural trials 

Ky. H. D Newcomb, sec'y. 

South Carolina Game Protective and Field Trial Associa- 
tion. Inangujal tiials f. C. W. G. Jeffords, sec'y. 

Jan. 22. 1900— United States Field Trials Club. West Point, Miss. 
W. B Stafford, sec'y. 

Champion Field TrialB Association's aanual trials. Wes 

Point, Miss. (Following U. S. Trials). W. B. Stafford, 6ec'y. 

Jan 22, 1900— Pacific Coast Field Trials. 17th annual trials 
Bakersfield. J. E. de Ruvter, sec'y. 

Feb. 5. 1900— Alabama Field Trials Club. 4th annual trials. Green- 
Tille. T. H. Spencer, sec'y. 

Feb. — , 19(0— Texas Held Trial Club. 4th annual trials. 

Tex, G. A. Chabot, sec'y-treas 

A Dog Lover. 



Mr. Carnochan of Riverdale-on-Hudsoo, New York, who 
recently sent that good young fox terrier, Cairnsmuir Doctor, 
to Mr. Hemmelright, of this city, was somewhat chagrined 
that Doctor did not take a first in Oakland last month. He 
was just a fringe out of condition and a little light in'fieab, 
but however, it is the opinion of many fox terrier men that 
Doctor should have been placed over Victoria Wanderer. We 
venture to predict that this reversal will take place if the 
two dogs come together at the May show in this city. 

Sensation, a natty fox terrier bitch owned by the Califor- 
nia Jockey Club Kennels, was shipped to New York on 
Thursday, she will be bred to G. M. Carnochan's famous 
crack Claude Duval. This breeding will be of the greatest 
importance to fox terrier oircles on the Coast. Kensation is 
by Warren Safeguard out of Blemton Spinaway, both favor- 
ably known dogs to the fancy here. Mr. CarnochaD, with 
the true spirit of a sportsman and enthusiastic breeder, gen- 
erously (Iters to receive and take charge -of Sensation until 
the proper time for breeding her to Duval. This grand stud 
terrier has a record of over 300 firsts and specials in Eng- 
land, He easily carried first in novice, limit and winners' 
classes at the New York bench show and also the $50 prize 
for best puppy sired by him in 1899. 



I am none of your dog cranks. No sir-eel 

I love a good dog, I avow; 
Bull don't have a spasm of Joy when I see 

Any sort of an old bow-wow. 
There are dogs that are good and dogs that are bad, 

And dogs that no man would claim; 
So my gold I'll invest in the very best, 

And leave others the mangy and lame. 

Quite few are the breeds that my kennels hold; 

Of pointers and terriers a score; 
Spaniels, St. Bernards and mastiffs bold, 

FoxhoundB— a dozen or more- 
Terriers— Irish and Boston and Scotch, 

Bulldogs with jaws like a trap, 
Beagles that stand at the ten-inch notch, 

Pugs you could hide in your cap 

Beautiful dachshunds with sawhorse legs; 

Borzois, Dalmatians and Skyes. 
Mexicans— bare as a basket of eggs— 

And a few other breeds that I prize; 
But I'm no silly dog crank, please understand, 

There are curs that I wouldn't possess— 
For they're held at a price that I can't command 

And their owners won't sell them for less. 

—Roger Reed in Sportsmen's Review. 



The following story has its origin in hunting circles in 
England: A cunning old fox had been well hunted and 
eventually got away. Some time afterwards a passer-by saw 
a dead beat fox slowly making his way across a ploughed 
field, followed by three hounds. The quartette were thor- 
oughly licked, and the fox being unable to go further lay 
down, when the dogs by a supreme (Sort struggled up to the 
fox and lay down also. Whrt would have happened when 
the animals recovered we are unable to say, but the 
story ends with a farmer corning up and bagging the fox. 
Now this story has been everywhere ridiculed as most 
improbable, and it has even been suggested that fox- 
hunters have entered into competition with anglers, and 
made a desperate effort to deprive them of their world- 
wide reputation. It is, however, believed that such an 
incident might hi.ve occurred, as something very sim- 
ilar is reported to have taken place in Wales. An 
old sheepdog who had been a keen hunter of bares in his 
day, in process of time became still, and could not follow the 
hares which frequented his hill with the celerity of his 
youthful days. He, however, was as keen as ever, but the 
hares, in consequence of his infirmities, were able to scoff 
at all his efforts to catch them, and in fact would amble a 
little distance and wait for the old dog to come up, and 
then resume tbeir tantalizing antics. This old sheepdog has 
been seen to trot after a hare, and when blown has sat up on 
his haunches, the hare doing the same, and the two animals 
would gaze at each other at only a few yards distance, until 
the dog recovered his wind. The old dog is still alive, and 
still amuses himself, and doubtless the hares of the hill also, 
with these many games of "catch if you can." 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



The height at shoulder of a well-grown Gordon setter 
should be about 23 inches or over; weight, when fully ma- 
tured, about 65 pounds. 

The Christmas number of the English Stock Keeper is an 
issue full of most interesting reading illustrated by a number 
of very excellent pictures. 



Yon may breed from your fox terrier bitch the first time 
she comes in season with safety. If it were injurious Na ure 
would have ordained otherwise. 



Eastern sporUmen are been to recognize the value of Cb. 
Count Gladstone IV. as a sire of field trial performers. The 
demand for puppies sired by this grand dog is greater than 
can be filled at present. 

A well known Dunedin solicitor had a curious adventure 
on the 8t. Clair beach one morning recently, relates the 
New Zealand Star. He was walking along, accompanied by 
his son and fox terrier. The latter was swimming in the 
suif, when he descried a sea gull struggling with a fieh. Tbe 
gull rose, carrying the fish a considerable distance along the 
surface of the sea, and then dropped it into the water again. 
The terrier followeH, swam into the sea, drove the gull away, 
and brought the fish to shore It proved to be a mullet 
about a foot long, and was still alive. The dog was given it 
for his breakfast as a reward for his plucky conduct. 



The Pomeranian. 



Geo. Richards is still hard at work getting the Verona 
Kennels string of setters now located at Sparta, Msss., in 
shape for the Eastern field trial circuit. Tbe dogs are all 
in the pink of condition and rapidly becoming familiar with 
the requirements and work necessary to make them eligible 
for "tartiog in Eastern trials. Senator P. is doing some most 
promising work and will give the Eastern cracks a "strong 
run for the money" notwithstanding the handicap be will be 
under by reason of his lack of field trial experience. The 
young pointer Sam's Bow shows great improvement and has 
a wondrous faculty of learning quickly the work cut out for 
him. Richards has great faith in this bright son of Plain 
Sam. 

The trials of the Pacific Coast Field Trials Club commenc- 
ing at Bakersfied on Monday will be a notable one in the 
history of Coast field trials. Tbe attendance of sportsmen 
promises to be a large one. Tbe majority of the gentlemen 
interested in the trials will proceed to BakersfJeld to-day. 
Mr. Thomas Johnson, who will officiate as judge, will prob- 
ably arrive there to-day coming direct from tbe East and 
will not stop over in this city until the meeting is over. 
Birds are reported to be in sufficient numbers to meet field 
trial requirements. Cover since tbe recent rains is ample in 
the moat favorable localities selected for tbe dogs. It will 
probably take four days or more to run tbe four events on 
the program. The Members and Champion Stakes, it seems, 
will have a larger number of dogs entered than was antici- 
pated several weeks ago. Entries for these two stakes close 
the evening before tbey will be run. 8choolboy, an English 
setter youngster entered in the Derby by Verona Kennels, 
we are informed, will probably not be started. 



This handsome and sprightly little breed which has been 
on the top wave of popularity in Eneland for several years 
past has at last become quite the fashion in Eastern doggy 
circles. At tbe recent bench show of the Pet Dog Club in 
New York the entry was a marvelous one for a first real ex- 
hibit of tbe breed in the United States; one of the sensations 
of the exhibit being the Lakewood Kennel with twelve good 
specimens of the breed shown; winning eighteen prizes in a 
competition of fifty-one entries. 

That Poms are* great favorites in this city, as well as else- 
where on the Coast, is evidenced by the many good speci- 
mens seen. The whiles seem to be the dominant color, and 
it is also noticeable that our dogs seem to be a little large r 
than the toy Poms which are now being taken up so seriously 
among the lovers of pet dog* in the East, particularly ladies- 
The points of the breed not being so well known out 
here, a few extracts from the latest edition of R. B. Lee's 
"Modern Dogs" will convey an idea as to the proper thing 
in the breed according to the English standard. 

The Pomeranian, says Rawdon B. Lee, has from time to 
time been known and recognized under many different 
names, as the Spitz, Loup-Loup, Pomeranian, Wolf dog, Fox 
dog, and may be by others. There is little doubt that he 
more nearly approaches in appearance, and in a certain shy- 
ness, which occasionally prevails in some specimens, such 
anti-domestic animals as the dogs of the Arctic regions in- 
cluding the Samoyedes and the smaller varieties of the 
Esquimaux; than any other of our European dogs. One Of 
the Samoyedes owned by H. R. H. the Prince of Wales very 
much resembles a white Pomeranian excepting in coat, which 
on the first named is comparatively shoit as compared with 
that of the other. 

The Pomeranian, or Spitz dog, as it whs until recently 
called, was no doubt originally brought from Pomerania, a 
country which lies on the shores of the Baltic Sea. When 
he first became acclimated with us there is nothing to show; 
that he has been one of ub for a number of years there is no 
doubt whatever. 

Until within the past half dozen years or bo, the white 
Pomeranian was the only variety known to any great extent 
in this country, and this was a purely white dog some 20 lb. 
or bo in weight. He did not bear a great reputation for 
amiability, and his best friends could not say that he was 
anything more than snappish and particularly ill-tempered 
with children and with strangers. Some few years ago there 
was a mad dog scare in New York, and in official quarters 
the origin was said to be traced to Spitz dogs, a great many 
being destroyed without any proof being forthcoming either 
one way or the other. Still, I do not think it was altogether 
on account of their ill-temper that they have never popular- 
ised themselves in this country, but white specimens of ex- 
cellence were most difficult to produce, especially when ac- 
companied by dark hazel eyes and a perfectly black nose. 



Fawn or fallow marks on the ears were continually appear- 
ing, and red noses were far more common than black ones. 
Then there was the difficulty in washing and in getting them 
up for show, in which latter respect white doge are always 
more troublesome than colored ones. 

Classes have been provided for the variety at early shows 
but they were, as a rule, badly filled, and continued to be so 
until recently. Still, in tbe first volume of the "Keane 
Club Stud Book," they are allowed a classification, and no 
fewer than forty-three dogs and bitches were entered, a large 
msjority of which have no pedigre- whatever, nor is any- 
thing said to their being bred abroad. These early Pomer- 
anians were, I take it, in the bands of ,>rivate individuals, 
who took no trouble to keep records of tbe puppies so far as 
either sire or dam was concerned. Twenty-five years or so 
ago, in most cases the Pomeranians had to compete in the 
variety classes, and perhaps the most notable dog, and the 
handsomest of I, is day, was Mr. J. W. Fawdyrey's Charlie; 
but since then seueral excellent spscimens have been intro- 
duced, notably those from the kennels of Miss Creswell. 

A great charjge has, however, been recently brought about 
in the Pomeranian so far as this country is concerned; the 
whi es have had their noses put out of joint, their places be- 
inj more than supplied bv the black specimens, and others 
fawn or pale red in color, chocolate or brown, blue or slate 
colored, and occasionally these hues are diversified by parti- 
colored specimens. I do not believe that all these Pomeran- 
ians of different colors recently produced, have sprung from 
one stock, whatever may have been the case a hundred or 
more years ago. Most of these charming black, or blue, or 
red, or chocolate specimens are much smaller than the orig- 
inal whites, 4lb. and 61b. weight each being unusual, and 
moreover these "toys" are not Bnappish and ill-natured, 
their temperament and disposition being more what one likes 
to see in a companionable dog. 

Five years ago I wrote that these comparatively few vari- 
eties, at any rate new to this country, had a future before 
'hem, for they were in enthusiastic hands, and a specialist 
club had been formed (in 1891) to look after their interests 
which is giving particular attention to the smaller varieties. 
Her Majesty the Queen had a companionable and handsome 
little fellow, a beautiful red sable called Marco, and the late 
Right Hon. W. E. Gladstone's favorite dog was a little black 
specimen which gloried in the name of Petz. That my 
words have come true is plainly in evidence, for at all the 
leading shows to day Pomeranians are provided with an im- 
mense number of classes, which are proportionately filled. 
At the 1897 show of the Ladies' Kennel Association thirty, 
eight classes were provided, which obtained over 160 entries, 
a nd the entries in the "Stud Book" have increased fully as 
much in proportion. 

This extraordinary increase in the popularity of the variety 
>s easily accounted for by the introduction from Germany and 
the Continent of the smaller specimens, which are classified 
a s toys. These, mostly black in color, are much the rage as I 
write this, and a few months ago £250 was paid for a little 
dog called Black Prince, which had been successfully shown 
hy Mr. C. Houlker. This is a record price for the variety 
and although he weighed only 61b , smaller have been ex- 
hibited, and I have seen one or two which would not scale 
more than 31b. weight. However, even a moderate specimen 
black, or sable, or fawn or white, of not more than 61b. in 
weight, will always command an excessive price. These 
little dogs appear hardy, and being by no meaus so difficult 
to rear as other "lap" dogs, their increase in numbers and in 
popularity is not surprising. As to the price stated above 
paid for Black Prince, it may be said it has seldom been ex- 
ceeded for a toy dog of any description the most notable 
exception being when, not long ago, Mr. A. Howard sold his 
pug bitch Chotee for £300. 



Kennel Aegristry. 



Visits, Sales, Whelps and Names Claimed published In this column 
free of charge. Please use the following form : 
WiiELPS. 

Ed. Schultze's Great Dane bitch Adgie (Lord Londes- 
brough — Flora) whelpee December 15, 1899, thirteen 
puppies — 10 dogs — to C. G. Saxe's Defender (Hector — 
Mabel N.) 

J. L. Cunningham's Great Dane bitch Champion Juanita 
(Htrohm— Queen C.) whelped December 4, 1899, twelve 
puppies — 6 dogs — to Enterprsse Kennels' King R (Prince — 
Queen R.) 

SALES. 

Humboldt Kennels sold a rough coat St. Bernard puppy by 
Alto Milo— Fanny of Hauenstein to J. Dalzell Brown. 
Also a puppy same litter to J. Schroder. 

VISITS. 

Chas. Bergman's rough coat Bt. Bernard bitch Lady Ro?a 
(Ch. California Bernardo— Lady Delight) to Mrs. C. G. 
Saxe's King Menelek (Keglov — Empress Frances) December 
31, 1899. 

S. Birkholm's rough coat St. Bernard bitch Lady Snooks 
(Ch. California Bernardo — Nellie Bland) to Mrs. C. G. 
Saxe's King Menelek (Reglov — Empress Frances) December 
1, 1899. 

Miss Diamond's rough coat St. Bernard bitch Belle of 
Meligna (Lord Hualya — Lady Bute) to Mrf, C. G. Saxe's 
King Menelek (Keglov — Empress Frances) December 
19. 1899 

Verona Kennels' English setter bitch Daisy Craft ( Antonio 
— Daisy Hunter) to same owner's Ch. Count Gladstone IV. 
(Noble— Ruby's Girl) January 14, 1900. 

Verona Kennels' English setter bitch Gleam's Ruth (Ch. 
Count Gladstone IV— Gleam's Maid) to same owner's Iro- 
quois Chief (Antonio — Can Can) January 3, 1900. 



44 



[January 20, 1900 



THE FARM. 



Importance of Testing the Herd 

An old farmer once said to us: "Why on 
earth do you keep 6ring away at us about 
testing our cowa and keeping a record?" 

"Well," we replied, because we see what a 
lot of money is wasted by you and other men 
in keeping cows that you know scarcely any- 
thing about." 

To this he gave a contemptuous snort and 
said: " What nonesenst I Do you suppose a 
man can live with a cow for two or three 
years and not have a good judgment as to 
whether she is a profitable cow or not? 

We replied that we not only supposed but 
we knew that hundreds and thousands of 
such farmers and such instances existed. 

He further asked if we supposed that a 
man could go into a farmer's barn yard and 
pick out his best cow and the farmer not 
know whether she was that kind of a cow or 
not? 

We told him that we thought we could do 
that very thing in his own herd; that we 
could pick out cows which he greatly under- 
valued as to their merit as compared with 
some other cows in his herd, and could find 
others which he greatly over-valued. 

A vear or more after that conversation en- 
sued, a son of this farmer, who had been a 
Short Course 8tudent at the Wisconsin Agri- 
cultural College, concluded to test his father's 
herd by the scales and the Babcock test. He 
first took his father's judgment as to which 
were the best cows. A record of the pounds 
of milk fo/ six months was kept, together 
with the test for butter fat once each week. 

The test showed that there were six cows 
in the herd which his father thought were 
below par, which made from 50 to 120 pounds 
of butter each more than six of the cows he 
thought were the very best. The test was a 
revelation to the father, and he has had noth 
ing to Shy againtt testing cows since. This 
incident shows how valuable it was to this 
man that he had a goor 1 , bright boy who had 
taken in a little valuable knowledge in this 
particular. It would be a grand thing if 
many other farmers would serve themselves 
in the same way by sending their sons to the 
Short Course or Dairy School. 

In the Bulletin of the Uaited States De- 
partment of Agriculture on 'The Dairy 
Herd," Maj Alvord relates the following: 

"A dairyman of wide reputation, president 
of a State association for years, concluded to 
adopt the daily milk record rather because 
of those who advocated it than of any con- 
viction of needing it himself His herd was 
of his own breeding, he had bandied every 
cow from its birth, and he and his sons did 
the milking. 

Before beginning the record be made note 
of the joint opinion of himself and som — <s 
to the half dozen best cows in the herd, anil 
an estimate of their season's milk yield. 
When the year's record was completed it was 
found that in order of acual merit, the cows 
stood as follows: The best cow was the fifth in 
the estimate; the second, a cow not on h\« 
list; the third was the fourth on the list; the 
fourth was the first; the fifth was his sixth; 



the sixth, a cow not in his estimate; and his 
second and third in previous estimate were 
way down on the list. These facts were 
borne out by subsequent records and the man 
who had called himself a good dairyman, was 
forced to the conclusion that one-fourth of 
his cows were being kept at an actual less 
while the others barely paid their way." — 
Hoard's Dairyman. 

The Oattle Outlook. 



Louis Gerber, who is feeding a large num 
ber of mutton sheep and beef cattle on the 
Lost River range in Oregon for the. California 
market, does not think that prices will remain 
at the present high figure. He says: "Beef is 
not as high as ; t w s during the summer and 
autumn months, and the feeders will find the 
profits on the wrong side of the ledger. 

The heavy fall of rain in California during 
the fall months has started vegetation of all 
kinds and from all advances received from 
Southern California there will be an absence 
of grass beef cattle by the latter part of 
February. 

A great many cattle have been shipped to 
the southern counties from Arizona and 
Mexico during the last two months. 

While I don't look for cattle to take a big 
tumble, there will be a general decline in 
prices for the next five years. 

I look for two year olds to bring about $25 
next year. That is a very good price and it 
is a good business at that figure. 

The local consumption of beef in the San 
Francisco, Oakland and Sacramento markets 
has fallen off fully 25 per cent, for the present 
season compared with previous years. 

It is true that there were fully as many 
cattle slaughtered in San Francisco during 
1899 and probably more, but this was caused 
by the immense amount of both fresh and 
canned meats which the government sent on 
the transports to the Philippines. 

When beef is hign as it has been during the 
past year, the working people who are really 
the consumers, buy other food as a sub- 
stitute. 

I don't want to leave the impression, how- 
ever, that cattle will be down to any low fig- 
ure for some time, but one who has observed 
conditions for over 30 years and has seen 
these ups and downs in the live stock business 
it does not take long to figure out the 
problem. 

We have a population on this whole coast 
of two million people, not as many inhabi- 
dant as there are in the city of New York, 
and with the states of California, Oregon, 
Nevada and Arizona to draw from and every- 
body anxious to get into the butioess it takes 
but a short time to have a surplus. 

W becever the eastern market does not 
j uslify the buying of cattle from Eastern 
Nevada it takes but a short time to be over- 
stocked. However we will compare notes in 
three years and see how much I miss my cal- 
culations." 

Mr. Geo. Bement, one of California's pion- 
eer stock breeders, advertises thoroughbred 
Essex hogs for sale. His Essex stock captu-ed 
six first premiums out of seven offered at the 
State Fair laBt year, and won four sweepstakes. 
His address is East Oakland, Cal. 



Feeding for Choice Beef. 

The three essential points in the beef- 
producing animal are quality, quantity and 
cost of production. The first is required in 
order to get the highest or best paying price. 
There must be size or the animal cannot be 
made up to sufficient weight at an early or 
paying age. The cost of production depends 
upon the animal's ability to assimilate the 
food at the feeder's command, for if there is 
oot a goodly balance between the cost of the 
eed consumed and the price obtained the 
object sought will be lost, or in other words 
there is little interest in an undertaking that 
v ill not furnish the dollar at the end of the 
row. 

Beef production begins with the breeder. 
He dictates the cross that produces the steer. 
Here the best lire obtainable among the beef 
breeds is none too good. Not only must the 
sire be of the best strain of breeding or bred 
after the line of beef production, but he should 
be individually an animal of larger scale, all 
his beef points filled with natural flesh, which 
is determined by his straight outline together 
with allownes; of touch or handling quality 
which requires experience to distinguish. 
The perfect beef animal grows a depth of 
flesh from which the highest-priced joints of 
beef are to be cut. From the back, porter- 
house steak and the beat rib roasts are taken, 
therefore this part of the carcass must develop 
the greatest wealth of flesh. We must also 
see to it that our beef animal is a kindly 
keeper that his food turns to flesh, that he 
grows rapidly, heDce it is necessary that this 
pait of bis frame is correspondingly well put 
together. His chest must be wide, standing 
well apart on his foiel gs, that (hire ruu t be 
plenty of room for his vital and d gfSli'e 
organs; to this may be added a fullness at 
flanks, nice »oft handling hair and bide, all of 
which denote the kindly keeper. Such band- 
some appearance acd true outline make up 
the peifsct beef animal — Faim and Home. 



The Jersey cow Torono's Lillian 13780, 
born July 11, 1896, and owned at Hood Farm, 
Lowell, Mass., dropped calf November 3d, 
and for seven days ending December 10th 
gave milk as fellows: 35 lb. 5 cz , 36 lb. 13 
oz., 36 lb. 5 oz., 36 lb. 10 oz , 37 lb. 5 oz., 36 
lb. 6 cz. and 37 lb. 7 oz — a total for the week 
of 225 lb. 3 oz. This churned 15 lb. 6 oz. 
marketable butter, on the economical daily 
ration of 3 lb. bran, 1 lb. corn meal, 24 lb t 
ground oafs, 1 lb. oil meal, A lb. cottonseed 
meal, 30 lb. ensilage and what hay she would 
eat. 



V. L. 8mock, a stock dealer of Monroe 
county, Mo., has just returned from Cape 
Town, where he disposed of a cargo of mules 
which he took over on a venture He says 
the demand for mules and horses for army 
purposes is away above the supply, and likely 
to remain so for many months. For a man 
with sufficient capital to buy and ship mules, 
South Africa is beyond doubt the finest field 
in the world. Good amies can be bought in 
Missouri at $50 to $80. It cost, on an aver- 
age, {65 to ship them to Cape Town, and 
every animal that arrives in good shape will 
easily sell for 100 per cent, above the costs. 
It took 38 days to ship this stock from New 
York to Cape Town. The animals soon got 
used to their surroundings, and were really 
in better shape at the end of the trip than at 
the beginning. The prices realized were from 
$200 for "common, little mules" to (500 and 
$600 for the best stock. Cecil Rhodes bought 
seven jacks for $5712, or an average of $816. 

Here is a recipe for a paint that can be 
made on the farm and is cheap and durable; 
rain will not affect it in the least — it is per- 
fectly water-proof; and you can 'color it with 
any pigment you please: Water, 16 oz.; com- 
mon glue, 8 oz ; bichromate potassium, 1} oz. 
Soak the glue in 16 oz. water till soft; then 
heat over a gentle heat till dissolved; add the 
bichromate potash and your color, and be sura 
you don't boil or burn it, or you spoil it. 
Apply while hot. 




• FlnKftl, Barnea Co., N. D., March 19, 1898. • 

• Dear Sirs I have used your Kendall's Spavin Cure and 1* 
m think it a good Liniment. 1 have cured a Spavin on my beat z 

• mare, and I would not take (125 for ber, which I offered for (75 a, 

• before. I will be pleased to bave your book and receipts for • 

• this inclosed stamp, as I read on the cartoon. * 

Tr .lv nan, FRANK SMITH. J 

• It is an absolutely reliable remedy for spavin., m 

• SpllnKCorbs, Ringbones, ete. Removes the bunch and • 

• leaves no near. Price, $1; sli for #&. As a liniment • 
5 for family use It has no equal. Ask your drugKlst 5 

• for KENDALL'S SPAVIN ( I RK, also "A Treatise on the • 

• Horse," the book free, or address • 
J DR. B. J. KENDALL CO., ENOSBURQ FALLS, VT. • 
•••••»»»•••••»••••••»»••••••»»••••»••»» 




QUINNS OINTMENT 

FOR HORSES 

stands at the head of all veterinary remedies. Such troubles 
as Spavins, Curbs, Windpuffs, Splints. Bunches have no 
i§ terrors for a horse if the master keeps and applies Quinu's Ointment. All 
3f well-known horsemen speak of it in the highest terms : 

rjf Miller * Sibley, of Franklin, Pa., owners of St. Bel, brother of late Bell Boy, write, "We have 
tej- Y VS''d Onion's Ointment with £*rent success anil believe i* fulfills all claimed for it. We cheer- 
sjl fully recommend it to our friends." For Curbs, Splints, Spavins or Bunches, it ha s no e q ual. 

jij Price $1,501 Sold by all druggists or sent by mail. 
1 W. B. EDDY <t? CO.. WHITEHALL, N. Y. 




BUSINESS 
TELEPHONES 




Reduced from lO^per Day 



January 20, 1900] 



45 



Dairy Notes. 



One of the e'and problems for the dairy- 
man is the obtaining good help on the dairy 
farm. He needs a man who can milk quickly 
and quietly, without losing his temper and 
beating and abusing the cow, if at some time 
she does not stand quietly or if she persists in 
hitting him across the face with her tail. He 
needs a man who has good judgment in feed- 
ing, and is quick to notice any trouble or ill- 
ness in the cows he has the care of or that 
be milks. The man must be neat and cleanly 
about bis work, and he mu9t be reliable, so 
that, sickness or accidents excepted, he will 
be on hand every day and at regular hours 
every day. 

Of course, if the farmer is all this himself, 
he tan train men to do as he would have them 



do, or, at least, to do as long as he is within 
eight and hearing If be could be Mire of 
alwavs being at band himself, he could do as 
many have done, take a man who was not just 
what he wanted, and by careful oversight 
teach him what to do and how to do it, and 
sre that he did as he was told, but not every 
man can, if he wishes, be on hand night and 
morning for 3G5 davs in a year for as many 
years as it will take him to get rich enough 
to retire from the dairy business. When he 
finds such a man, he should keep him as long 
as possible and pay him good wages, and we 
would suggest to some of our young men that 
there i re abundant openings on dairy farms 
for those who will fit themselves for the busi- 
ness. They need not only to learn the art of 
milking and caring for the cows, but they 
must cultivate neatness, patience and punctu 
ality. 



CLOSING OUT SALE 



OF ALL THE ■ 



Race Horses in Training 



BELONGING TO ■ 



J. Naglee Burk, Esq. 

Consisting of 24 Head, including 

Giro, Glissando, Festoso, Coda, Espirando, Gusto, Fura, and 
sons and daughters of imp. Brutus, imp. Foul Shot, Cres- 
cendo, Drum Major, Brioso, Wildidle, etc. All are in train- 
ing at the track. 

These horses are to be sold without reserve as the owner is 
retiring from racing and intends to engage exclusively in 
the business of holding sales of yearlings every winter. 

SALE WILL TAKE PLACE AT 

OAKLAND RACE TRACK 

Thursday, January 25th, 1900. 

Commencing at 11:15 o'clock, sharp. 

WM. Q. LAYNQ, Auctioneer. 



Catalogues now ready. 



Office: 721 Howard St., San Francisco. 



For Sale 



Sired by the Greatest Son of George WilkeB. 
by the Greatest Living Sire. 

RED NUTTLE 



Dam 



Si 



:,:t. r » 



Bay stallion, foaled May, 1892. Sired by the 
mighty Red Wilkes Dam Nutila (dam of Red Nut- 
tltrjg 2:11^) by Nutwood, the king of livine trotting 
sires; second dam Hlldegarde bv Harold 1'3, sire of 
Maud B. 2:08%, etc ; third dam Betay Irotwood by 
Idol 177 (son of Mambrino Chief) ; fourth dam 
Pllotta by Glasgow's Pilot (son of Pilot Jr 12); fifth 
dam IlMiry Maid by Vermont Black Hawk S, etc. 

Price reasonable. For further particulars address 
WILD FLOWER STOCK FARM, 

Conejo, Frnann Co., Cnl. 



For Sale. 



One of the finest BREWSTER VICTORIAS; alao 
elegant Brewner Family Carriage; also one yery 
haudsnme Coupe. All In first class condition. 
Apply at 1011 Sutter St .. F. S 

GOOD YOUNG ROADSTERS FOR SALE. 

On account ot the scarcity of cars I find it impos- 
sible to take all the horses in my string at Oilroy to 
New York, and have a lew well broke, sound and 
handsome young roadsters for Bale here. For prices 
apply to or call on BDDD DOBLE, 

Oilroy, Cal. 



PLEASANTON 

Training Track Association. 



The following list of horBes trained and developed on the track 
together with records obtained, will speak forcibly as to the great 
advantages offered to the patrons of the track, no records over 2:1 
being included. 



This track, celebrated all 
over the State as much 
for its splendid condition, 
despite all the changes of 
weather, as for its superb 
climate, has passed into 
new hands. Two hundred 
splendid new box stalls 
have been erected and the 
most thorough system of 
water laid on, conveying 
water to all stalls. The 
track itself has been thor- 
oughly overhauled andput 
in to the best shape pos- 
sible. The association is 
now ready to receive 
horses. 



.SEARCHLIGHT, 2:03 1-4. 

ANACONDA, 3:03 1-4. Champion pacing gelding ol the world 

to date. 

DIRECTLY, 3:03 1-4. Two year old record champion, 2:07*4 
Three year old record champion, 2:07. 

ALIX, 3:03 3-4. Champion mare, champion race record of the 

world for three heats. 2:06^, 2:05J4, 2:05^. 

FLYING JIB, 2 :04. 1.59^ to pole 

AZOTE, 3:04 3-4. Champiou gelding of the world to date. 
DIRECTUM, 2:05 1-4. Champion stallion of the world to date. 
DIRECT, 2:05 1-2. Champion pacer of his time 
KLATAWAH, 2:05 1-2. Three year old. 
LENA N., 2:05 1-2. Champion pacing mare of 1898. 
CONE V, 2:07 3-4. 
DIONE, 3:09 1-4. 

DIABLO, 3:09 1-4. Asa four year old. 
CKICKET, 2:10. Record for paclug mare at that time. 
LITTLE ALBERT, 2:10. 

SAN PEDRO, 2:lo. Winner of three races and 86000 in one week. 
GOLD LEAF, 2:11. Champiou three year old of her time. 
VENUS II, 2:1 1 1-4. 
OWYHEE, 2:11 1-4. 

MONBARS, 3:1 1 1-4. As a three year old. 
CALYLE CARNE. 2:11 3-4. 

MARGARET S., 2:12. Winner of last Horseman's Great Ex- 
pectation Stakes, $10,000 in coin and a $200 cup. 

Address C. B. CHARLESW0RTH, Pleasanton, Alameda County, Cal 



RENTALS— $2 per month 

Special large boxesfor studs, 
etc., twenty-five feet long, S3 
per month 

Board, etc., for men, $16 per 
month 



TO 
OR 



BUY 
SELL 



A HORSE, 



Come to the office of the Breeder and 
Sportsman, register your wants and place an 
advertisement in the columns of the paper. 
By this means you can make a sale or a purchase sooner and with less expense than 
by any other method. 



Do You Want a Camera? 



Takes a Picture 



4 1 



The Gem Poco 




FOR THREE NEW SUBSCRIBERS TO THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE GEM POCO is a 4x5 earner*, constructed with a universal or fixed 
focus lens that will take a picture clear and sharp at the outer edge as well 
as at the center This was deemed an impossibility until last season, when 
the GEM POCO demonstrated that it could be done. And yet no others 
have succeeded in obtaining this much desired result. 

It is covered with fine Morocco grain leather, has leather handle, two tripod 
plates, and two large brilliant oblong view finders, made in proportion to the 
plate, which insures the correct position of the views. 



It is equipped with a newly discovered fixed focus GEM lens, constructed on 
an entirely new principle, giving a great depth of focus, cutting the plates 
clear and sharp to their full size, together with rotary diaphragm with three 
apertures, Rochester safety shutter arranged for time or instantaeous expos 
tires, and speed regulator. 

As all working parts are made flush with the camera box, there is no possi- 
bility of their becoming broken or getting out of order. 



Any one sending us three new yearly subscribers, accompanied by the cash ($9.00), will be sent a GEM POCO. 
If you intend to get up a club, send for sample copies, to be used in canvassing, or send us a list of names of people 
you intend to see, and sample copies will be sent to them from this office. BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

22-24 Geary Street - San Francisco, Cal. 



P. S.— The Net Price of This Camera is $5, and Will be Furnished for thai Amount in Cash. 



[January 20, 190 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Pabbott, Esq.) 

Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High -Class Harness 

AND 

Saddle Horses 



HAMBLETONIAN WILKES 



Sire of 

Phoebe Wilkes 2:C8% 

Tommy Mc 2:ll"i4 

New Era 2:13 

Sibyl 8 2:16=i, 

Salville 2:17K 

Rocker 2:11%, 

jjArlioe Wilkes 2:l''4i 

Aeroplane 2:16}^ 

Grand George „2:18 

J. F. Hanson 5:19'^ 

Brown Be?s 2:24% 

And 19 others better than 
2:30, and ( producing sons 
and 6 producing dangbters. 



BREED TO A 
GREAT SIRE OF 
RACE HORSES. 

HAMBLETONIAN WILKES, by George Wilkes 2 :22, dam 
Mag Lock, by American Star; second dam Lady Irwin (grandam of 



(No. 1679) 



Lumps 2:21), by Hambletonian 10; 
dallah Chief. 



third dam Daughter ot Roe's Ab- 



► SEASON OF 1900 $50. 

Usual return privilege: excellent pasturage and best ot care taken ot 
mares, 94 per month, at Green Meadow Farm, Address 

R. I. MOORHEAD, 
t Green Meadow Farm, Santa Clara, Cal 



DIRECT 2:05 1-2 



SIRE OF 



Directum Kelly, 2:08 1-4 

Directly - - - 2:031-4 

Miss Margaret - 2:11 1-2 
Ed B. Young - - 2:11 1-4 
I Direct - - - - 2:13 
Miss Beatrice - 2:13 1-4 

And 13 ither Standard Trotters and Pacers 
Terms, $100 the Season 

Is now in the stud at HEATING'S STABLES 
at Pleasanton, California track. 

Excellent pasturage and the best of care taken of 
mares in any manner that owners .may deBire at 
reasonable rates. Apply to 

THOMAS E. KEATING, Pleasanton, Cal. 




Racine! Racing! 



California Jockey Club. 

OAKLAND RACE TRACK. 
Jan. 22d to Feb. 3d, [incl. 

Racing MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, rain 
or shite, 

Five or More Paces Each Day. 

Races start at 2:15 P. m. sharp 

Ferry boats leave San "'ranclsco at 12 m. and 12:30, 
1, 1:30 2 2:30 and 3 p. m., connecting with trains 
stopping at the entrance to the track Buy your 
ferry tickets to fhell Mound. All trains via Oak- 
land mo e con nee with Han Pablo electric rare at 
8'venth aud Brnadwav. Oakland : also all trains via 
Alameda mole connect with San Pablo electric care 
at Fourteenth and Broadwiy, Oakland. These 
electric rare go direct lo the track In fifteen minutes. 

Returning trains leave the track at 4:15 and 4:45 
p. M and immediately after the last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS JK, Pres. 
K. B. MILROY, Sec'y. 



BAYSWATER WILKES 



Sire of KELLY BRIGQS 2:10 1=2. 

Will Make the Season of 1900 at Winters, Yolo Co., Cal. 

SABLE WILKES 2118, his sire, is the sire of 32 standard performers, including Oro Wilkes 
2:11, aud is by Guy A'ilacs 2:15^ (sire of Fred Kohl 2:07^, Hulda 2:03}i and 58 others in 2:30), by 
Geo. Wilkes 2:22, sire of 83 standard performers. 

FANNY BAYSWATER, his dam, is a thoroughbred mare by Bayswater and is the dam of 

Senator L. 2:23^», (four mile record 10:12). 

BESS'E SEDGWICK, his second dam, is a thoroughbred mare by Joe Daniels, and the dam of 

Bsssie Thorue 2:22% Third, fourth, tilth, sixth, seventh and eighth dams registered in Ameri- 
can Thoroughbred stud Book. 

Kelly Briggs as a four year old was one of the best winners on the California circuit last year, 

and is theonly one of Bayswater Wilkes' produce ever trained up to that time. 



TERMS FOR SEASON 



$40 



(With Usual Return Privileges) 



Good pasturage at $3 00 per mouth. All bills due at time of service, but must be paid when mare 
leaves the farm Mares coming from the north or from Sacramento can be Bhipped to Al. Grle ves, Davis- 
ville, and will receive prompt attention. Others should be shipped direct to Winters. 

S. H. HOY, Owner, 

Winters, Yolo Co., Cal 

Alameda Sale and Training Stables 

Stallions for Service, Season 



Breed to a Trie d Sire. 

McKINNEY 8818, Rec. 2:11 



1 



(By Alcyone, 

CHAMPION SIRE 




Alameda 

J. M. NELSON 



California. 

Proprietor. 



ALTAMONT 3600 

(By Almont 33. Dam, Sue Ford by 
Brown Chief) 

8IBE OP 

OHEHALIS 2:04 1-4 

DEL NORTE 2:08 

ELLA T 2:08 1-4 

DOC SPEKKY 2:09 

PATH MONT 2:09 1-4 

ALTAO 2:09 3-4 

"ALAMEDA 2:15 

DECEIVER 2:15 

TOUCHET r _ .2:15 

CARRIE S 2 :17 1-2 

and 31 others in the 2:30 list.* 



Terms for the Season 

With Usual Return Privileges. 



:$6o 



ARTHUR W. 2:11 1-2 

Sire WAYLAND W. 212 1-2 by Arthur 

Wilkes 3*28 1— -J. 
Dam LADY MOOR (dam of ' Arthur W 
2:11 1-2. John A. (3) 
2:14, Maud P. (3) 2:2 6',' 
trial 2 13 1-2), by 
Grand Moor: second 
dam by Finch's Glen- 
coe, son of imp. Glen- 
coe: third dam by 
Williamson's Belmont 
Arthur W. is the handsomest horse of his size in 
California, being a rich brown seal in color, stand- 
ing 16.2 and weighing 1200 lbs He has been a 
money winner every year of the three he has been 
campaigned and during the season of 1899 won two 
first moneys, two seconds, one third and one fourth, 
and reduced his record to 2:11V He will be cam- 
paigned ag-in in 1900 and will pace in 2:06 Bure. 
Consequently he will be limited to 10 approved 



McKINNEY 2:11 1-4. 
8ire of 

roney (4) 2:07% 

Jenny Mac. .2:09 

Zombro 2:11 

You Bet (3), 2:12J ^ 

Hazel Kinney 2:12 1 *i 

MrZeus 2:13 

Juliet D 2:\3 l /i 

Dr. Book (4) 2:13% 

Harvey Mac to) 2:1 4 >a 

Geo W. McKinney 2:U% 

Oslto 2:14% 

Mamie Riley 2:16 

Mabel McKinney 2:17 

McNally (« 2:20 

Miss Barnabee (3), 2:^1 

Sola 2:23 

Casco 2.-2IM 

Sir Credit (3) 2:25 

Eula Mc(2) 2:27>i, 



dam Rosa Sprague by Gov. Sprague) 

OF HIS AGE OF 2:15 PERFORMERS. 

A Race Horse Himself and a 

Sire of Race Horses. 
WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1900 

At Pleasanton Training Track. 

TERMS FOR THE SEASON $75. 

(With Usual Return Privileges). 

Good Pasturage for mares at $3 per month. 

For further particulars, address 

C. A. DURFEh, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 



DIABLO » 



mares. 

Terms for the Season 

With Usual Return Privileges. 



$40 



Good Pasturage at reasonable rates. Horses bought, sold and trained for road 
or track. Apply to or address 

J. M. NELSON. 

Cor. St. Charles St., and Eagle Avenue, 

Alameda, California. 



The Leading 
Pacific Coast Sire of New 
4 2:30 Performers of 1899. 

A SENSATIONAL PERFORMER ON THE TRACK AND 
A SENSATIONAL SIRE OF SPEED IN THE STUD 

At ten years of age he has to his credit Clipper 2:09 3 4, Daeda 
lion (4) 2:11, Diawood (4) 2:11, Hijodel Diablo (3) 2:1 1M, Inferno 
13)2:15, El Diablo 2:16'^, Goff Topsail 2:17M. N. L B. (2) 2:21K, 
Rey del Diablo (2) 2:23%. 

His colts are 



DIABLO is by Cbas. Derby a great sire, out of Bertha a great broodmare by Alcantara, 
showing greater speed each year and are noted for uniform beauty, size and style. 



FEE FOR SEASON OF 1900 



$50 



Pasturage for mares at 84 per month, 
or escapes. 



Good care taken but no responsibility assumed for accidents 
WM. MURRAY, Pleasanton, Cal. 



GAFF TOPSAIL 2A7}> 

Will Make the Season of 1900 at the Vallejo Race Track. 

TERMS $25 FOR THE SEASON 

Only son of Diablo standing for public service in 8olano Co. Gaff Topsail is one of the fastest horses 
in the -laic- is absolutely sound and has perfect legs and feet. 

Gsff Topsail is by Diablo, dam Belle by Alcona 730, son of Almont 33: second dam Stringbam by 
Jim Lick, son of Homer, he by Mambrino Patchen; third dam by Billy Cheatham, thoroughbred. 

Free Purse $250 for Gaff Topsail Three-Year-Olds. 

I will gi ;e a purse of (250 entrance fee for foals of 1901 sired by Gaff Topsail, mares covered in 1900 to 
be competed for in 1901 at the Vallejo Race Track. 

EDW. KAVANAQH, Box 366, Vallejo, Cal. 



January 20, 1900J 



47 



Palace Hotel 
Supper Room 

The moderate charges, de- 
lightful orchestral concerts 
and the undoubted luxury 
are the attributes that make 
the new Supper Room at the 
Palace Hotel the favorite 
place for after theatre parties. 
Open every evening (Sundays 
excepted) from 9:30 to 12 
o'clock. Entrance from main 
office and grand court, 

JOHN C. KIRKPATRICK, Manager. 



Books for Stallion Owners. 

1. Hoover' Stallion Service Kecords. 

The most complete book for recording stallion 
strvice ever placed before breeders. Not a picket 
edition. No more disputing sires. No more mixing 
of dams where this book is used. There is space for 
100 mares, giving their full breeding, desc iptimi 
date9 of service, dates of foa'ing, with a page for 
tabulating pedieree ol stallion In use, etc., etc.. «ith 
index complete, size lilx? 1 ^. Each book is hand- 
somely and substantially bound. Can be used for 
any kind ot pedigreed stock S2 00 

2. The Standard Stallion Service Book. 
The greatest Service Book published, containing 

space for entering 100 mares, giving space for full 
descripiion. pedigree, date of services and refusals 
date of foaling, etc., with in^ex complete, nesth 
bound in leatherene. suitable for pocket use. Can 
bs used for any kind of pedigreed stock $1 00 

3. Breeder's Note and Certificate Book. 
This book contains 75 blank certificates lo be 

given to owners of mares, certifying that said mare 
has been bred to a certain stallion. Also 75 notes 
suitable for owner of mare givir g to owner of stallion 
on account of stallion service fee. This book is well 
bound, and has stubs for both the notes and cer 
tificates. Can be used for any kind of pedigreed 
stock $1 00 

4. Stock Farm Record Book. 

FOR EVERY HORSE OWNER. 

It is all its name implies. Contains space for en- 
tering full description and of every animal on the 
farm, etc. 100 pages. Every farm should have 
one HI 00 

5. The Horseman's Handbook. 
Contents— Care and management of stallions; 

care and management of broodmares; care, break- 
ing and developing of colts; care handling and 
management of campaigners; care of the feet; shoe- 
ing and booting; care of horses in sickness; rules of 
the American trotting turf; betting rules; rules for 
laying out track, etc.. etc 81 00 

ALL, FIVE TO ONE ADDRESS FOR S5. 
Sent prepaid on receipt of price. Address: 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Sulkies Built to Order! 

REPAIRED and CONVERTED. 

Lined up to run perfect when strapped to 
horge. 

OUR SPECIALTY 

^SULKIES TO RENT^ 

We buy and bkll Second hand Sulkies. 
W J. KENNET, Blkeman, 

SRI Valencia St.. near 16th 



Mark Levy 

Fashionable Tailor 

For Quality, Style, Fit and Excellent work un 
surpassed. 

23 1-2 Geary St., San Francisco. 
Prices reasonable. Room 20. 



MSUFFERER& FROM 
ORPHINE 
. or aHy drug habit 

Cm b* permanently cored if then home* without pain, publicity ot 
trtention from buiineac The only KientiliC home treatment containing 
chc ACTIVE LIFE PRINCIPLE. The most difficult caaea lucccufull/ 
treated 1 : result* absolutely lure | perfect health •e-citibluhed. No opiates 
■ /! and ALL NATURAL POWERS FULLV RESTORED. Our free trial 
treatment atone cures hundreds of cases, and will be mailed, post-paid, to 
any person suffering from a druf habit. All communications ttHctly confi- 
dential. Address HOME TREATMENT CO.. 4 S West a 4 th St.. New York 
City, or J. C. McALPINE. at same address. Wul* fnuof*,* M t,<*t, mtjj 
1 5ampl« Just cone : It Is two weeks *ln« I have touched the drur ' 



•Ingle drop ot Uie mor- 
phine and have not »uf- 
fered one bit: In (act, 
every d«% hsvc fell bet- 
ter and «tter " 



i hardly know how 
write you. I feel to grate- 
ful, so thankful. I have 
take-i the nwdklne ex- 
actly aa prescribed, and 
ho* It has helped me." 



nan . -.i 
with the result, treat at 
nlfht splendidly and have 
no pain. Oh. what a <lod- 
send lo (hot* atflkted a* 
I have been." 



Breeders' Directory. 



HOI. 8 l'KI,\M— winners of every 7 days' butter con 
lest at Mate Fair 1899 lat * 2nd for aged cows, 4-yr 
3-yr, and 2 y> .-olds; '21 Jerseys and I>urrjams compp 
ling 5th year ruy Holstetus lavebtaten Jerseys for 
butier stock for sale: also pigs. F. H. Burke, 626 
Market St., s. F. 



VKKBA BUKNA Jhll*KY8-The best A. J. C.C 
registered prize herd is owned by HENRY PIERCE 
8»n Francisco. Animals for sale. 



JKKHhYg, HOI.8TKHV8 A,\n DUHHAM8. 

Dairy Su ck specially. H, gs, Poultry. Established 
1876. William Nil. <fc Co. , Los Angeles, Cal 



W. A. SHU'I'KK, Avon. Cal., Standard-bred Trot 
ting. Carriage and Koad Horses, Jacks, Mules and 
Durham Bulls for Sale. 



THOKOl'GHBIll- O K88hX H«l«J8-Best on the 
• 'oast. t»ro. Ht-meDt (Seminary Park), P. O. East 
Oakland, Cal. 



VETERINARY. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and Stable: 605 Golden Hate AveDue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



13 1*. w laa.. JP. Sffan 

M. R. 0. V. 8., F. E. V. M. 8. 

VETERINARY iVRflBOK, 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary B ur 
<eons, England ; Fellow of the Edlnburg Veterinary 
Medical Society; Graduate of the New Veterinary 
College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Surueon to the S. F. 
Fire Department: Live stock Inspector for New Zea- 
land and Australian Colonies at the port ot San 
Francisco; Professor of Equine Medicine, Veterinary 
Surgery, Veterinary Department University of 
California; Ex-President of the California State Vet- 
erinary Medical Association; Veterinary Infirmary, 
Residence and Office. San Francisco Veterinary Hos- 
pital ill" Golden Gate Avenue, near Webster 8t.. San 
^ranclBCo: Telephone West 128 




O'BKIJKN & SONS, Agents, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Capt. Tom Merry 

Compiler of 

TABULATED PEDIGREES 

(Thoroughbred Horses Only) 

Address 534 1-2 South Spring St. 

Log Angeles, Cal. 

Refers to Hon. Wm. C Whitney, New York : Hon. 
Perry Belmont, New Yoik; James R Keene Esq., 
New York: E. rt. Gardner. Jr.. Saudersville, Tenn. ; 
Wm. Hendrie Esq. , Hamilton. Out. 



"THE SEARCHLIGHT" 

Thos. B. Murphy 

Scientific Farrier. 

TROTTING, ROAD AND PLAIN SHOEING. 

... 23 Golden Gate Avenue . . . 

Branch shop— Keatlog'sTralnlngStablei, Pleas- 

anton, Cal. All work guaranteed. 
Telephone Folsoin 071. 



To Horse Owners. 



Millard F. "anders has located at Pleasanton, 
where he will conduct a first class traiuing stable 
Gentlemen having colts or horses they wish devel 
oped for sale or racing purposes can be accommo- 
dated. Correspmdence solicited. 



SMITHS 



CASH 



Once Used, Always Used. 



'Mi "ii i al telisbleand largest mall order house. 
Ask for Catalogue, free. 

25-27 Market St., near the Ferry. 




(Trade Mark Registered.) 

The greatest remedy in the world for all diseases 
of the foot of the horse. Best for road horses; be«t 
for carriaee horses; best for work horses. Cures bud 
ft ct. keeps good feet sound. Cheapest because it 
goes farthest and does all that is claimed of it 

It was used all the past summer by Tom Murphy, 
California's great track shoer on the Keating horses 
that won S28.000 on the Grand Circuit. If you see 
Murphy ask him about it. Or ask Dr. Boucher of 
Miss Logan fame; Monroe Salisbury, Chas. Durfee 
or Pete Williams. 

There are Scores of Letters Like] These: 

Plymouth Hackney Stud. 

CHILTON VILLI, Mas^., Nov. 20, '99. 
Harroi.d & Co : I beg to say that I consider 
Harold's Hoof Ointment the best I ever used. The 
champion Hackney gelding Tom Noddy had very 
buttle feet before using it and I took particular 
pains with him and gave it a fair trial wilb the 
most satisfactory results, for no horse could have 
better feet than he has now. 

Thos H. Wilson 

That's What They til Say. 

H ARNOLD'S HOOF OINTMENT not only 
cures all diseases of the horse's foot, 
but keeps good feet absolutely sound. 



PRICES— IV; lb box, SI; 3 lb. bucket, S3; 
5 1b. bucket, S3; 10 1b. bucket, S5, F. O. 
B. Chicago. 

Manufactured solely by 

HARROLD & CO., 

1013 Masonic Temple - Chicago, III. 



Sent 



Write for our book "The Foot of the Horse, 
free if this paper i9 mentioned. 
Thompson Bosler, Los Angeles, agent for Southern 
California. 



Galiforjia irtlweslen Ry. 

LESSEE OF 

San Francisco & North Pacific Ry. 
The Picturesque Route 

OP CALIFORNIA. 

1 Finest FlBblng and B anting: In California 

NUMEROUS RESORTS. 

MINERAL SPRINGS, HOT AND GOLD 

HEALTH 

PLEASURE 

RECREATION 

The Section tor Fruit Firms and Stock 
Brooding. 

THl BOUTS TO 

San Rafael Petaluma 

Santa Rosa, ukiaH 

And other bean tlfnl towns. 
THK BKHT CAMPING HROUND8 ON 
THE OOABT. 

Tiokbt Omen — Corner New Montgomery ai 
Market streets, under Palace Hotel. 
Ginibai. OrriOB— Mntnal Life Building. 

R. X. RVAR.Uen. Pa«a. *«• 

The largest and best located sales pavilion 
on the Pacific Coast I 



Occidental Horse Exchange 

721 HOWARD STRKKT, 
Near Third - - San Francisco. 



Having fitted up the abo^e place especially for 
the sale of harness horse", vehicles, harness, etc., ll 
will afford me pleasure to correspond wilb owncr> 
regarding the Auction Salna which I shall hoi'' 
at this place KVEKY TUBSDAY at 11 a. ra 
Arrangements can be mado for special sales of 
standard bred trotting stock, thoroughbreds, etc 
My turf library is the largest on this Coast, hence 
lam prepared to compile catalogues satisfactorily 
to my patrons. I take pleasure in referring to any 
and all for whom I have sold horses during the past 
two years. WM. G. I.ATNO, 

Live Stock Auctioneer. 

Telephone Main 5179. 



ELAKE, MUFF.TT & T0WNE 

DBALKRH IN 



55-67-59-61 First Street, 8. P. 

Telephone Malm 198. 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Seventeenth Annual Trials 

OE THE 

Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club 



TO UK RUN AT 



BAKERSFI ELD 

Commencing MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 1900. 



Members' Stake 

Annual Derby 
All-Aged StaKe 

Champion Stake 

Entries for A 11- Aged Stake close Friday, 
December 15, 1899. 

W. S. TEVLS, President, 

J. E. de RUYTER, Secretary, 



AT STUD 



CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(UlenbeiKh Jr. — Stella; 
SAM'S BOW 
(Plain sam— Dolly Dee II) 

STOCKD ALE KENNELS 

R. JVI. DODGK, Manager, 

"Itakerxtleld , Kern Co., Cal. 
Boarding. Pointer puppies and well broken dogs 
for sale. 

AT STUD 

Champion Guy Silk 

No. 39,168, by BEN DIGO— MAUD 8. II. 
Fee, 815.00. 
For particulars address 

PINE BILL COCKER KENNELS, 
San Anselmo, Marin Co., Cal. 



BOOK ON 



Dog Diseases 



AND 



IX o -\7sj- to Feed 

Mailed Free to any address by the author 
H. Clay Glover, D. V. 8., 1293 Broadway 
New York. 




Market 
Junction & J5*arnV 




Business College, 24 Post St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The most popular school on Ihe Coast. 
B. P. HEALD. President, O. 8. HALEY, Bec"y. 
X»-Ri-n<l for Circulars. 




Bursal Elargements, 
Stiff Joints, Arthritis, 
CURED 

WITH 

Absorbinejr. 

A pleasant Liniment to use, causing no 
inconvenience. $I.OO per bottle delivered. 

Describe your case fully. Special direc- 
tion, if needed, will be furnished free. 

Address 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

SPRING l I ELD, - • MASS. 

Gocoanut Oil Cake. 

THE BEST FEED FOR STOCK, 
CHICKENS AND PIOS. 

For sale In lota to suit by 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 
208 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



48 



[Januaht 20, 1900 



TELEPHONE'. 

South 640 



> we Harness 




E#* fir 



RANCI5C0, 



New Styles 



1900 



New Prices 



HARNESS 

HORSE CLOTHES 
HORSE BOOTS 
MEDICINES 

J. O'KANE 



26-28 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco. 



58 Warren Street, 
New York 



•E. C." and Schultze Powders 

Always Reliable - Never Pits Barrels 

SAFE! STRONG! CLEAN! QUICK! 

Otto Feudner broke 116 Blue Rocks straight with Schultze Powder at Lincoln 
Club Shoot, May 21, 1899. 

PHIL. B. BEKEART, Pacific Coast Representative 



Du Pont Smokeless Leads. 

The Winner of the Trophy in the 

GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP 1899, 

A.nd Four out of Six Shooters with Straight Scores used 

Du Pont Smokeless Powder 



Clabrough, Golcher & Go. 



REMINGTON | REMINGTON | REMINGTON REMINGTON ggj 



in balance 

1ammer$t1ammerlcss 
tin IwgIvg arades^A 



REMINGTON /\RM5© 

— ILION.NY- — 

>>^3/3 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 9 



REMINGTON | REMINGTON | REMINGTON | REMINGTON 



Remington Guns Sold by All Gun D.ealers. 



43- Catalogues on application. 



PACIFIC COAST DEPOT, 
425-437 Market St., San Francisco, 



H. E. SKINNER CO. 



Successor to 



FISHING TACKLE ££M«£« 



GUN GOODS 



Elegant and Complete New Stock of Fine Cutlery. 



416 MARKET ST. 

BELOW SANSOME, S. F. 

Holiday Specialities in All Lines. 



L.C. SMITH 



GUNS 

ARE 

WINNERS 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 



WSend for|Catalogne. 




FISHING 
Tackle 




538 :market street, s. f. 



KILL EVERY TIME! 



SELBY 



FACTORY LOADED 

SHOTGUN CARTRIDGES 



GUARANTEED never to shoot loose with any nitro"powder'made. 



Most of the Market Hunters and Crack Shooters use SMITH GUNS. They are Noted for their 
Strong Shooting, Perfect Balance and Qeneral Worth. 

L. 0. SMITH Guns are Manufactured and Guaranteed by 
THE HUNTER ARMS CO. FULTON N Y. 

PHIL. B. BEKEART, Pacific Coast Representative - San Francisco, Cal 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

AND 

CATALOGUES COMPILED 

OF 

STANDARD and THOROUGH BREO HORSES 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

22-24 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 




Vol. XXXVI. No. 4. 

No. 22% GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1900. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR. 



A ROYALLY BRED SIRE. 



Carries the Blood of the Two Greatest Trot- 
ting Bred Families and Has Achieved 
Individual Greatness. 



are producing sires, and twelve of hia daughters, nearly 
all young mares are the dams of race winners with fast 
records. 



o f Gay Wilkes . 



fGeo. Wilkes.. 
I 



"I believe the Wilkes-Nutwood cross is the greatest 
on earth," wrote one of the best posted horse breeders 
of America several years ago, and the official race 
records are yearly furnishing evidence to prove that his 
belief was established on a sound basis That George 
Wilkes 2:22 founded the greatest family of race winners 
is not to be disputed ; his blood is by the records the 
most prepotent in America in the sire line, and his sons 
and grandsons have inherited his wonderful qualities 
The mighty Nutwood, whose death occurred but a few 
short years ago, and the last of whose get are still colts 
and fillies, is but two behind 
the great champion Election- 
eer in the number of his 2:30 
performers, and before the 
close ot 1900 will have suc- 
ceeded to the proud title now 
held by the dead hero of Palo 
Alto. In addition to this 
Nutwood is the greatest sire 
of broodmares that have pro- 
duced race winning speed. 
His daughters have produced 
31 with records of 2:15 or 
better, which is a greater 
number of fast ones than the 
daughters of any other 
stallion have given to the 
world. Thus we see that the 
Wilkes and the Nutwood 
families lead the procession, 
the former in the sire line, 
the latter in the broodmare 
line and they have confirmed 
the statement that '"the 
Wilkes Nutwood cross is the 
greatest on earth." 

At the Nutwood Stock 
Farm, at Irvington, Alameda 
county, Mr. Martin Carter 
owns a stallion that is des- 
tined to be the greatest repre- 
sentative of this combination 
of champion blood This is 
Nutwood Wilkes, foaled in 
1888 raced to a record of 
2:1(5%, proving himself a 
game and wonderfully fast 
trotter, making but two full 
seasons in the stud since but 
being al eady the sire of two 
champion three year olds, 
John A. McKerron 2:12^ 
and Who Is It 2 :12, the latter 
reducing his record to 2:10% 
as a four year old and the 
former confidently expected 

by his owner, H K. Devereaux of Cleveland, to secure 
the world's wagon record this year. At 11 years of age 
Nutwood Wilkes was the aire of ten 2:30 performers 
though his produce did not numoer more than twenty- 
five all told, and the proportion of his produce now in 
training that show natural speed is as great, if not 
greater, than can be shown by any stallion in the world. 
As can be readily seen from the photoengraving on this 
page Nutwood Wilkes is a grand individual and he not 
only transmits his early and extreme speed and racing 
qualities to his produce, but he endows them all with 
good looks, good feet and legs and the constitution 
which he inherited from his sire and dam, a quality 
that enables them, both living, the one at 21 the other 
at 20 years of age, lo present the appearance of five 
year olds. 

Guv Wilkes 2:15J^, his sire, is one of the greatest of 
the great sons of Geo. Wilkes He has eighteen in the 
exclusive 2:15 list, headed by Fred Kohl 2:07%, and 
sixty, with records better than 2:30; twenty of his sons 



I. Lady Bunker . 



SHambletonian 10 
Dolly Spanker 
i Mambrino Patchen 
i Lady Duun by Am. Star 



t> ILida W. 2:18%.. < 

a i 



I Nutwood 2 
I 



:18% .. | 



(.Belle . 



Belmont 61 

Miss Russell by Pilot Jr. 

Geo. M. Patchen Jr. 

1 Rebel Daughter by 

Williamson's Belmont 




NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16 1-2. 



Lida W., the dam of Nutwood Wilkes, is a wonderful 
mare. She produced five colts before she was trained 
and the year the fifth was foaled she was given a short 
preparation, took a record of 2:18J£ and returned to the 
breeding farm. She had two minute speed and is now 
one of the grandest individuals in the broodmare ranks. 
Nutwood, her si e, has 13 in the 2:15 list headed by 
Manager 2 :06%, and 166 in the 2 :30 list ; 115 of his sons 
are producing stallions and 88 of his daughters are the 
dams of standard performers, one the dam of the great 
Arion 2:07%, the greatest colt trotter ever foaled 

The second dam of Nutwood Wilkes was a producer 
and was by Geo M Patchen 31 while his third dam was 
Rebel Daughter by the Mambrino Patchen of the 
Pacific Coast Williamson's Belmont, a thoroughbred 
horse whose blood has done so much to make the horses 
carrying it game, handsome and fast. 

The breeding of Nutwood Wilkes needs only to be 
glanced at by the intelligent horseman. It is made up 
of great race horses, great sires and great broodmares. 



But pedigree alone never made any horse gteat. He 
must show himself worthy of his illustrious ancestry on 
the track or in the stud, and Nutwood Wilkes has done 
both. In 1895 he was bred to but three mares and then 
campaigned. The produce reuniting from those three 
services were Who Is It 2:12 John A. McKerron 2:12% 
and Echora Wilkes 2 :18%, all records made in 1898 as 
three year olds The next year Who Is It reduced his 
mark to 2 :IQ% and was only beaten a head by Peter the 
Great in 2 :08 % This is a showing never equalled by 
any stallion in America. The blood of Nutwood Wilkes 
should be sought after by those who wish to keep in the 
front rank of the horse breeding business and to the 
owners of good mares we would say : Look over the 
pedigree and record of this great young horse and then 
go to Pleasanton and inspect the string of twelve 
youngsters by him there in training They comprise 
all of training age that are owned by Mr Carter and 
were not selected especially from a large number. 

They are living evidences of 
the prepotency of this great 
young stallion, and will con- 
vince anyone that as a pro- 
ducer of early and extreme 
speed, as well as size sound- 
ness and good looks Nutwood 
Wilkes is the peer of any 
horse in America. 

A few weeks ago Mr. Dan 
Mahaney, superintendent of 
the celebrated Ma pie wood 
Farm in New Hampshire, 
owned by Senator Jones, who 
purchased Nutwood Wilkes' 
son Who Is It for $6700, jour- 
neyed clear across the conti- 
nent to San Jose in this State 
to look at a yearling by this 
horse whose name he had 
seen in some of the Eastern 
stake entries. He found the 
colt iti a paddock unbroken 
and untried. But his experi- 
enced eye told him he was 
just what he wanted and he 
asked the price. $1000 was 
the figure named by the 
astonished owner and the 
trade was made as soon as a 
cheek could be written. Mr. 
Mahanev turned the colt over 
to Mr. B. O. Van Bokkelen 
who will take him Kast this 
spring. He will be two years 
old in March This incident 
shows what is thought <>f the 
produce of Nutwood Wilkes 
by an expert who has tried 
one of them. 

There is one important 
point that should be taken 
into consideration by breed- 
ers. The produce of Nutwood 

Wilkes all show speed early. 

~ As soon as they are broken 
they show« speed at the trot or pace and are ready to 
begin training Breeders who are looking for profit 
desire quick returns for their money and there is no 
stallion in America whose get come to their speed more 
naturally or earlier than do the colts and fillies by this 
horse. Nutwood Wilkes was himself a fast colt, and took 
a record of 2:20% as a three year old His blood lines 
are the most fashionable with the leading breeders of 
America and the owners of good mares should avail 
themselves of tlie opportunity to breed to this horse 
while they can. His service fee remains at the same 
figure as last year when for the first time in his life he 
was bred to a large number of very choice mares, many 
of them 'with fast records. Those who breed to him 
this year will reap profits in added values to their colts 
caused by the performances of last year's matings. It 
is an opportunity that should not be wasted 

Nutwood Wilkes will make the season of 1900 at the 
Nutwood Stock Farm, Irvington, Alameda county, Cal , 
at a fee of $50 with the usual return privileges. 



50 



.January 27, 1900 



PLEaSANTON PIOK-TJP9. 



A Mistaken Poltcy. 



News From the Horse Centre By Our Special 
Correspondent. 



An elegant life size portrait of Anaconda is now being 
made for D. F. Tillmann, which will ornament the dining 
room of his restaurant at the track. Those who have seen 
the portrait partly finished say it will be something grand 
and true to nature. 

There is always a jolly crowd of horsemen at the Rose 
Hotel during the evening bours and there have already been 
g o many races trotted around mine host Wundsch's stove 
that the II >or is getting slick. There have been some forty 
or fifty heats trotted in the local three-cornered stallion race 
so far — all dead heats. Several high class pedro players 
have been developed also since the season opened, and 
Millard Sanders has won the billard championship. 

The excellent weather during the past week started all the 
trainers working the horses slow miles and some promising 
looking colts are seen daily. 

About the middle of February nine fine young horses will 
be sent to the Faeig, Tipton sale in New York by Millard 
Sanders. Besides the green ones to be sent by Sanders, there 
will also be three belonging to Charlie Griffith: Jib Albert, 
trotting record of 2:17$, by Albert W. out of the dam of 
Flying Jib; a chestnut mare, Rachel Welch, no record, by 
William L. dam by Robert McGregor, second dam Nancy 
Lee, dam of Nancy Hanks 2:04, by Dictator. Tbis mare is 
in foal by Searchlight; and a three year old mare by Diablo 
out of Rachel Welch. 

The track was never in better condition for training than 
now. 

Dr. Dalziel of San Francisco, a veterinary dentist, paid 
Pleasanton a visit during the week and dressed a number of 
horses' mouths for Thomas Keating, Chas. Griffi.h and 
J. M. Ahiso. 

Some few months ago there was considerable talk about 
holding a harness meeting here this year. What has become 
of all the advocators of this scheme? 

Dick Benson of) Eans»s)City was in Pleasanton the greater 
part of the week and succeeded in purchasing the fast trotter 
Brice McNeil 2:I9J from Wm. Dahl of this place. 

I Direct 2:13, owned by Charles Eapp of San Francisco, 
arrived here Tuesday to go into the Keating stable. 

For the benefit of strangers who now visit the track for 
the inspection of the celebrated horses now stabled there, 
T. £. Keating has had an elegant sign board placed upon the 
end of his row of stalls which reads: "T. E. Keating's 
Training Stables,'' and over each stall is the name of the 
occupant with his record if any. 

There was a great demand for the Breeder and Sports- 
man here Saturday. 

Tommy Murphy, who has been with the Pleasanton 
horses for several years, can yet be found swineing his 
hammer and making the anvil ring at the track. So 
rushed is he with work that an extra man is constantly 
kept here during Mr. Murphy's absence attending to his 
shop in the city. 

Chas. Hartson of Nevada city was in town during the 
past week. He has a very promising colt by Nutwood 
Wilkes now in training in the Carter stable. 

Clipper 2:09$, by Diablo, who has been jogged barefoot for 
some time past, was shod Thursday and will be given work 
from now on. 

James Hastings of San Francisco has sent his sged trotting 
mare Corrine Neilson by son of Guy Wilkes to T. £. Keating 
to be worked. 

Mr. Carter has received from Ellsworth & Reel of the O. K. 
stables at San Jose the six year old pacer Andy by Nutwood 
Wilkes dam Nettie G. by Anteeo for training. This pacer 
was formerly sold by Mr. Carter to the above parties. Wm. 
CecM, trainer for Mr. Carter, received two fine new bikes 
Friday, which he says he will put in use in holding his own 
with the twelve Nutwood Wilkes colts he has now in charge 
at the track. 

Jt is given out that Judge Green of Oakland will shortly 
ship to Pleasanton several colts he has had in training at 
Alameda. 

All but two old sLack's of stall sheds have now been torn 
down at the race track preparatory to further improvements. 

Thos. Green of Dublin says he does not intend putting in 
any more time in raising fast horses and intends disposing of 
several fine colts he now has. 

Geo. Davis has, beside going into the horse business on a 
small scale, begun raising St. Bernard dogs as a side is«ae. 
He now has an eleven months old pup which stands about 
three feet high and weighs 210 pounds which he says he in- 
tends putting in training for trottir.g purposes. The pup is 
known as Monarch and a~ standing offer is made by Davis 
that he can out trot any dog of his age. 

Trainer Ed Laflerty and Wm. Murray, better known 
among the horsemen as "Diablo Bill" have distinguished 
themselves as "hash slingers." They exemplified their 
ability for the first time Saturday night by assisting the 
ladies in clearing the banquet tables after an elegant spread 
given by the Masons. They are now seriously thinking of 
hiring out to some first-class hotel during the summer 
season. Cobr. 



Directors of the Marysville District Agricultural Association wil 1 
meet to consider the proposition of a lair and races, and to organize 
for the occaslo . John C. W hite, oi.e of the directors, met with other 
gentlemen last Thuraday representing other districts and a racing 
circuit was agreed to and the dates fixed. At the same time Mr. 
White informed the gentlemen present tnat he did not have the nec- 
essary authority to definitely promise that the proposed race meeting 
would be held in this city in August, as sc eduled. There is a great 
deal of woik necessary to arrange for and boid a successful fair and 
race meeting. Besidei this there is a considerable amount of money 
to be raised by soliciting donations, a task that very few men desire 
to engage in The writer has had years of experience in these mat- 
ters and la familiar with the dark side, as well as the more favorable 
conditions A fair and races chii be held under the plans outlined, 
but at least 12000 must be contributed by the citizens of Marvsvllle to 
insure the success desired and payment of purses. This can be ac- 
complished only In one tray, judging by conversing with merchants, 
hotel proprietors and saloon owners. During that week these gentle- 
men desiie that games be permitted at the track and in town, under 
supervision of the citv Marshal. II consent Is given by the Mayor 
and the games are permitted, it is claimed tnat four or five hundred 
more people, at least, will viBit Marysville on that occasion and will 
remain in town before and alter tbe races each day. On the other 
hand they claim that if gambling be prohibited, as d jring the two 
last meetings, only a few owners of horses will attend, and tbe peo- 
ple who drive In from the country, returning home ihe same day. 
Therefore the contnbutioT>s in eight instances of every ten will de- 
pend upon "an open door policy."— Marysville Democrat. 

With due defierence to the author of the above (a gentle- 
man whom we are certain has the vary best interests of his 
community as well as those of the Marysville Agricultural 
Association at heart) we think his policy, or rather the policy 
of the ''merchants, hotel proprietors and saloon owners," 
which be endorses, is a mistaken one. Like the editor of 
the Democrat we too have had "years of experience in these 
matters," but that experience has led us to an entirely differ- 
ent conclusion from the one reached by him It is true that 
in the days when California was "wild and woolly" the 
gamblers were one of the features that atcompan : ed every 
district fair. They plied their games openly, and at the 
track wheels of fortune, roulette tables and dice games at* 
traded a portion of tbe crowd during tbe day, while the 
hotels and saloons were filled with crowds at night, and the 
whirl of tbe wheels and the rattle of the dice drew almost 
the entire male population of the town to witness the games, 
or perhaps risk a few dollars on them. But California I as 
advanced in the scale of civilization duriog the past decade, 
and tbe farmers, fruit growers, stock breeders and manu- 
facturers whose taxes pay the appropriations which make 
district fairs possible, are pretty generally unanimous in the 
opinion that they are held for a different purpose than mak- 
ing them the rendezvous for a crowd of tin-born gamblers 
and fakirs who prey upon the public The "four or five 
hundred more people" which it is claimed will visit Marys- 
ville during fair week if gambling games are permitted to 
run, will dwindle by actual count to about one hundred, and 
thty will be of a class thi»t the town will be better off with- 
out. Horse owners and breeders are not of tbis sort and 
should not he classed with them. We ask the readers of the 
Breeder and Sportsman to run over the list of names of 
gentlemen who have made entries in the Occident -Make 
which closeil with Secretary Shields of the State Agricultural 
Society January 1st. and which were published in our issue 
of January 13th. There will be found the names of such 
men as Hon. Jesse D, Carr of Salinas, Col. Park Henshaw 
of Cbico, the late D E Knight of Marysville, John F 
Boyd of San Francisco, W. H. Lumsden of Santa R> sa, J 
B. Iverson of Salinas, I. L. Borden of San Francisco, Tuttle 
Bros, of Rocklin, Ira and Henry Pierce of Ssnta 1 o-a 
Thos. Smith of Valleji, Alex. Brown of Walnut Grove 
Rudolph Jordan, and A. B. Spreckels of San Fracci'co 
Martin Carter of Irvington, H. W. Meek of Haywardi 
and thirty or forty more of tbe same standing in the 
community. Does anyone suppose for one moment that 
gentlemen of this calibre will consider a fair more suc- 
cessful because the town wherein it is held is "wide open" 
and gambling rampant for a week? In our bumble 
opinion one of the principal reasons why district fairs in 
California have not been more successful is the fact that as- 
sociations have permitted the gamblers to have too much 
latitude and plav too conspicuous a part in the performance. 
The man with a family of sons growing up knows that there 
is a vast amount of practical knowledge to be acquired by 
them at a well conducted fair where are displayed the pro- 
ducts of the farms, tbe fields and the factories, and he also 
knows that vice leses its "hideous mien" by being seen too 
often. There is enough of it in every day life without mak- 
ing the district fair a place to fliirnt it in the eyes of old and 
young without let or hinJrance. Bookmaking has also done 
a tremendous injury to harness racing in this State, and by 
continuing it and allowing all the towns wherein fairs are 
held to be run on "the open door policy" during tbe week, 
tbe death knell of the whole business will follow in the near 
future. The harness horse in America is not bred for 
gambling purposes. Tbe highest prices for them are paid 
by men who do not gamble. In the East the cities where 
successful fairs are given a e not "wide open" The same laws 
are enforced during fair week thai are enforced during the re- 
mainder of the year. Tbis is as it should be. The breeders 
and owners of horses are law abiding citizens, and expect lo 
obey the laws of any community which they may visit dur- 
ing the year, and they look with disfavor upon the gang of 
tin horn gamblers, touts, etc , who follow in the wake of fairs 
and all other large gatherings of people because these oc- 
casions offer them an opportunity to rob the unsophisticated 
and unwary. The way to make a district fair profitable is to 
cater to the people of the district — the farmers, tbe stock 
breeders, the fruit growers, the merchants and the manufactur- 
es. Gate receipts are better than subscriptions from those wh 



want "an open door policy." There is not a town the size 
of Marysville,. but can give an annual fair that will be success- 
ful in the way of exhibits, successful in the way of attendance 
and successful in the way of financial profit. All that is 
needed is energy, enterprise and proper management. The 
race meeting, which is one of the features of all fairs, should 
pay its own way. Nothing bat auction pools and mutuals 
should be allowed. Bookmaking should have no place at a 
district fair meeting. Get to work early, use good judgment 
in arranging a program, insist on high class honest contests, 
try to furnish the public the worth of their money, and 
make an honest and energetic endeavor to attract the best 
people in the community to your meeting and you will find 
that you ci>n bring it to a successful issue without the aid of 
'"donations" that are promised on the condition that a crowd 
of gamblers can come into the town and by violating the law 
thereof cause the fair meetings to be looked upon as an evil 
by the larger proportion of the substantial citizens of the 
community. 

The Stanford Stake of 1899. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman— An item in your 
issue of January 20, 1900, in re the claim of E. J. Weldon 
(owner of Elevator, biy filly by Iran Alto, a contestant in 
the Stanford Btake at a meeting of the 8tate Agricultural 
Society of California last September) attracted my attention 
because I represent Dr. Weldon in the matter, and am famil- 
iar with the facts of the case and the law of the National 
Trotting Association bearing on the issues at stake. 

It occurs to me that your large army of readers on the 
Pacific Coast may be interested in the questions at stake in 
this case, and I therefore take the liberty of setting forth the 
facts and my conclusions. 

In the item referred to in your issue of January 20th last 
passed, you state the fact that "the rules say that in any 
heat which a protested horse shall win distance shall be 
waived" and the item further states that ''it is held by the 
Association that the distance fhg was used, however, and 
distanced horses noted on the book, etc." 

The judges or association had no right or power under the 
rules to declare any horse or horses distanced in any heat 
won by a protested horse and that they did not so declare or 
'note on the book" the distanced horses, is fully established 
and apparent by said ''bnok" which contains the following 
summary : 

Dr. Frasse's Slater Ill 

Direct Heir '" *"."".' 2 2 2 

Elevator 949 

Le Hoy Z^IZZZZZTI 4 4 4 

TlaJuana 5 6 6 

This summary is entered in ink. Under the space left for 
' remarks" in the book is the following statement: "Owing 
to protests having been filed against- Direct Heir and Dr. 
Frasse's Sister the horses which finished outside the distance 
fhg in the first heat were allowed to start in the second 
heat." 

The summary 3hows that they were not only allowed to 
start in the second beat but in the third heat also and as be- 
fore shown, given positions in each heat and said positions 
were duly recorded in said book. 

No rule or precedent of the National Trotting Association 
confers any power on tbe judges or the members to allow a 
horse to start again if announced distanced, and any such 
action on the part of the judges or member will not avail to 
deprive a horse competing of a lawful and recorded position 
in a heat. 8uch action would be ex-post facto and of no avail. 

Please note that in the above quoted words under "remarks" 
no boree is designated as having been distanced in the first or 
any heat. While it is insisted that Elevator was well inside 
the distance the first and subsequent heats (and that insist- 
ence will be supported bv affidavits of men of high business 
standing and knowledge of trotting races), the question will 
not hinge upon that fact alone, or does that in any way de- 
termine the issue. 

Mr, Wilson and Mr. Cobb (two of the judges) state 
they do not remember whether or not distance wits declared 
after the first heat. It is understood that Mr. Spreckels (the 
third judge) states that distance was announced. 

But if it was announced it was so announced without 
shadow of justification under the rule, and such announce- 
ment was an error. 

The Directors of the State Agricultural Society are known 
to be men of honor, fair-minded and just, and whatever con- 
clusion they reach as to Dr. Weldon's claim for second 
money in the Stanford Stake (Direct Heir having been de- 
clared ineligible by the Board of Review of the National 
Trotting Association) such conclusion will be tbeir best and 
fairest thought and judgment in the matter. And there is 
not the slightest doubt but that the judges of the race will, 
if convinced of an oversight, rectify such oversight and do 
full and complete justice in the case. 

Respectfully, 

Charles A. Willis. 



There will be four races for three vear old trotters at the 
next Kentucky Breeders meeting, viz • The Kentucky 
Futurity, (20 000; the I ouiaville Priz». $10 000; tbe Stork 
Farm Purse, $6000, and the Kentucky $2000, in all $38 000. 
The races will be so arranged on the card that thev will not 
interfere with each other. There are plenty of other rich 
plums for three vear olds, and it is not to be wondered at 
that parties owning promising youngsters are asking long 
prices. 



January 27, 1900] 



51 



Herod Blood In America and France. 



fBy W. H. Ronx] 

The more one studies tbe question of tail male succession 
the more be is impressed with tbe extreme partiality which 
the English have manifested for Eclipse. As we all know, 
only three stallions live to day in tail male, namely, Eclipse' 
Herod and Matchem. As I recently wrote in these columns, 
the line of Eclipse not only maintains its supremacy in Eng- 
land, but is actually drawing away somewhat from the other 
two, and we find the Eclipse line to have won £434,605 in 
1899, as against Herod's £22,327 and Matchem' e £16,377. 
Id the matter of individual winners, Eclipse is equally 
dominant, having 864 winners of 1464 races, while Herod 
shows 61 winners of 100 races, Matchem, as usual, being 
third with 42 winners of 74 races. It is Eclipse nil along 
the line. The twelve leading stalliocs, winning between 
them no less than £173,597, embrace not a siDgle horse of 
either Herod or Matchem descent. 

It is to America and France that we have to turn to find 
the Herod male line at all strongly asserting itself. The 
larger proportion of successful stallions in America trace to 
Eclipse, as we recently found by reckoning the totals of the 
thirty-six stallions whose get won $20,000 or more in i -PS, 
the Eclipse total being $1 078,366 won by twenty-eight stal- 
lions, as against Herod's (250,629 won by five and Matchem 's 
(83,585 won by three. Toe figures will be noticed as 
singularly indicative of a greater Herod strength than obtains 
in England. But it is not only in these totals that Herod 
improves on his English showing. In the matter of sctuil 
supremacy we find a Herod horse, Hanover, at the top of 
the list, and not only is this true of 1898, but also oi the 
three preceding seasons, and, I believe, of 13J9 as well. 

As a matter of fact, Herod has fought a genuinely good 
fight in tbe question of individual leadership in the Amer. 
can stallion list. Turning back to 1870, we find that Lex- 
ington led in 1870-71-72-73-74, again in 1876, and again in 
1878. This, however, ended the supremacy of the Herod 
line through Diomed. It was not until 1885 that Herod 
again led, and then it was through the line of imp. Qlencoe, 
represented by Virgil. For the following eight years Eclipse 
led, but in 1894 Hero i came again, tbis time with Sir 
Modred, the Australian bred son of Traducer. This is in a 
way tbe same blood as Virgil, for we find that Traducer was 
by The Libel, he by Pantaloon, he by Castrel, son of Buzz- 
ard, while Virgil was by Vandal, he by Glencoe, he by Sul- 
tan, he by Selim, son of Buzzard. Indeed, Selim and Cas- 
trel were full brothers. Buzzard was by Woodpecker, a son 
of Herod, and it is interesting to note that Diomed, to whom 
Lexington traces in tail male, was removed from the great 
fountain head at precisely the same distance, having been by 
Florizel, he a son of Herod. 

Tbe Australian line of Herod having so nicely set the 
American line an example, the latter lost no time in emula- 
tion, for in the succeeding year (1895) Hanover, a son of 
Virgil, assumed the lead and has ever since retained it. 
Thus the history of the past shows that in the last thirty 
years the leading American stallion has traced fourteen times 
to Herod as against sixteen to Eclipse. Matchem has not 
once led. The various individuals who have scored these 
respective Herod and Eclipse figures are as follows: Herod 
— Lexington, seven seasons; Hanover, five seasons, and 
Virgil and Sir Modred, each one season. Eclipse — Leam- 
ington, four seasons; Glenelg, four seasons; Bonnie Scotland, 
two seasons, and Billet, Ravon d'Or, St. Blaise, Longfellow | 
Iroquois and Himyar each one season. I am sure that the 
Herod showing quite justifies the popular notion that this 
country is the hotbed of Herodism. 

Laying aside tbe question of preponderance of individuals 
and figures throughout, which is in both cases favorable to 
Eclipse, it is not surprising that these lines of Herod should 
be at their best here. Diomed, Buzzard and Olencce all 
spent their last days here. Indeed Diomed and Glencoe laid 
here the foundation of the respective male lines which have 
borne the brunt of the battle for Herod, for both Lexington 
and Virgil trace in unbroken successions of American bred 
parents to Diome-i and Glencoe respectively, and 1 am sure 
it is unnecessary for me to add that Hanover was by Virgil's 
son Hindoo, all three American bred animals. 

To be sure, old Buzzard laid the original foundation of 
this line in England before his exportation, as also that from 
which Sir Modred romps, for this latter horse's sire, Tra- 
ducer, was himself foaled in England. But I think we may 
regard both the Lexington and Hanover lines as distinctly 
native. 

I wrote at the outset that five Herod horses finished in the 
division of thirty-six, whose get won (20 000 or more in 
1898. These five, with their relative positions on the list 
and totals are ae follows: Hanover first, with (120,094; Hin- 
doo seventh, with (47,244: Sir Modred ninth, with (42,252; 
Emperor of Norfolk thirty-third, with (20,830; and Tremont 
thirty-sixth, with (20,209,* Here we find the usual Herod 
factors to the fore. Hanover, Hindoo and Tremont repre- 
sent the line of Virgil, who himself led the list in 1885; Em- 
peror of Norfolk is a son of Norfolk, he in turn by grand old 
Lexington, who led for so many seasons in the '70s, and Sir 
Modred as we have seen, was first in 1894. As in the general 
run of latter day results, tbe Glencoe line leads the other 
Herods. With this in view I was very much interested at 
the.table of winning two year olds of 1899, recently pub- 



lished in The Morning Telegraph, and I take the liberty of 
requoting the records of these defenders of Herod, as sires of 
two year old winners during the past season: Hanover, thir- 
teen winners of eighteen races; Hindoo, eight winners of ten 
races; Sir Modred, three winners of seven races; Tremont, 
two winners of ten races, and Emperor of Norfolk, one winner 
of three races. 

HEROD BLOOD IN FRANCE. 

The French have much of our characteristics as regards 
Herod. The bulk of results, as to the number of races won 
and amounts of money won, favors Eclipse, but the Herod 
horses made a vastly stouter contest than in England. The 
parallel between France and America is especially striking 
with rega. d to the percentages of winners which tbe three 
great lines furnish in the star events. A percentage sum- 
mary, recently published by Mr. Allisc-D, of the winners of 
the five great three year old classics — tbe Grand Prix, the 
Prix du Jockey Club, Prix de Diane, Prix Royal Oak and 
Prix Gladiateur— from 1878 to 1897, with the following 
results in tail male: 

Eclipse 58 per cent. 

Herod 38 per cent. 

Matchem _ 4 per cent. 

As will be remembered, I recently gave in these columns 
the tail male records of the history of twenty one of our 
American greatest races. 1 have worked out the percentages, 
whicb come out as follows: 

Eclipse _ 63.59 per cent. 

Herod 28.28 per cent. 

MaUhem 8 11 percent. 

These figures do not, of course, tally to the very unit, and 
may in a measure disappoint many who noted my introduc- 
tion of them. But it is really very striking that tbe general 
tendency of both American and French racing is towards a 
vastly stronger contest on tbe part of Herod, with a notably 
weak showing oF Matchem. 

PAST RESULTS IN ENGLAND. 

Englard's turf history is virtually an unbroken demonstra- 
tion of the superiority of tbe Eclipse male line as such. Mr. 
H. Couste's book shows the tail male records of the five 
English classics — the Two Thousand, One Thousand, Derby, 
Oaks and St. Leger — in twenty year periods, from 1778 to 
1897. For the first period, 1778-1797, Herod held a slight 
lead, bis figure being .4821, as against Eclipse's .3928 and 



Matcbem's .1250. However all tbis may be, the male line 
of Eclipse was not long in asserting its supremacy, and the 
following summary of the percentages for the remaining 
periods is nothing short of eloquent^ 

Period. Eclipse. Herod. Matchem. 

1798-1817 45.69 38.88 15.27 

18U-1837 46 42 1 2 

1838-1857 64 21 15 

I8i8-1877 7228 23.76 3.96 

1878-1897 88.11 5.94 5.94 



The extraordinary collapse of Herod in the last period is 
mainly due to the simple stampede in England for Whale- 
bone and Blacklock. 

As regards Herod, he is actually dominant in Germany and 
Austria, as shown by Mr. Couste's table of (he German and 
Austrian Derby results from 1878 to 1897: 

Herod 54.22 per cent. 

Eclipse 46 39 per cent. 

Matchem 2.43 per cent. 

All this more fully than ever shows tbat there is genuine 
merit in Herod, and the contemplation of Eclipse's tremend- 
ous advantage in England is to no small degree ofiset by the 
results elsewhere. In individual cases of otherwise equal 
conditions, Herod can never outdo Eclipse. 

"No one can pretend to deny that the Eclipse line fur- 
nishes a very great mBj Drity of the best sires the world over," 
was what I wrote, or meant to write about this matter in my 
last article, and the omission in type of the words "to deny" 
made my subsequent observations somewhat equivocal. It is 
evident that Eclipse is in tail male more thoroughly univer- 
sal, so to speak, Surely both America and France may find 
in the past and present no little encouragement to maintain 
and foster their very best — but only their very best — male 
lines* of the blood. And even old England may see tbe day 
when she will think it advisable to turn to France for a re- 
presentative of the Flying Dutchman or Gladiator, as well 
as to America for the line of imp. Glencoe.— N. Y. 
Telegraph. 

James Butler Sells Horaes to Russians. 

New York, Jan. 24. — The steamer Lahn of the North 
German-Lloyd line, which left this port for Bremen, carried 
away eleven trotting horses which James Butler of this city 
has just sold toConstantin & FraDZ Blenkleof St. Petersburg, 
Russia, for the reported price of (35,000. The Russian 
horsemen arrived here last Saturday, in search of promising 
young trotters for racing and breeding purposes. They were 
here only three days, most of which time was spent at 
Butler's East View Farm in Westchester county, where 
they found what tbey wanted. In point of breeding it would 
be hard to find a lot of higher class trotters than the ones 
the Russian horsemen carried < fl to the land of the Czar. 
The collection included one stallion and ten mares. Lud- 
wig, the stallion, is a half brother to Mr. Butler's noted 
horse, Directum Kelly 2:081, winner of the (10,000 Mer- 
chants and Manufacturers' Stakes at Detroit in 1898. Di- 
rectum Kelly was the largest winner in tbe grand circuit o 



that year, and was unbeaten during tbe campaign. Lndwig 
is two years old. 

Miss Fanny, one of the mares bought by the Russians, is a 
bay four year old by Direct 2:05* out of Fanny K. by Red- 
wood 2:27; bred by Milo Knox, Haywards, Cal. 

Another high-bred filly in the collection is Miss Ronner, 
four years old, by Director 2:17, out of the old lime grand 
circuit winner, Mambriuo Maid 2:15}, Tbis filly was bred 
by A. H. Moore of Philadelphia, who paid about (50,000 for 
her sire and dam. Still another royally-bred one is an un- 
named two years old chestnut filly by Delmarch 2:11}, out 
of the old-time trotting mare Suisun 2:18}. The remaining 
mares are : 

Katymere, a bay filly, foaled i i 1897. by Colonmore out of 
Baron Wilkes, dam Miss Kate 2:151. 

Delia Patchen, black filly, foaled 1896, by Wilkes Boy 
2:24';, out of Gabrielle Wilkes, bred by T. C. Anglin, Lex- 
ington, Ky. 

Annunciata, bay filly, foaled 1896, by Wilkes Boy 2:24}, 
out of Lady Clay, bred by T. C. ADglin, Lexington, Ky. 

Bessie Kenney, chestnut filly, foaled 1895, by Simmons 
2:28, dam Milady, bred by 8. A. Parker, Newell, la. 

Maggie Jay, bay filly, foaled 1897, by Jay Bird, dam 
Mag's Luck, bred by William L. Simmons, Lexington, Ky. 

Miss Sophistry, black mare, foaled 1895, by Direct 2:05}, 
dam Monora by Fallie, bred by Monroe Salisbury, Pleas- 
anton, Cal. 

Kate 8tranger, bay filly, foaled 1898, by Strangest, dam 
Kate Young. 

Changes Suggested In the N. T. A. Rules. 

At the regular biennial conference of members of tbe 
National Trotting Association to be held at (he Murray Hill 
Hotel in New York, Wednesday, February 14th , the follow- 
ing amendments to tbe rules will be submitted: 

Rule 2, Sec. 6, amended by inserting afler tbe wi rd "asso- 
ciation" in the sixth line, "whose decision shall be final." 

Rule 3, Sec 2, amended by inserting after the word "start" 
in the sixth line, "except when credit is extended by agree- 
ment." 

Rule 6, Sec. 3, amended by inserting after the word "be" 
in the tenth line, "fine, suspended, or." 

Rule 7, Sec. 1, amended by inserting after the word "be" 
in the sixth line, "fined, not to exceed (100, suspended, or." 

Rule 9, Sec. 1, amended by striking out all after the word 
"heats" in the sixth line. 

Rule 16 amended by striking out Sec. 1. 

Rule 21, Sec 1, amended by inserting after the word 
"rules" in the ninth line, "Where less weight is carried 
than required by Role 20, Sec. 1, time made is a bar." 

Rule 24, Sec. 1, amended by striking out the words "at 
least two and not more than" in the fourteenth line, and the 
word "competent" in the fifteenth line. 

Rule 27, Sec. 6, amended by inserting afler the word "ex- 
pelled" in the sixteenth line, "A horse penalized under this 
rule shall not be entitled to any portion of the premium " 

Rule 30, Sec. 1, amended by inserting after the word 
"horses" in the eighth line, "not so offending, distanced or 
ruled out." 

Rule 37, Sec. 1, changed to read as follows: "In all heat 
races on mile tracks, 80 yards shall be a distance: when eight 
or more start in a heat 100 yards shall be a distance. In all 
heat races on half-mile tracks 100 yards shall be a distance; 
when eight or more start in a heat 150 varris shall be a dis- 
tance." Rule 37, further amended by adding a new section 
as follows: 

Sec. 2 — A distanced horse is out of a race, and not entitled 
to any portion of the premium. 

Rule 43, Sec. 12. amended by striking out the words 
"purse or stake" in fifth line. 

Rule 51, 8ec. 7, changed to read as follows: 

"The National Trotting Association shall not collect sus- 
pensions for members tbat default in the payment of their 
pur.-es or stakes, and the president, secretary and other offi- 
cers of such association, upon conviction thereof by the 
Board of Review, shall be fined, suspended or expelled, and 
the President of the National TrottiDg Association is author- 
ized to act pending tbe action of the Board of Review. In 
such cases the suspension of such derelect associations shall 
be collected by ihe National Trotting Association, and ap- 
plied pro rata to tbe payment of tbe said unpaid purses and 
stakes, provided a duly .verified claim for such unpaid pre- 
miums is filed with the secretary of the National Trolling 
Association within thirty (30) days of the close of the meet- 
ing. No suspended member or members which have failed 
to pay premiums shall have authority to concel a suspension 
without the consent of the president of the National Trotting 
Association or Board of Review. Tbe Board of Review 
shall also suspend officers of the associations which fail to 
pay their dues." 

Rule 51 further amended by adding a new section : 

Sec. 8— All persons and horses under expulsion for fraud 
by reputable trotting and running associations in tbis or 
foreign countries conducting races under established rules, 
and such persons and horses as shall hereafter be so expelled, 
shall during such time stand expelled from the National 
TrottiDg Association, and shall not be allowed to compete on 
the courses of the members of this association. Tbe Board 
of Appeals of the National Trolling Associatiod reserves the 
power (in case tbe said board is not in session when the 
president is temporarily vested with such power) for good 
cause shown to reverse or modify any such expulsion in so 
far as it affects this association. 

Rule 52, Sec. 1, amended to read as follows: "Appeals 
may be taken to the member in case of suspension imposed 
by order of its judges, or of an officer acting for a member, 
but members shall not remove or modify any fine imposed 
by tbe judges of a race, or review any order of expulsion." 

Role 62, Sects. 1, 1, 3, struck out, and the following sub- 
stituted as Rule 62, Sec. 1: "The secretary of .the National 
Trotting Association shall furnish the secretary of the Amer- 
ican Trotting Register Association a certified copy of the 
summaries of all races and performances against time, and 
of all races occurring on the tracks of members as soon as 
possible after the receipt by him of said summaries at tbe 
cost of copying same. 



52 



[January 27, 1900 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F W. KELLEY, Pbopeietob. 

■m- 

The Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 



— OFFIC* — 

22 1-2 GEARY STREET, San Francisco. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 

C. E. Goodrich, Special Representative, 34 Park Row, New York. 

Terms— One Year »3, Six Months »1.75, Three Months SI. 

bTRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. vV. Kelley. 22% Geary St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer s name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee of 
good faith. 



San Franoisoo, Saturday, January 27, 1900. 



Dates Claimed. 

COLTJFA July 23d to 28th. 

WILLOW8 July 30tb to Aug. 4tb. 

RED BLUFF Aug 6th to 11th. 

CHICO Aug 18lb to 18th. 

MARY3VII.LB Aug 20th to 25th. 

WOODLAND Aug. 27th to Sept. 1st. 

STATE FAIR, Sacramento Sept. 2d to Sept 15th. 



Stallioua Advertised. 

TROTTERS AND PACERS. 

ALT AMON T 3600 J. M. Nelson, Alameda. Cal. 

ARTHUR W 2:11^ J. M Nelson, Alameda. Cal. 

BAYSWAPER WILKES S. H. Hoy. Winters, Cal 

BOODLE 2:12% C. F. Bunch, Sen Jose. 

DIABLO 2:09^ Wm. Murray, Pleasantoa, Cal 

DIRECT 2:05% Thomas E. Keating, Pleasanton. Cal. 

FALROSE 2:19 W. Masten, Woodland. 

GAFF TOPSAIL 2:17"*, Edw. Kavanagh, Vallejo, Cal. 

HAMBLETONIAN WILKES 1679. ..R. I. Moorhead. Santa Clara, Cal. 

McKINNEY 2:11% C. A. Durfee, Pleasanton, Cal 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16S> Martin Carter, Irvington. 

THOROUGHBREDS. 

TARCOOLA ) 

PRIMROSE > Ruinart Stock Farm, 

RUINART ) Beltane, Cal. 

HACKNEYS. 

GREEN'S RUFUS Bay wood Stud, San Mateo. 

THE ACTION of the Directors of the six agricul- 
tural districts comprising the counties of Colusa, Butte, 
Glenn, Tehama, Sutter, Yuba and Yolo, by which a cir- 
cuit of fairs has been organized and six weeks racing for 
good purposes is made certain, has done more for local 
trotting horse interests than anything which has oc- 
curred recently Every horse owner that has visited 
this office since the announcement was made in this 
journal last Saturday, has spokeD approvingly of the 
plan for a Northern California circuit, and expressed 
his intention of making entries for each meeting. It is 
to be earnestly hoped that the boards of directors of 
these associations will make a strenuous effort to hold 
agricultural fairs that will be worthy of the districts, and 
fulfill in every way the promises that were held out 
when the fight was made to have the appropriations re- 
stored. A big entry list to the races can be secured by 
offering an attractive program suitable to the horses now 
in California, and if such a program is advertised early 
there need be no fear of the results. The stock exhibit 
is one of the features of the fairs that should receive 
particular attention this year. In the counties in ques- 
tion dairying is rapidly becoming one of the leading in- 
dustries, and the production of beef cattle is also receiv- 
ing much attention. The ftct is being demonstrated 
that high class pork and mutton can be produced in the 
the Sacramento valley at a profit, while the draft and 
carriage breeds of horses are in demand more and mare 
every year. The "Northern California Circuit of Dis- 
trict Fairs" can by united action and energetic work 
have this year as fine a display of dairy and beef cattle, 
hogs, sheep and all the breeds of horses as has ever been 
made at county fairs in America. A high class stock 
exhibit and a good program of races, if properly adver- 
tised throughout the county, will draw crowds to the 
fairs and make the gate receipts large enough to insure 
the associations against any deficit. Nine-tenths of the 
people that pass through the gates at a county fair 
should be and necessarily have to be residents of the 
county. The way to get them interested enough to at- 
tend is to boom the fair through the columns of the 
county papers. It ie a mistake for a board of directors 
to hold, as many do, that the local people onght 
to attend anyway and therefore it is of no use to 
advertise at home. The greatest show on earth 



would not draw a corporals guard without advertising. 
Paderewski would play to empty benches instead of filling 
an opera house at $5 por head if his press agent was 
not at work weeks in advance booming him through 
the newspapers and working the people up to expecting 
the great treat which the great pianist always furnishes. 
The columns of the county papers should be filled for 
weeks in advance of the fair with flaming advertise- 
ments. There should be articles on the various breeds 
of stock that are to be exhibited. All the features of 
the fair should be exploited and the people worked up 
to "attendance pitch," if possible. The county paper 
must not be expected to do all this for nothing. The 
laborer is worthy of his hire and boards of directors will 
find that the money spent in booming thsir meeting in 
the home papers is the very best investment they can 
make. With a live secretary, an energetic executive 
committee and the county papers all "pulling" for the 
meeting it will be found that the people will rise to the 
occasion and turn out in numbers large enough to make 
the fair a success financially. 



IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH, and the 
action of the National and American Trotting Associa- 
tions in coming to an agreement of mutual recognition 
can do great good to the harness horse interests in this 
country. That there must be a parent association, one 
that will have the power and authority to make laws for 
the government of racing and to enforce them, is evident 
to every intelligent person, and that there should be no 
conflict between the two parent associations of this 
country is also evident. Now that the conference com- 
mittee has agreed on a plan of action by which each will 
aid and uphold the other and both work harmoniously 
for the good of the entire harness horse industry, horse- 
men may expect improvement and progress all along the 
line of conducting trotting meetings. Nearly all the 
associations of the Pacific Coast are or have been affili- 
ated with the National Association and under the agree- 
ment each association will retain its membership in tbe 
body to which it has belonged. At the Congress of the 
N. T. A. to be held in New York on the 14th of next 
month, many questions of great interest to these associa- 
tions will come up. Each should be represented at the 
Congress and if not directly then by proxy. No mem- 
ber should allow its vote to be sacrificed by having no 
representative at the Congress. 



AT BAYWOOD STUD, San Mateo, the imported 
Hackney stallion Green's Rufus will make the season of 
1900 to a few approved mares. Breeders who desire to 
raise horses for carriage and park purposes should pat- 
ronize this grandly bred, high acting stallion, and there 
is an almost certainty of good results if a trotting bred 
mare of the proper conformation and style is selected 
for mating with him. The carriage horse is in contin- 
ual demand and during the past few panicky years 
when other horses went at low prices the well manntred 
high acting carriage or park animal continued in good 
demand at high prices. Mr. John Parrott, proprietor 
of the Baywood Stud, has sold within the past few 
months two pairs of horses bred at his farm for { 2500 
each, and has had more demands tor horses than he can 
supply. This year there will be over thirty foals at 
Baywood Stud. There are now being trained at the 
farm a number of very handsome and promising three 
year olds by Green's Rufus, and the uniformity with 
which they are showing high action and style is cer- 
tainly convincing evidence of his prepotency as a sire. 
Horse owners who are interested in the breeding and 
education of the perfect carriage horse should pay a 
visit to this establishment as there is much to see and 
learn there. 

A BREEDER'S SUCCESS in turning out speed- 
extreme racing speed — depends more on his ability in 
selecting broodmares than on anything else. Yet even 
the right kind of a broodmare will not prove a uniform 
speed producer unless she is properly mated. In select- 
ing broodmares too much attention cannot be given to 
individuality as regards "traits of character" and nerve 
force. A negative, passive, indifferent kind of a mare 
seldom, if ever, proves to oe a successful speed producer 
while stallions of this latter temperament often prove 
quite successful as speed sites, especially if they should 
happen to be used on nervy, snappy, high strung and 
high bred mares. We would rather take chances on a 
so-called "rattle-headed" mare, especially if she is well- 
bred and possesses a high rate of "uncontrollable" speed 
than most any other kind. . This class of mares are not 
really "rattle-headed," but they are so highly organized 



that they are usually spoiled in endeavors to work them 
by persons who undertake to manage them the same as 
they do the more indifferent kinds. They would be all 
right if worked and managed in a manner compatible 
with their high nervous temperament. A brood mare 
to prove successful as a speed producer, must of necessity 
be possessed of a high degree of positive nerve force, a 
hardy constitution and a density of nerve, bone and 
muscular tissue. So-called "rattle-beadedness" is about 
the best evidence that a mare is really of high nervous 
organization, and hence the evidence of fitness, as mani- 
fested through this index to the proper organization for 
speed producing qualities. No one can deny that ou r 
greatest, most uniform, consistent and successful race 
mares have proven the greatest speed producers. On the 
other hand, most every neighborhood has its fast but 
erratic broodmare, that leads all others in said ".ommun- 
ity as a speed producer. The dam of Arion 2:07}, was 
notoriously of this order, and this is by no means an 
isolated example. Give us a flinty textured, nervous, 
high-strung, "rattle-headed," well-bred mare, with 
natural speed, even though she will not carry an extreme 
clip more than a hundred yards, permit us to mate her 
with a well-bred, bold-going, level-headed, somewhat 
lymphatic, but resolute, sensible stallion, and we will 
take our chances on getting plenty of speed. Indeed, 
individual mating is more nearly the scientific Doint in 
speed breeding than in blood lines, though, of course, 
operations must be kept within good breeding as regards 
blood lines. — Western Horseman. 



A MOVEMENT is on foot among the campaigning 
horsemen of Northern Ohio to protest against heat 
booking on the tracks over which they race. The fact 
is that just as some big grand circuit campaigners have 
protested against early-closing stakes, these horsemen 
will protest against the books. Those directly interested 
in the movement claim they have nearly all the owners 
and drivers who race in Northern Ohio on their side, who 
are not only in full sympathy with the movement and 
will support it, but are extremely anxious to race at 
meetings where no bookmaking is done, and that they 
will sign the petition pledging themselves not to race on 
tracks where bookmaking takes place, Bays the American 
Sportsman. It is generally conceded that bookmaking 
was never intended for heat races, and a great many 
things that have brought tracks into bad repute are 
directly due to the freeness with which heats have been 
dropped when a horse's victory was assured. It ia also 
quite generally conceded that if the boc ks were elimin- 
ated from trotting tracks there would be less cause for 
looking for a more suitable contest than the three in 
five race, or for a shorter distance. In other words, the 
turf reforms that trotting track managers seem to think 
must come, and which they are trying to bring about by 
shorter races, would not be nece-sary if heat betting 
were stopped. A great many track managers have ad- 
mitted as much. But the trouble is that associations 
have run so close that they think they cannot get along 
without the revenue of the bookmaking privilege. Those 
who are interested in this movement claim that what an 
association would lose in revenue by ruling off the books 
could be made up, pretty nearly if not all, from the pool, 
selling privilege, though the increased patronage of the 
auction pools on the result of the race. The promoters 
of the movement claim their interest is only to establish 
a needed reform, and they feel certain that once a trial 
is given, the horsemen, tbe public and the associations 
will find the change of mutual benefit. 



A NEW TERRITORY is being opened up for the 
American trotter in the Old World. Horsemen in Po- 
land, seeing the excellent results achieved by Austrian 
breeders by the mingling of American trotting blood 
with that of native stock, have followed that example 
and will buy more extensively than ever before. In 
fact, very little has been done in that line in Poland, 
compared with other foreign horse centers. A wealthy 
Polish gentleman, with large estates near Warsaw, has 
sent four or five buyers to this country to look up and 
buy desirable animals. The first purchase of conse- 
quence that has been made for the Polish gentleman 
was completed last week by Matt Dwyer, of New York, 
who bought on a direct order from Poland, becoming 
the purchaser, through John McGuire, of the splendid 
stallion Dan Cupid, 2:09J, who has from time to time 
beaten many of the stallions which are now winning 
laurels and purses on the European tracks. For some 
reason an endeavor was made to keep the deal under 
cover, but it leaked out very soon after it was consum- 
mated, and as soon as the weather suits, probably not 



Jandary 27, 1900J 



53 



before April, the horse will be shipped to Poland. Dan 
Cupid was foaled in 1888 on the farm of 0. P. Alford, 
Lexington, Ky., and made his mark over the Lexington 
track in 1897. He is by Barney Wilkes, dam Aster- 
more, by Strathmore, second dam Asteria by Asteroid. 



CHAMPION SIRE AND RACE HORSE. 



FALROSE 2:19, sire of the best money winner on 
the California circuit will make the season of 1900 again 
at Woodland, where he is so highly thought of that 
nearly seventy mares were bred to him last year. Mr. 
Walter Mastin sent us the announcement and copy for 
an advertisement this week, but it arrived too late lor 
insertion in this issue. Falrose is a grand son ot the 
mighty Electioneer and is not only a magnificent indi- 
vidual but transmits that quality to all his get. Look 
out for the advertisement next week 



BOODLE 2:l2i is announced to make the season at 
San Jose. "Farmer" Bunch has him in charge and 
writes that the son of Stranger never looked better in 
his life. We will have a statement to make about this 
horse in our next issue that will be worth the time of 
breeders to carefully peruse. Nothing but facts will be 
stated and there will be a surprising array of them for 
those who have not studied this horses history and pedi- 
gree. 



MANY RICH STAKES are offered by the West- 
chester Racing Association to elose Tuesday, February 
6th. They are named in our advertising columns with 
the amount of added money in each and the distance to 
be run. Send to the office of the Breeder and Sports- 
man for entry blanks. 



Matinee Racing at Los Angeles. 



Los Angeles, Jan. 23, 1900. 

Editor B. & 8. — The matinee racing given by the Lo } 
Angeles Driving Club at the race track here last Saturday 
was very successful. A faBhionable and enthusiastic crowd 
of at least 200 people attended. The day was perfect and the 
sport considerably above the average, so that all went home 
in a jolly mood congratulating the members of the club on 
the successful carrying out of the days program. Such 
sport not only briDgs out large crowds but it increases the 
interest in legitimate horse racing and makes a demand for 
well bred horses, higher prices and a good market. 

The Club prohibits betting and in this way clean sport is 
assured. There was a brass band present which added an 
additional charm to the occasion. 

The first race was a one-half mile event, best two out of 
three heats. The event was won by R. B. Moorehead's 
Mowitza 2:20}, by Sondan, who took the first two heats; F. 
G. Schumachers' Photo was second in both heats; Mr 
Wilson's Speculator third; D. H Hart's 8easide fourth; Dr. 
Merritt Hitt's Princess, fifth. Time, 1:14, 1:08. 

The one mile dash, mixed race, free for all, was won by 
Willard Stimson's 8ophia R 2:14J; H. G. Bundrem's Burley 
P., second; M. M. Potter's Irene Crocker, third; Dr. W. W. 
Hitchcock's Dewey, fourth; J. D. Desmond's Medico, fifth. 
Time, 2:21. 

The quarter-mile dash, running race, was very exciting, 
particularly at the finish, when Llewellyn on Little May 
came under the wire first, with John G. Mott on Eetcbum 
half a length behind him, and M. M. Potter on H. V. N., 
Dr. LeMoyne Willis on Tig and J D. Desmond on High- 
ball at bis heels. Time :25 flat. 

The final race was a one half mile mixed heat race, fo r 
horses who have not made better time than 2:30, best two in 
three. Dr. M. L. Moore drove Tom, K. V. Redpath held 
the reins over Lumnox, and A. W. Herwig drove Nellie 
Boyd. Boyd won the first heat in 1:18, Lumnox, second; 
Tom, third. Lumnox won the second heat in 1:13; Bovd, 
second, and Tom, third. Tom won the third heat in 1:17 J; 
Boyd, second; Lumnox, third. The finishing heat will be 
run cff next Saturday. 

The judges were J. H. Shankland, J. M. Gilbert and H 
M. Henderson. Timers, C. H. Chandler, Lee May berry. 
Walter Maben acted as starter. 

This will probably be the last racing the Driving Club will 
give, as Secretary Thome of the Los Angeles Agricultural 
Park says it will not he allowed any more. He gives sev' 
eral reasons for this action. 

One is that there might be a suppression of time which is 
contrary to the rules of the parent association. This is one 
thing he should not be afraid of as this is a gentleman's 
driving club, and I think they are all gentlemen enongh 
not to suppress time. 

Furthermore, he says they are apt to allow outlawed horses 
start which is also cor trary to the National rules, but tb« 
president nf the Driving Club promises that if Mr. Thorne 
will give him a list of the horses which are outlawed, he will 
certainly not allow them to start in anv of the club's mces 

Not being able to get the use of the track here, the Driv- 
ing Club proposes building in the near future the finest half 
mile track in the west, with the necessary grandstand, club- 
house, stables, etc. Horse owners here are not only enthos - 
astic, but energetic, and have implicit confidence in the 
futnre prosperity of the horse industry id Southern Cali- 
fornia. Geo. T. Beckers 



McKinney *2:11 1-4 at Twelve Years of Age 
Has Eleven 2-15 Performers 



last three years, and still retains that championship. 
Being a race horse himself, he has sired race horses and 
in the following list of his standard performers there is 
not one but made his record in a race and is a race 
winner. 

TROTTERS. 



But one stallion ever had eleven of his produce in 
the 2:15 list by the time he was eleven years of age, 
and that is McKinney, the greatest son of Alcyone, as 
he was undoubtedly for his short lived opportunities 
the greatest son of George Wilkes, and he the greatest 
son of Hambletonian 10. Baron Wilkes, the great Ken- 
tucky sire, ranks next to McKinney in the number of 
2:15 performers at twelve years and he had but 6 in 
that exclusive list at the same age Judging by the 
past McKinney seems destined to be the greatest sire 
of 2:15 performers that ever lived. The following table 
gives the names of all stallions that have sired tenor 
more 2:15 performers and as will be seen there are but 



Zombro 2:11 

Hazel Klnuey 2:\2% 

Mc/.ens 2:13 

Dr. Book (4) 3:lfflf 

Cieo W. McKluuey 2:U% 

Osito 2:14% 

Mamie Riley 2:16 



Mahel McKinney 2:17 

McNally (4) 2:20 

Miss Baruabee (3) 

Sola 2:23 

Casco 2H^a 

i-ir Credit (3) 2 25 

Eula Mc (2) 2ul'/i 




twenty-one of them all told of which twelve are sons 
and two grandsons of Geo. Wilkes. This is a marvelous 
showing and is proof positive of the prepotency of the 
blood of that wonderful race horse and sire : 




18H7 
1884 
1882 
1882 
1881 
1881 
1880 
1881 
1879 
1879 
187W 
1879 
187* 
1M77 
]87fi 
1875 
1875 
1874 
1871 
1870 
I8R8 



McKinney bv Alcyone 

Chimes by Electioneer 

Ash'and Wilkes by Red Wilkes 

3aron Wilkes by Geo. Wilkes 

Gambetta Wilkes by Geo. Wilkes... 

Sidney hy Santa Claus 

wilkes B' y by Geo. Wilkes 

Wilton by Geo Wilkes 

Brown Hal by Tom Hal .... 

Guy Wilkes by Geo. Wilkes 

Pilot Medium by Happy Medium 

-immons by Geo Wilkes 

Adrian Wilkes by Geo. Wilkes 

Alcyone by Geo. Wilkes 

Alcantara by Geo. Wilkes 

Hourbon Wilkes by Geo. Wilkes. .. 

Onward by Geo. Wi kes 

Red Wilkes by Geo. Wi kes 

Robert McGregor by Msj Edsall.... 

Nutwood by Belmont 

Electioneer by Hambletonian 10 .. 



ro 












Eg 


if 


; 5' 


n CD 
: »-i 


ii 


it 


n 


3 


10 


3 


22 


6 


15 


3 


16 


4 


12 


2 


13 


1 


15 


1 


18 


1 


10 


1 


16 


1 


10 


1 


12 





26 





18 





20 





21 





18 





13 





12 






PACERS 

Coney (4) 2:07% I Juliet D 2 : 13U 

Jennie Mc 2:09 Havey Mc (3) 2:HU 

You Bet (S) .72:12^1 a 

This is a roll of honor that his owner, C. A Durfee of 
Oakland, is justly proud of and one that carries weight 
and conviction with it when read. In all the above list 
there is but one instance where the dam of the horse 
has produced a 2:80 performer when bred to any other 
stallion and that is in the case of 
the horse Dr. Book, whose dam 
produced Miss Jessie 2:14 when 
bred to Gossiper and Jenny Mac 
2:09 and Dr. Book 2:13% by Mc- 
Kinney. The last named horse 
was only a neck behind the win- 
ner in a race last year in 2:09 and 
will [get a mark below 2:10 this 
year sure if nothing happens him. 

One of the greatest arguments 
that the McKinneys are fast and 
game race horses is the confidence 
which the owners of colts and 
fillies by him place in them. In 
the Stanford Stake to be trotted 
this year at the California State 
Fair 'seven out of the fourteen en- 
tries upon which third payment 
has been made are by McKinney, 
while in the Occident Stake eight 
of the twenty-two colts or fillies 
still eligible were sired by that horse. Is there any- 
thing that could be said which would be stronger evi 
dence that his produce are "worth fooling with." 

i Hambletonian 10 



i f Alcyone.. . 



Geo. Wilkes.. 



(.Alma Mater.. 



( Dolly Spanker 

( Mambrlno Patchen 

I Estella by imp. Australian 



S l Rosa Sprague...-; 



f Gov Sprague 
I 



JRhoc" 
" ( Belle 



(.Rose Kenney-^ 



But sixteen stallions have sired 6 2:15 trotters and in 
this list McKinney is again the youngest. When age i< 
taken into consideration, and this is everything in 
weighing the speed producing virtues of a horse Mc- 
Kinney leads the world. The following are the stallions 
that have produced a half dozen trotters, with their aga 
reckoned up to the close of 1899: 

SIRES OF SIX 2:15 TROTTERS. 



McKinney 6 

Ohime« 8 

Baron Wilkes 13 

Klyria 6 

Stranger 6 

Wilton 9 

uy Wilkes 13 

Simmons 13 



Pilot Medium 10 

lay Bird „ 8 

Alcyone 7 

Alcantara 9 

Onward 11 

Red Wilkes 12 

Robt McGregor 11 

Electioneer 12 



The pedigree of McKinney as presented herewith 
shows that in his veins courses the blood that is in the 
very front ranks of race winning harness horses as well 
as that of race winning running horses. Alcyone Geo. 
Wilkes, Hambletonian 10, Mambrino Patchen Mam- 
brino Chief and Gov Sprague are some of the sires, and 
and the great Alma Mater, Belle Brandon and Rosa 
Sprague some of the broodmares in this rich and royal 
pedigree. 

McKinney 2 :11% is one of those individuals that com- 
bines in himself royal blood lines, grand individuality 
and wonderful prepotency. He is himself one of the 
squarest trotters most consistent performers and gamest 
race horses that ever lived. He started in twenty-eight 
races, of which he won twenty-five, a showing that has 
been equalled by few, if any, trotting sires in the world. 
He was twice second and once third, never being as far 
back as fourth or outside the money in any race in which 
he started. At four years of age he held two records— the 
champion four year old stallion record and the winner 
of the fastest eight heat race ever trotted up to that 
time. He has held the record of the sire of the greatest 
number of 2 :15 performers for a horse of his age for the 



Rhode Island 2:23 1 itj 

le Brandon by Hamb 10 
( Mambrino Mestenger 
[Kenny Mare by tfamb. Chiet 11 

McKinney's magnificent individuality is the admira- 
tion of every horseman who has looked him over. Badd 
Doble the leading reinsman of America, has seen many 
handsome stallions, and he says that McKinney is the 
grandest one of them all. His verdict is that of every 
good judge of a horse, and as will be seen from a snap 
shot taken a few days ago and reproduced on this page, 
no words of praise are too extravagant when describing 
his conformation and appearance He stands 15.3, 
weighs 1140 pounds and is a perfect type of the trotting 
horse. His color is a rich, dark glossy brown, his coat 
perfection and these qualifications he reproduces with 
great regularity. He has been bred to many gray maress 
but there is but one of his produce that could be called 
gray and he is almost black, although his dam is very 
light in color and all her produce but this one the same. 
All this, coupled with the fact that he is as sure a foal 
getter as there is in America, make him the ideal horse 
to breed to, if one wants speed, size, style, color, game 
racing qualities, sound legs and feet and an iron con- 
stitution. It is not often that these qualification- are 
found combined in one horse, but they certainly are in 
McKinney, and he has proved it on the track and in the 
stud. If the custom followed on large stock farms of 
developing all the produce of a stallion could be pur- 
sued with the McKinneys, there is no doubt in the 
world but he could have headed the list of producing 
sires of 1899, and there is an even chance that he will 
do so anyway in 1900. 

McKinney will make the season at Pleasanton this 
year at $75 and a number of very choice mares are 
already booked to him 



Potente, in all of his recent races, has shown himself to 
be possessed of a wonderful burst of speed and also the abil- 
ity to carry it over a distance of ground. He has repeatedly 
finished but a nose or a head behind the winner in record 
breaking performances and his defeat in most of the in- 
stances referred to may be attributed to the weak finishing 
powers of T. Walsh, who is his regular rider. With a com- 
petent pilot in the saddle this horse should be a very valu- 
able member of a first class racing stable and it is inconceiv- 
able that an owner should be so shortsighted as to throw 
away his chances of earning the big end of a parse by em- 
ploying a rider who cannot do justice to his mount. 



54 



[January 27, 1900 



The Sulky. 



The fairs of 1900 willjbe numerous in California. 



Thoksen Undebhill, who for several years had charge 
of the M. £. McHenry horses at Freeport, 111., died re- 
cently at Kacine, Wis. During the past few rears he was in 
the employ of the late J. 1. Case and remained in Racine 
after the Case trotting stock was disposed of. 



Horses are in training on nearly every track in the 8tate. 



That Northern California Circuit meets the approval of 
horse owners. 

There have bten already several first-class mares booked 

to Boodle 2:12$. 

Ben Kennky thinks Eyelet 2:06$, 'will beat the present 
champion record fur pacing mares next season. 



The recent dry weather has caused the speedway to be 
well patronized, and hot contests occur there daily. 



Five of the ten mares which Arthur] W. 2:11$. will be per- 
mitted to serve this year, have already been booked. 



G. Lapham is working a green pacer by Pilot Prince out 
of a ISteinway mare that is booked already for a mark of 2:15 
thio year. 

Mr. Campau says the probabilities are that the program 
of trie Detroit Driving Club will be about the same this year 
as it was last. 

The Los Angeles Driving Club will build a half mile 
track for its own use and will make it as perfect as possible 
for fast records. 

California has more mile tracks in proportion to its 
popuiniiun tban auy state in toe Union. There are very few 
half mile circles here. 

Matt Dwyer, who bought the gelding Dreyfus by Dexter 
Prince, daui by Valensin at auction for $1500, has twice been 
ottered $2500 lor mm. 

M.v ..ik H. 2:28}, dam of those good pacers Carbonate 
2:09, buipniae z:i>'.i{ and Beulah 2:14$, died recently at the 
Du tiois i* arm, Denver, Colo. 



Kentucky Union 2:07}, by Aberdeen, is not proving to 
be a pieasam roadster and it is said tnal she may .be sent to 
Village t arm to be bred toj Chimes. 



Milo Knox left last Saturday with a carload of horses for 
the oplao-Mewgass sale at Chicago which opens next Mon- 
day, lie bad twelve horses in the car. 



Allerton 2:09}, will make the season at Ashland Park 
Farm, near Lexington, Ky., now leased by Messrs. Miller 
& sioley and in charge of Charles Marvin. 



There is a two year old ally up in Oregon that is by 
Paihmunt out of a mare that traces to Direct 2:05$, and is 
said to be one of the coming fast ones to a certainty. 

The annual meeting of the directors of the Columbus 
Driving Park will be ueld the first of February, when the 
program of the Grand Circuit meeting will be decided upon. 



A prominent Austrian horseman says that, in his opinion, 
the best race Jnver in Europe is Horace Brown formerly of 
Buffalo, firuwu'u income in Europe is said to exceed $5000 
a year. 

Brook Curry has fifty yearlings in his stable at Lexing- 
ton. A large majority ol them are by Clay King, who had 
three yearlings lost year that were sold at an average price 

of $1700. 

Good prospects are being eagerly picked up by buyers who 
witsh to win some of the purses to be hung up this year. 
Young colts unless entered in stakes are not iu great demand 
however. 

Nutwood, the Mambrino Palchen of the present, the 
Electioneer of to-morrow, the very greatest all-round pro- 
genitor of speed and usefulness. — "Culujabus" in Western 
Horseman. 

James Dwain is handling at the Salinas track for Cberi 
Z Herbert a promising colt by McKinney out of Dolly, tbe 
dam of Bruno 2:16}, Altoonita 2:20$, Lara D. 2:23i and 
Black Bart 2:29. 

Dr. Fv. T. Leaner of 702 Market street, San Francisco, 
has a four year old cult that somebudy ought to buy and train. 
Her owner has no time to devote to him and wants to sell. 
Read his advertisement. 

The North Pacific Rural Spirit says that both Baker and 
Union counties in Oregon need new blood in tbe standard 
bred trotter and a good Wilkes or Electioneer stallion would 
be a splendid cruss fur the mares in those counties. 



Herbert Gray made an ofler of $25,000 for Jupe 2:07J 
on bebalf of T. W. Lawson, reports to the contrary notwith- 
standing, and the offer is still beiog considered by Owner 
Snell, of New Bedford, Mass. 

The Boer horses are said to be remarkably well trained, 
and when the 1'ransvaalers desire to form an ambush or fir- 
ing line their horses are taught to remain stationary as soon 
as tbey feel the reins dropped over their necks. 



The latest rumor regarding tbe possibility of a meeting at 
Louisville this season is to the effect that President Douglas 
has secured cuntrol of the track, and the prospects are that 
there will be a meetitg held some lime during the season. 



E. M. Graves, proprietor of the Hartford Opera House, 
Hartford, Conn., has wagered W. W. O'Brien $2500 to $10,- 
000 that his colt, Altoaine, will win the Kentucky Fuluri y 
in 1900. This bet is bona fide, and certified checks are now 
in the hands of Uhas. Loby. 



Two prominent breeders met with bad accidents recently, 
Edward Winters, proprietor of he Penn Valley Stock Farm, 
fell from a carriage and broke his shoulder blade, and W. E. 
Spier, proprietor of the Suburban Slock Farm, fell on the 
sidewalk in New York City, and broke his left arm. Both 
breeders are being successfully patched up. 



In Austria betlirg is not so heavy, perhaps, as it is here, 
but tbe mutual pools amount to from $4000 lo $10,000 on 
each race at the Baden and Vienna tracks. There is a tax 
on betting, there are no laws to prohibit it and the govern- 
ment encourages the sport by spending a large amount of 
money every year in tbe purchase of trotting stallions. 



Splendid pasturage is that to be had at the Brentwood 
Farm, Contra Cosia county. There are alfalfa fields and 
others with the choicest of natural grasses. The climate is 
unsurpassed. This combination and the good care given 
them puts flesh on the frame and good blood in the veins. A 
month or two up there will make a new horse out of tbe tired 
old fellow you are driving. 



"Farmer" Bunch has already bred hisgreat pacing mare 
Much Better 2:07}, to Boodle 2:12$. Much Belter held the 
four year old record for pacing mares year before last. The 
produce should be a good one The ''Farmer" has trained 
Boodle and gave his daughter Ethel Downs 2:10 and bis son 
Thompson 2:14$, as well as Much Better their records. He 
says the union above referred to suits his ideas exactly. 



J. M. Nelson, of Alameda, has added to his string the 
four year old pacer John A., by Wayland W. This hand- 
some young horse took a record of 2:14 as a three year old 
last year and out of three starts won once and was twice sec- 
ond. .Mr. Nelson thinks John A. will pace in 2:10 this year. 
Auolber very promising youngster in his string is a three 
year old by Alexis, first dam by Nutwood, second dam by 
Milton Medium. He is a trotter and fast. 



Robert Orr, of Hollister, has a very promising two year 
old colt which he calls Oro Guy, and with which he confi- 
dently expects to get part of the money in the Stanford Sti>ke 
at Sacramento in 1901. The colt is a handsome black fellow. 
He is by Oro Wilkes out of Roseate by Guy Wilkes, second 
dam Rosedale by Sultan, third dam Inez by The Moore, and 
as will be seen his sire is an inbred Wilkes and bis dam in- 
bred to The Moor. Henry Hellman is handling Oro Guy at 
the San Jose track. 

There is some talk of forming a Western trotting circuit 
with Sioux City, Omaha, Des Moines, St. Joseph, Red Oak, 
Independence and possibly Le Mars, in the circuit. A. B. 
Beall, of Sioux City, who has secured a lease on the Hioux 
City track, recently had a conference in Chicago with Secre- 
tary Steiner of the American Trotting Association, who 
favors this plan. With a strong circuit and some good 
purses, it is thought horsemen with fast animals would be at- 
tracted to the West, and some good racing would be tbe 
result. 

Kentucky Union 2:07}, the chestnut mare that Richard 
Croker recently purchased and presented to Nathan Strau", 
will probably be retired from the track and the speedway and 
used hereafter for breeding purposes. The blood-like 
daughter of Aberdeen has not proved to be an ideal road 
mare. Since coming into the possession of her new owner 
she has once or twice shown a disposition tc climb the trees 
in Central Park while out j >gging. Straus will probably 
breed her to Chimes, the sire of Fantasy 2:06, The Abbot 
2:06}, The Monk 2:08 and other livers. Kentucky Union is 
one of the best bred trotters in the 2:10 list. 



Buckman & Carrashek, the proprietors of tbat popular 
restaurant "The Saddle Rock" in Sacramento, offer for sale 
in this issue three good colts and one filly that are worth 
training. The colts are all three year olds, two being bv 
Waldstein, sire of Jack W. 2:12} and Humboldt Maid 2:13$ 
and other fast ones, out of mares by Noonday 10.000; the 
other also by Waldstein Jout of a Monroe Chief mare. The 
filly is a handsome black animal by Geo. Dexter 2:18$, and 
is a full sister to Telephone 2:24 J, her dam being Oakwood 
by Bob Lee, a son of Nutwood. These youngsters are all 
sound and ready to train and are good prospects. 



A difference of opinion relative to the merits and pros- 
pects of yearling trotters owned by William Russell Allen, 
of St. Louis, and George W. Archer, of Rochester, led to a 
novel match the day after the adjournment of the N. T. A. 
and A. T. A. peace conference at the Murray Hill Hotel. 
Both horsemen have made entries in the $20 000 Kentucky 
Futurity to be trotted in 1902. The owner of Kremlin 2:07} 
named two colts by that horse, and offered to bet Archer $100 
tbat one of these youngsters would get a better position in 
the race than would the best of Archer's trotters. The 
Rochester horseman accepted tbe proposition and named two 
foals by Brown Velvet, the son of Vatican. Hamilton Bus- 
bey was made tbe stakeholder. 



Andy Welch says regarding the early closing stake re- 
volt : "The whole move was a mistake. The people who 
are against them did not want tbe abolition of the stakes. 
What they really wished was a reduction in the cost of en- 
trance and they were right, but they placed themselves in a 
false position. Horsemen entering their stable two and three 
months in advance, should not pay so much as those who 
enter only two weeks in advance of the race meeting, as they 
take greater chances That's all there was to that. All of 
them are in favor of futurities, and if it were not for the lat- 
ter and the early closing purse races, the light harness horse 
would be worth very little. You would not see horses 
changing hands in the winter for thousands of dollars, if 
there were only purse races." 



SPEED WAY NOTES. 

Col. J. C. Kirk Patrick is using Walter Hobart's picer 
Our Dick 2:10}, on the Golden Gate Park drives and aston- 
ished all tbe road drivers with him last week. Harry Pat- 
rick says he was speeding Catinka 2:17} down the last quar- 
ter of the speedway one day and thought he was going some 
as his watch marked 33} seconds, but Col. Kirkpatnck 
passed him with Our Dick as though he were standing still, 
o he was not surprised when that gentleman informed him 
hat the son of Gibraltar had made the quarter in 31$ sec- 
tonds. 

J. H Ohlandt says he would hate to be challenged now 
for the O'Kane cup. His horse Harvey B. that won this 
trophy for him is entirely off and cannot trot fast enough to 
catch an ice wagon just now. 



Sidney Smith beats nearly everybody on the speedway 
with Primrose 2:13 by Falrose and the handsome little mare 
seems to be always ready for a brush. She can get to ber 
speed in forty feet. 

Charley Kapp will have to get a new horse or to go 
Pleasanton for bis sport. He sent I Direct to Tom Keating 
last Tuesday and the latter thinks Direct will have another 
2:10 performer this rear if Mr. Kapp's handsome little horse 
meets with no accidents. He bad that distemper which 
affected so many horses last year, but is entirely over it now. 



A stranger with a black trotter took a whirl at the 
speedway drivers last Thursday and went through the last 
half so fast that he only left a streak behind bim. The boys 
have all been on the lookout for the horse since to find out 
bow he is bred and other particulars. They call him the 
' black ghost" when referring to the incident. 



Dione 2:09}, the great little trotter bred and owned by 
Park Commissioner A. B. Spreckels, is about the sweetest 
thing in harness. She has not been headed yet, although 
Sidney Smith's gave her a close brush with Primrose the 
other day. 

Mr. W. C. Hammerton has a young horse that he is 
teaching road manners, and thinks he will be a speedway 
trotter before long. His old horse, Fairmount Prince, is 
now owned in Honolulu, and has led in many road brushes 
down there. 

Ex -Supervisor Aigelunger and Secretary F. M. 
Thompson, of the Golden Gate Park Driving Association, 
enjoy taking a drive together but have not yet eojoved the 
pleasure of being carried the last eighth at two minute clip, 



It is dangerous to figure too close on a foal to come as 
soon aa possible after January 1st. Snow Drop, by Mam- 
brino King, was bred to Dare Devil on a calculation that 
the foal would be the first of any importance in 1900 But 
Snow Drop diopped too earlv, on the night before Chiist- 
mas, and her daughter at New Year's Day, while but eight 
days old in fact, was one year old under the rule. Monioe 
Salisbury tried too close calculation once for the produce of 
Direct. The foal, like Snow Drop's, came late in December, 
and was appropriately named Too Soon. Many good names 
might be suggested for such misfits, such as Previous, Just 
Before, Ahead of Time, Mamma's Mistake, etc. — Turf, Field 
and Farm. 

Speaking of the speed shown on the New York drive, 
Jacob Justice of Philadelphia, who recently tried out Jack- 
sonian against New York's best, states that many of the 
horses over there are greatly overrated. Cobwebs, David B. 
an. I a few o hers are quite speedy, bul the average horses 
driven and lauded by turf writers are, Mr. Justice thinks, 
easily beaten. Jacksonian was driven daily by Mr. Justice, 
and was only beaten once on the speedway, and that by a 
young mare that has been extensively entered in stakes for 
next season down the grand circuit. Mr. Justice believes 
that his pair, Ottinger and Jacksonian, Frank Bowers' King 
Harry and John P. Stewart, or D. P. H. Nichols' Paragon 
and Kapolina could hold their own or probably pull out 
victors with any of the trotting teams the New York con- 
tingent could produce. Unless extra inducements for sport 
are offered at tbe local tracks next season, Mr Justice will 
take his team over to New York for a shy at the cracks. 
Several Buffalo men agree with Mr. Justice in his estimate 
of the New York speedway horses. 



City Editor Jo Mansfield of the Call is one of the 
regulars. He has been driving Maud Newman 2:17$ lately 
and is greatly pleased with her, but she can trot faster than 
he seems willing to ride. 



Horse Owners Should Use 
GOMBATJLT'S 

Caustic 
Balsam 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy. 

A SAFE, SPEEDY AND 
POSITIVE CURE. 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OR FIRINO 

Impossible lo produce any scar or blemish. The 
safest best Blister over used. Takes the plaos 
of nil liniments for mild or sevore action. Removal 
oil Bunches or Blemishes from Horses or Cattle. 

A» ft HUMAN REMEDY for Rheumatls n. 
Sprains, Sor#» Throat, Etc., it, is invaluable, 
■up ftlllBIUTCE that one ti hlnsponnfal of 

WE UUAKAN I tt caust c balsam win 

produce more actual results thnu 'whole bottle or 
any liniment or spavin cure miitu ever made. 

Every bottle of Caustic Ba^am sold is Warran- 
ted to give satisfaction. Price n .50 1»t bottle. BOH 
by dnnjuists. or sent by expree charKespnid. with full 
directions for itcuse. Bend lor descriptive circ Warn, 
testimonials, et^/Addresa X 
THE LAWRENCE- WILLIAMS CO.. Cleveland. Ohio 



January 27,*1900] 



55 




Emanuel Morris was seen in the saddle this week at 
Oakland; his first appearance after several years of enforced 
idleness. 

Sly has recovered from the attack of fever with which she 
has been suffericg and ran six furlongs, on two occasions, 
within the last week in 1:13. 

Pete Clay, the colored jockey, who rode Imp in her 
races last summer, is lying dangerously ill of pneumonia at 
one of the hospitals at New Orleans. 

Barney Schreiber's filly Sofala has won all four of her 
starts this season; this is a record never surpassed by a two 
year old filly and only equalled by May Hempstead. 



The Turf Congress Stake, which was run off last Saturday 
at Tanforan Park, was one of the most holly contested events 
ever witnessed on a local race track. Bannockburn proved 
to be the winner but Geyser forced him to run the mile in 
1:39 flit. Ziroaster and Advance Quard were both close up, 
less than two lengths separating the first four contestants. 
It seemed at first glance as if it were a wonderfally true run 
i ace, as no interference occurred during the race and every 
horse raa to bis best form; it may be barely possible that 
Spencer, made his run too late with Geyser as the horse 
made up a great deal of ground in the run through the 
stretch, and in view of the fact that Geyser conceded Ban- 
nockburn twelve pounds of actual weight a few days previous 
and beat him easily at seven furlongs it would seem that 
another meeting of the two would be necessary to decide 
which is the better horse. 



John £. Madden, it is reported, has secured second call 
on Jockey Odom for next season. OJom is under contract 
to ride lightweight for the WhitLey stable next season. 



The books were out of line on The Fretter laying sixteen 
to five about his chances-; the hoise has shown great improve- 
ment in his new owner's bands and twice within a week has 
run a mile better than 1:40. 



Dais? F., a daughter of Riley and Modesty (the first 
American Derby winner), ran a mile and a half over the 
Tanforan Course in the fast time of 2:32J, which is within, 
two and a quarter seconds of the world's record. 



Momentum ran a clever race on Tuesday stepping five 
furlongs in 1:02 flit with 141 lbs. in the saddle; and winning 
easily notwithstanding a long delay at the post which must 
have militated against her chances. 

The success of the Crescent City Jockey Club has already 
provoked a suspicion of future rivalry, and there is an 
undercurrent of talk that there may be two tracks in opera- 
tion in New Orleans another year, although nothing definite 
in this respect has developed as yet. 



A. L. Aste, owner of the Keusico Stable, has been en- 
deavoring to secure the services of a good jockey for next 
season. He has offered Jockey Clawson a good retainer, 
but as the conditions call for ClawBon to ride as low as 100 
pounds he will doubtless be unable to accept. 



If T. Walsh continues to ride in the present form shown 
by him at the current meeting at Oakland, his chances for 
the gold watch will not be very promising. On three occas- 
ions on Tuesday last his bad judgment was the cause of his 
defeat, although mounted on the best horse. 



Winning Stables and Jockeys. 

Up to the close of the meeting at Tanforan Park las t 
Saturday the stables that have won $505 and over in Califor- 
nia since the opening of the winter racing season were as 
follows : 



Barns & Waterhouse $15,035 

ECorrigan 11,87 > 

B Schreiber 11.170 

Dr H <J Rowell 8,835 

CarrutherB & Shields 6,9<5 

W SMelda _ 5,975 



Bessie Lee, who has been extensively touted on several 
occasions, finally succeeded in earning winning brackets. 
Bullman brought her in in advance of a fair field of horses 
with fifteen to one about her. The mare was well backed by 
her owner and his friends and several books lost heavily 
over her victory. 

Georok M. Hendrie has been re-elected President of the 
Highland Park Club of Detroit; J. W. Price, Vice-President, 
and Walter O. Palmer, Secretary. At a recent meeting the 
dates for the Canadian Circuit were discussed. Highland 
Park will open June 12. h, Fort Erie will follow and then the 
horses will go to Montreal. Definite dates will be announced 
later. 

The Hon. W. C. Whituey has bought of T. H. Stevens of 
the Walnut Hill stock farm the bay mare Jessie S., by 
Buckra, out of Florimore, price $1000. Mr. Whitney has 
also bought of T. C. McDowell the chestnut mare Georgia 
Frederick, by imp. George Frederick, out of the Maid of 
Honor, price $1200. They have been shipped to Wtslbu y, 
New jersey. 

Secretary W. P. Frazkr, of the Ontario Jockey Club' 
writes that the spritg meeting at Woodbine will begin on 
Thursday, May 24ih, and continue to include Stturday, 
June 2d. This will give nine days of racing. TheQieen's 
Plate will be run on the opening day. There will be no 
purse of less than $400 on the program, announcement of 
which will be made in a short time. 



Yellowtail ran a wonderful race in the Follansbee 
Handicap; carrying 123 lbs. he negotiated the seven furlongs 
in 1:26, coast record time. This horse, although possessed 
of great speed, is a rather poor specimen of a race horse. 
When pitted against fir- 1 class company he is usually defeated 
in slow time, generally finishing outside the money; but 
when opposed to a field of selling platers he runs one of his 
phenomenal races. 

The Ltttle Rock Jockey Club stakes for 1900 closed lass 
week. There are three stake events viz: Turf Congresg 
sweepstakes, for three year olds; the Tennessee Brewine 
selling sweepstakes, for two year olds and upwards, and tbg 
Turf Congress sweepstakes, for two year olds The meetint 
will open March 26 h and continue six days and possibly un- 
til the opening of the Memphis meeting. The purees will 
amount to about $12,000. The betting ring is to be open to 
all reputable bookmakers who may draw in at the regular 
prices. The club officers are well pleased with (he outlook 
for the meeting. 



Mayor Clare, of Sacramento, who began his first term 
with the new year, has sent the following communication to 
the Board of Trustees, along with an ordinance which he 
had drawn up by the city attorney and which will cer- 
tainly close the pool rooms if enforced : "I feel it my duty 
to call your attention to a constantly increasing evil in this 
community, which demands at your hands and mine prompt 
and energetic action. The pool rooms as conducted here are 
a menace to our boys and young men, and to the morals of 
our city. The most seductive as well as the most pernicious 
form of gambling is by the process of selling pools on races 
run outside this city, taught to young men and fastened upon 
those who have any failing in that direction. I could recall 
to you specific instances where the pool rooms of Sacramento 
have ruined clerks and others. I can give you, if you desire, 
the names of young men of gocd parentage, who formerly 
led respectable lives, and who are now seiving sentences in 
our jsils because of the pool rooms. It is a matter of local 
history that these rooms have done more harm to the youth 
of our cities than all the gambling that has been carried on 
in our city since its incorporation. There is no division of 
sentiment in the community with regard to the suppression 
of these rooms. On all bands and from all classes there is a 
demand that this evil be suppress, d. I ask you to unite 
with me in destroying them. No argument can be used in 
their behalf; they are capable only of evil. I recognize that 
it is no small matter to close these pool rooms, and that at- 
tempts in the past have not met with great success. I feel 
confident however, that with your assistance in passing the 
ordinance which I send to you herewith, I shall have no 
difficulty in doing my full duty in the premises, and shall 
succeed in riding Sacramento of its worst gambling curse. 
The ordinance which I enclose to you with this message has 
been drawn with care and meets every objection that the 
Courts have hitherto made to ordinances of that kind. I 
feel assure.) that the ordinance will be upheld by the Courts 
and in the interest of public morals in this community, it be- 
half of our boys and our youth, I ask you to pass it.'' 



The Stallion Stake. 



G Summers »i,:00 

A W Stotesburg 1,200 

A J Siemler 1,170 

Earnshaw Brothers 1,165 

D Han Ion 1.060 

A M l.inuell 1,050 



J F Schorr 5 9.)5 S P Taie 1,050 



Walter Jennings 6.J20 

PRyan 6.025 

J G Brown & Co 4.550 

J Coffey 3,920 

Pueblo Stable 3.695 

Caesar Young 3,585 

Remsen Stable - 3,545 

Louis Ezell 8.175 

Alameda Stable 3,210 

A B Spreckels _ 3.140 

E J Baldwin 3.045 



The entries to the Stallion Stake to be run by two year 
olds at the California State Fair of 1902 closed January 1st 
with Secretary Peter J. Shields and from the following list 
it will be seen that 75 stallions have been nominated and all 
of their produce for 1900 will be eligible to entry in this 
great tsake which will be worth at least $15,000: 
Magnet by Imp. St. Blaise— Magnetic ; Burlingame Stock Farm. 
Sam Lucas by imp. The III Used Mehallah: Burlingame Stock Farm. 
Yo El Rey by Joe Hooker— Marion; esiate of Jas G Fair. 
Figaro by Fouso— Mertje; Dr H E Rowell. 
Imp. Reggy by Hermit— Nyl Gau; Cbaa Kerr. 
W illiam O' B by Apache— Flora ; Chas Kerr. 
Aliamax by imp Maxim— Altitude; Burns & Waterhouse. 
Mt. McGregor by Day Stir— imp. Miss McGregor; Burns & Water- 
house. 

El Rio Rey by Norfol k- Marion : Theodore Winters. 
Rey del Sierras by Joe Hooker— Marion; Theodore Winters. 
Uncie Je6s by Sir Modred— Prccoisa: W Lopez. 
Satsumahy Macduff— Albertha ; H C Rowell. 
Crescendo by Flambeau— imp. lauet N; J N Burke. 
Imp Ormonde by Kayon D Or— 1 illy Agnes: WO'B MeDonough. 
St. Cirlo bv imp. St. Blaise— Ca-rln-i ; W O'B MeDonough. 
Orsini by imp. Ormonde — Jongleuse; W O'B MeDonough. 
Ossary by imp. Ormonde— imp. Countess Langden; W O'B Me- 
Donough. 

Imp Sain by St, Serf-The TaBk; B Schreiber. 

Imp. Foul Shot by Musket— slander; Barney Schreiber. 

Balgowan by straihmore — Trinketat: Barney Schreiber. 

Ruinart by St. Carlo— Queen Alto; Rulnart stock Farm. 

Imp. Artillery by MusKet— Ouida; ECorrigan. 

Riley by Longfellow— Geneva; ECorrigan. 

Ducat by imp Deceiver— Jennie Flood; E Corrigan. 

Vassal by JIIb Johnson— Vixen; E Corrigan. 

Lew Weir by Longfellow— Latonia; E Corrigan. 

Amigobyimp Prince Charley— Mis.-oun Belle; E J Baldwin. 

Rey Kl Santa Anita by Imp. Cheviot— Aloha; E J Baldwin. 

Santiago bv Grinstead— Clara D; E I Baldwin. 

Emperor Norfolk by Norfolk— Marion; E J Baldwin. 

Loaan by Voltiguer— Pert; A Shields. 

King William II by Spendthrift— imp. Kapanga; Murray & Purser. 

Yankee Doodle by Prince Royal— imp Manzanita; Murray & Purser. 

Tbornhill by imp. Cheviot— Phoebe Anderson; Wm M Murray. 

Cyclone by St. Martin— Kinlock ; S F Capps. 

Liberii e by Leonatus— Falalse; J G Brown. 

Bright Phoebus by Falsetto— Cinderella; Walter Hobart. 

George K Smith by Iuspector B— North Anna; E F Smith. 

San Marco by St Blain- Round Dance; Mil er & Blazer. 

Imp Trentota by Trentou— G"ndoli ; Tho* G Jones. 

Imp Crighton by Clieveden— Ghlnnt Ghinnl; A B ppreckels. 

Eolo by KoluB— War Song; A B Si rockela. 

Imp The Judge by Loyalist— British Queen ; A B Spreckels. 

Puryear D by Deceiver— Ada C; A B Sp-eckels. 

RavelBton by Flambeau— Shanuon Rose: A B Spreckels 

Trappean by imp Inverness— imp La Trappe; A B Spreckels. 

Gen'I Miles by Falsetto— Hypatia; A B spreckels. 

Wernbergby Muscovy— Holmdel; L A Blasingame. 

Homer by Shannon — Sally Gardner; Ira Ramsdel. 

Imp True Briton by John Bull— Ruby; R D Lengett. 

Imp Friar Tuck by Hermit— Romping Girl; Thos Boyle. 

Imp Brutug by McGregor— imp Teardrop; C T Boots. 

Imp Midlothian by Rataplan— Lufra; lohu Mackey. 

Ben Ali by Virgil— Ulrica ; ;John Mackey. 

Torso by Belgerlue— Santa Lucia; John Mackey. 

Spurnwell by Imp Duncombe— Springtime; John Mackey. 

Briar Hill by imp Duncombe— Briar BuhIi; John Mackey. 

Candlemas by Hermit- Fusee; Rancho del Paso. 

Imp Duncombe by Speculum— Fair Helen; Rancho del Paso. 

Imp Juvenal by Springlleld— Satire; Rancho del Paso. 

Salvator by Prince Charley— Sallna; Rancho del Paso. 

Imp Dareblo bv The Peer— LurllDe; Rancho del Paso. 

Imp Golden Garter by Bend'Or -Sandia; Rancho del PaBO. 

IroD Order by Beud'Or— Angelica: Rancho del Paso. 

Imp 8t Andrew by St Simon— Maid of Perth; Rancho del Paso. 

Imp star Ruby by Hampton— Ornament: Rancho del Paso. 

Imp Bassetlaw by St Simon— Marquise ; Rancho del Paso. 

Maiello by Maxim Danlella: Rancho del Paso. 

Sir Modred by Tr»du< er— Idalla: Rai'Cho del Phbo. 

Imp Goldfinch by Ormonde— Tblatle; Rancho del Paso. 

Imp itGatlen bv The Rover— St Edltha; Rancho del Paso. 

Moreno by Morello— Ladne; D S Cone. 

Cicero by Longfellow— Belle Knight; M F Tarpey. 

El Rayobv Grl'igtead — 'unlit: M F Tarpey. 

Indlo by Maxim— by Imp Ira; E Corrigan. 



Appleby _ 1,030 

1 Morehouse 1,045 

A Simmons 1,010 

Marcus Daly _ 1,005 



J C Humphrey.. 

S F Capps 

Hugh Jones 

Cr»ii8 it Owen.. 

P Moore 

P E Smith 

J J Grant . 



925 
945 
980 
9 
900 
910 
880 



C F Durnell 2,965 Dan McCarty 855 



M Storn 2,915 

J J Moran - 2.645 

W D Randall 2.550 

CLind 2.400 

J Foley 2.440 

H J Jones „ 2,305 

J Carroll 2,3i>0 

W B Sink Jr 2,080 

J 8 Gibson 2,045 

W Fisher 2,015 

Foster* Hackett.. 1,906 

True Briton Stable 1,980 

Cambridge Stable 1.830 



E Lanigan. 

K Hubbell _ 

H I Oriffln 

W Murry 

H M -chwartz 

McConnell & Co.... 
Miss M O'Connell . 

W J Spiers 

J R Thomas , 

M J Collins 

E Purser 

C Spooner 

J N Drake., 



850 
850 
815 
800 
800 
790 
775 
745 
750 
775 
726 
760 
720 



E Kennedy 1.815 C W Cnappell 70b 



C F Boots 1,775 

T E McLaughlin 1,775 

Don Cameron 1.730 

J H shields 1,670 

O P Romigh 1 615 

R Hughes I,6e5 

W P Fine 1 600 



H C Ahlers.. 

N S Hall , 

Holman & Hollis.. 
Dr I W O'Roukb... 

G W Baldwin 

Partington Bros..., 
J L Crooks . 



700 
675 
670 
655 
650 
600 
605 



WLStanfield 1,575 G Deming 625 

D S Fountain 1,555 C G White 575 

E F Edwards 1,540 John McCaffrey 550 



Dobs & Co 1,530 

T G Ferguson 1,525 

G W Miller 1,4 

EF8mlth 1,400 

F Phillips 1.395 

P Hildreth 1,120 

McMahon & Gerhardy 1,280 

Dan Honig 1,275 



F. J. O'Rouke . 

smith & Smythe 

P Corrigan 

J D Fitzgerald 

J B Dyer 

J Hutchinson 

Mrs M J 8mith 

Smith & Abrahams.. 



The list of jockeys that have 
during the season up to the close 
foran is as follows, together with 

Jockey. 

Thorpe 

E. Jones 

Burns 

Bullman 

Spencer 

Vittitoe 

T. Walsh 

J. Ward 

J. Martin 

Jenkins 

Ruiz 

Songer 

J. Walsh 

Henry 

Ranch 

Devin 

Monnce 

E. Ross 

Buchanan 

Conurn 

Phelan 

Con ley 

Stuart , 

Morgan 

H. Sbields 

Piggott 

Postel 

Johnson 

N. Hill 

Duffy 

Bergen 

Bozeman _ 

Blair 

Fauntleroy 

Frawlcy 

Glover 

Helnson 

Keilus: 

Met Jloskey 

Macklin 

Mills 

J. Woods 

Basslnger 

Klley 

Morse 

W. Narvaez 

Powell 

8. Turner 

Joe Weber 

J. C. WilBon 



500 
545 
525 
626 
545 
520 
545 
605 



ridden one or more winners 
of the last meeting at Tan- 
their records for the season. 



1st. 


2d. 


3d. 


Unpl. 


75 


66 


48 


92 


49 


40 


41 


115 


41 


28 


34 


55 


40 


31 


13 


77 


37 


27 


29 


51 


37 


22 


26 


74 


29 


34 


40 


112 


28 


15 


15 


39 


26 


30 


21 


90 


25 


21 


23 


50 


23 


18 


11 


61 


18 


14 


22 


49 


18 


9 


10 


29 


15 


24 


30 


127 


13 


14 


18 


62 


10 


15 


8 


40 


9 


13 


16 


35 


8 


9 


11 


87 


6 


6 


16 


31 


6 


7 


5 


43 


6 


3 


7 


45 


6 


9 


12 


45 


5 


7 . 


8 


59 


4 


16 


11 


67 


3 


6 


1 


17 


3 


3 


1 


17 


3 


6 


5 


29 


3 


7 


5 


39 


3 


1 


3 


81 


3 


8 


5 


20 


2 


4 


9 


32 


2 


1 


3 


16 


2 


2 


1 


8 


2 


4 


5 


30 


2 


4 


1 


12 


2 


3 


2 


14 


2 


6 


4 


59 


2 








10 


2 


7 


2 


11 


2 


2 


6 


24 


2 








3 


2 


6 


6 


21 


1 


2 


8 


25 


1 


3 


2 


21 


1 


14 


13 


29 


1 


8 


4 


31 


1 


1 





30 


1 


2 


1 


18 


1 


5 


3 


21 


1 


1 


1 


14 



A Greater Grand Oirouit. 



W. J. Ijams, President of the American Trotting Associa- 
tion recently stated that in his opinion the Grand Circuit 
should cover the entire season of important harness racing 
and include all of the leading trotting tracks of the East and 
Middle West. Under the present arrangement the Circuit 
comes to an end six weeks before the season is over, leaving 
the campaigning stables to scatter and go in all directions, 
some to one meeting and some to another. Mr. Ijams (aid 
his idea would be some arrangement like this : Open (he 
Circuit at Detroit, as usual in July, which is about the time 
that most of the high-class horses are ready to begin their 
campaign. From there go to Cleveland, then to Columbus 
and perhaps to Fort Wayne, if tbey want to come in. Or go 
from Columbus to Buffalo, then to Glens Falls, Boston, 
Hartford and New York. That will fill out the season to 
the second week in September, when the Circuit usually 
ends. 

"After the last of the Eastern meetings (he horses begin to 
turn in the direction of Lexington for the Kentucky Breed- 
ers' meeting in October. Now I would extend the Grand 
Circuit so as to include the Lexington event and would take 
the horses there bv wav of Pittsburg and Terra Haute. There 
is a new one mile track at Pittsburg and all the conditions 
seem to be favorable for one of the best trotting meetings in 
the country. As for Terre Haute, we have given trotting 
meetings there for ten years pas', that were up to the Grand 
Circuit standard, although we never have been members of 
that circuit. We want to join the big league in 1900 and 
hope to get the dates preceding those of the Lexington 
meeting. 



56 



[January 27, 1900 



In Training at Walnut Grove. 



Brighton Beach Entries. 



Walnut Gbove, January 22, 1900. 
Mr. Editor: — Thinking that a few lines from Walnut 
Grove, where the Walnut Grove Stock Farm, owned by Mr 
Alex. Brown, is located, might interest some of the readers 
of the Breeder and sportsman, I send the following list 
of horses which Mr. Brown has in training at the farm with 
the hope that he may see some of them in the front rank 
again the coming season: 

TROTTEB8. 

Lottie 2:16£ by San Diego, dam by Whippleton. 
Sable Frances 2:17 J by Hable Wilkes, dam by Almont. 
Prince Ansel 2:20J by Dexter Prince, dam by Aneel. 
Adibala, green, b» Dexter Prince, dam by Whips. 
Piocha, green, by Dexter Prince, dam by Electioneer. 
Derbyo, green, by Chas. Derby, dam by Le Grande. 
Carrie M., green, by Diablo, dam by Alaska. 

PACEBS. 

Sable Le Grande 2:171 by Sable Wilkes, dam by Le 
Grande. 

Msjella B. 2:29 by Nushsgak, dam by Le Grande. 

Steinwood, green, by Steinway, dam by Ansel. 

These horses are all four year olds and over, so that those 
that will do, will be raced in the aged classes. The record 
horses in the lot are well known, and the green ones all 
quite promising. We have quite a number of admirers of the 
horse of America in this vicinity, including Dr. Martin, our 
resident physician, owner of a fine road mere by Boydell> 
dam by Geo. M Patcher; Mr. Len Thisby, owner of a good 
mare by Azmoor, dan by Piedmont and a very promising 
colt bv Taric, son of Guy Wilkes, out of this mare. 

Mr. Robert Thisby who has a fist road mare by Dawn 
2:1*;, dam by Whipples Hambletonian, and a fine colt bv 
Taric out of her. 

Mr. Wm Goodman, owner of Hattie W., by Alaska dam 
of Carrie M., in Mr. Brown's stables. 

Mr. D. H. Mathews owner cf a grandson of Electioneer 
and some other good ones, so you see the trotting horse is 
not without a friend in the tules. I i lk. 



Many individuals who are endowed with a sanguine de- 
sire to "rip the tail" out of the bookmakers' strong-boxes 
find consolation in criticism of a caustic nature whenever a 
"case bet" goes wrong. The boy who rides (could he hear 
the remarks) has the choice of a selection of heart-to-heart 
phrases that would worry him down to weight for a month 
of Sundays. A recent ride at the last Tanforan meeting was 
commented on by a choice coterie made up of pikers, touts 
and also a scribe or two. The all-wise representative of a 
daily paper was particularly voluble in bis comment on a 
certain j ickey's performance. One of his audience happened 
to be a j >ckey who has been mixed up in many hot finishes 
for years past and knows the game thoroughly. When the 
oracle quieted down, he remarked in an offhand way, "Well, 
I'd like to see some of you rubes sittin' in the bunch comin' 
down the stretch; I'll tell vou, I wouldn't want to be the 
Chinyman what washes yer shirts ! " 



John A. McKerbon (3) 2:1 2 J, owned by that splendid 
young Cleveland reinsman, Harry E. Devereux, is to be 
specially fitted for the wagon record this season. He is now 
a five year old and has had a year's complete let-up. Mr. 
Devereux sails for Europe next week to be absent till March 
15th. All will wish him bon voyage. He is an ornament 
to the owners' brigade and without a peer among amateur 
reiusmen. 

W. B. Sink Jr. cut loose a good thing in Almendral, a 
fine looking ton of St. Carlo, who, making his first public 
appearance on Wednesday, won a five furlong dash in a 
workmanlike manner, standing a long drive and finally win- 
ning by a bead. Mr. Sink and his friends backed the entry 
down a couple of points and took quite a goodly sum out of 
the ring. 

F. W. Brode seems to have regained the high class form 
shown by him last summer throughout the Middle West. 
On Monday he was a close second to Yellowtail in a seven 
furlongs race run in record time and on Wednesday he ran 
the Futurity Course in 1:10 fiat, defeating a good field of 
three year olds with ridiculous ease. 



Rosinante, Jimmy Coffee's white faced daughter of 
Charaxus and Ethie stepped a mile and an eighth over the 
Oakland course in 1:52 flat which is within half a second of 
the world's record. 

Thompson 2:14J was sold this week by J. B. Bonetti to 
B. O. Van Bokkelen for an eastern capitalist for $1200. 
Thompson is one of the best big horses ever raised in this 

State. -g 

Josfph Thayer, a prominent Lexington horseman, is 
visiting in California and looking at some of our trotting 

prospects. 

Ponoo finally succeeded in winning a race after knocking 
repeatedly at the door in his previous efforts. 



Secretary T. M. Jackson of the Brighton Beach eecds us 
the list of entries for the stakes to be run at its meeting this 
year, as follows: 

First Attempt Stakes 86, The Undergraduate Stakes 62, The Winged 
Foot Handicap 77, The Electric Handicap S3, The Distaff Stakes 80 
The Spinster gtakea 70, The Rising Generation Stakes 58, The Atlantic 
Stakes 72. The Choice Stakes 71, The Moniauk Stakes 74. The Nautllng 
Stakes 57, The Saragossa Stakes 37, The Sea Gull Handicap : 2, The 
Ulen Cove Handicap 47, The Babylon Stakes 59, The PecoDic Slakes 
53, The Seagate Stakes 55, The Test Handicap 42, The Flight Handi- 
cap 48, The Brighton Cup 44, The Sea Cliff Stakes 37. The Islip Stakes 
44, The Jamaica Stakes 37, The Punchestowu Stakes 57, The Chantilly 
Stakes 46. The Brighton Handicap 60. Total 1488, which is 131 more 
than the total in the same events last year. 

Entries to the Brighton Cup of $100 each or $25 if de- 
clared out by May 15th. Starters to pay $100 additional. 
$5000 added: 

Bangle. Sydney Lucas, Ethclbert, Gonfolon, Prince of Melbourne' 
Herbert, Tellmarch, Imp, Kirk wood, Sarmatian, Posthaste, Prince 
McClurg, John Bright, Yoloco, Col. Roosevelt, Standing, George 
Keene. Royal Sterling, Jean Beraud, Admiration, Rush, Killashan- 
dra. Moutanlc, Chacornac, Petruchio, Toddy, Ten Candles, Motley 
Zeus, Barton, Lieut. Gibson, Approval, Kilmarnrck Mischievous, 
Kaffaello, Rifle. Elfin Conlg, Batten, Filament, Kjrat, Klnley Mack. 
Lamplighted, Previous, Warrenton. 

Entries to Brighton Handicap, for three y.-ar olds, $200 
each, half forfeit, or $15 if dcclaied by February 20, 1900 
$5000 added: 

Ethelberl, Imp, Jean Beraud, Batten, Kinley Mack, Voter, Chacor- 
nac, Administration, Kaffaello, Half Time, Rush, Algol, Box. Lleber 
Karl, Approval, Piiuce McCurg, Autumn, Previous, Krlss Kringle' 
Warrenton, The Kentucklan, Jack Point, Wait Not, Kilmarnock! 
Mon tonic, Grayfeld, Latson, f-ydney Lucas Petruchio, Star Bright 
Herbert, Strathconan, Sarmatian, Decanter, David Garriek, ivfartl- 
mas, Ellin Conig, Mill Stream, John Bright, Prince of Melbourne, Sir 
Herbert, Gonfolon, Bangle, La Borgia, Marlhert. imp. Eddie Burke, 
Mischievous. Scannel, Standing, Col Rcosevelt, Motley, Killashaudra i 
Gold Or, Azucena, Lamplighted, Mesmerist, Missionary, Ventoro 
Anjou, All Gold, 

In the six stakes closing August 22, 1899, entries were re- 
ceived as follows : 

For the Brighton Junior of $10,000, to be run in 1900, for two year 
olds, three-quarters of a mile, 137 entries. 

For the Neptune Stakes, $5000, for two year olds, to be run in 1900 
three-quarters of a mile, 116 entries. 

For the Venus Stakes of 13000, to be run in 1900, fo- fillies, five and 
a half furlongs, 77 entries. 

For the Brighton Derby of 110,000, to be run in 1901, one mile and a 
half, 109 entrits. 

For the Iroquois Stakes of (5000, to be run in 1901, one mile and a 
quaiter, 111 entries. 

For the Brighton Oaks of $3500, to be run in 1901, for fillies, one 
mile and an eighth, 77 entries. 

For the two slakes closing Dec. 30, 1899. 

For the Foxball of $15,000, for two year olds, three-quarters of a 
mile, to be run in 1901, 154 entries. 

For the Produce StakeB of $15,000, for two year olds, to run in 1902 
three-quarters of a mile, 295 entries. 

An Official Announcement. 

Chico, Cal., Jan 19, 1900. 
Editor Breeder and Sportsman — Dear Sir: — Repre- 
sentatives of the Fair Associations from Yolo, Yuba, ColuBa 
Glenn, Tehama and Butte counties met last night a<.d de- 
cided to give race meetings in the several counties named 
and on dates as follows : 

Colusa July 23d to 28th 

Willows July 30th to August 4th 

Red Blufi August 6th to 11th 

Chico August 13th to 18th 

Marysville August 20th to 25th 

Woodland.. August 27 to September 1st 

It was agreed that each Association is addition to the 
usual purses would give four nomination purses of $1000 
each. 

Two harness and two saddle events each day. 
Between $50,000 and $60,0<>0 will be offered by these six 
Associations. The utmost harmony ptevailed and for the 
first t me the associations north of Sacramento have united 
and pooled their interest 

I was instructed to inform your j urnal of the meeting and 
that the associations claimed the dates Rtated above. 

Very respectfully, 

A. G Simpson, Sec'y. 

E. G. Dyer, of Palo Alto, is offering for sale two mares, 
one Rubie, chts'out mare, four years old, by Elyria 67*9, 
record 2:25$, son ot the great Mambrino King; and the other 
Jennie, chestnut mare, thoroughbred, by Intruder. These 
mares can be seen at Palo Alto. * 

Tanf jran Park Summaries. 

I WESTERN TURF ASSOCIATION.] 
THURSDAY, JANTARY 18. 

Six furlongs. Selling. Three year olds. Purse 1400— Limerick 109 
(E Jones) 6 to 5 won, Racetlo 109 second, SiBquoc 109 third. Joe Mc- 
Gee, Aborigine, Burdock, Will Fay, Billy Moore, Uppercrust. 
Time 1:14%. 

8U furlongs. Belling. Three year olds and upward. Purse $400— 
Jingle Jingle 98 (Walsh) 6 to 1 won. Bugden 100 second. Racivan 102 
third. Montallade. Good Hope, Kosalbra, Allenna. Genua, Maud 
Fergusou, Momentum, Alleviate, Miss Marion, Mike Rice, Sallie 
Goodwin. Time 1:14. 

Six fur'ongs. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse $100— 
Harry Thoburn 1,0 (Thorpe) 9 to 2 won, Theory 109 second, Clonallla 
112 third. Mountebank. Time 1:13. 

One mile and a quarter Belmont stake. Three year olds and up. 
ward. Value $120o— Zoroaster 116 (Jenkins) 9 to 5 won, Potente 108 
second, Daisy F. 109 third. Rosormonde, Topmast, Meadowthorpe, 
Forte. Time 2:06. 



Five and a half fur ongs Three year olds and upward. Purse $400 
— Timemaker 120 (Jenkins) 6 to 1 wod. Sardine 99 second, Yellowtail 
104 third. Diomed, Mafada. Time 1:06V 

Seven furlongs. Four year olds ant upward. Purse $4(0-Ban- 
nockbum 112 (Bullman) 3 to 10 won. OUnthus 99 second, San Venado 
112 third. Kate Gibbons, Slromo, Terrene. Time 1:26%. 

FRIDAY JANUARY 19. 

Three furlongs. Selling. Three year olds. Purse $lC0-8ofala 110 
(Bullman) 7 to 10 won, Rathgar 104 second. Moonbrlght 105 third. 
Location, Ada Fox. Core. Princess Leota. Time 0:35%. 

Five ftirlrngs. Selling. Three year old* and upward. Purse $400— 
Tizona 96 (Henry) 12 to 1 won. Gold Baron 105 second, Grion 10 1 third 
Melvin Btirnham, Loua Marie, Red Cherry, Ann Page, My Dear, 
Cymona, Indra 

One mile. Selling. Three year olds and upward. Purse $400— 
Facade 104 (Vittitoe) SO to 1 won, Grand Sachem 109 second, Tom 
Cromwell 122 third Merops, Tirade, Racivan, Monda, Chimura, 
Dixie Land, Gre\ hurst, luverary II. Time 1 :42, 

One mile and an eighth. Hurdle Selling. Four year olds and 
upward. Purse $400- Major S. 125 (3ulllvan) 3 to 1 won, Monita 147 
second, Lomo 104 third. University, J. O. U. Credo, Granger, 
Time 2:06. 

One mile Selling. Three year olds and upward Purse $5(10— 
The Lady 85 (J Walsh) 7 to 2 won. Merry Boy 101 second, Catastrophe 
107 third. Harry Thoburn, Red Pirate, Bishop Reld, Rainier. 
Time 1:14%. 

Seven furlongs. Three year olds and upward. Furse $100— Norford 
104 (J. M»rtin) 15 to 1 won, Owyhee 114 second, Alghan 119 third. 
Senora Caesar, Tempo, March Seven, dan AuguBtlne, Redwald, 
Beautiful Bill, Cipriauo, Tom (smith. Time 1:28%. 

8ATURDAY, JANUARY 20. 

Three and a half furlongs. Two years old. Purse 8100— Kingstelle 
104 Bullman I to 2 won. M. F. Tarpey 111 second. Grafter 108 third. 
St. Rica, Bride Ale, Carlooian. The Gafflr. Time 0:12. 

One mile and a halt Selling. Three years old and upward- 
Purse $400- Daisy F. 104 T Walsh 3 to 5 won. Topmast 107 second' 
Chimura 100 third. Meadowthorpe, Billy McCloskey. Time 2:32^- 

Six furlongs Selling. Three years old and upward. Purse $100 
—Sly 111 -pencer 2 to 1 won, Ben Ledi 110 second, Wyoming 109 
third. Good Hope, Socialist, Yaruba, Maud Ferguson, Rosalbra, 
Orion, lime 1:13V 

One mile. Turf Congress stake. Three years old and upward. 
Value $2345— Bannockbtiru 124 B illman 4 to 1 won, Gevser 121 sec- 
ond Zoroaster 116 third. Advance Guard. Yellowtail, OUnthus, 
Flower of Gold, Sardine, Bendorau. Time 1 :39. 

One mile. Selling. Three years < Id and upward Purse WO— 
Scotch Plaid 109 Spencer 9 to 10 won, Montallade H o second. Red 
Pirate 107 third. Antoiuetta, Grady, Espionage, Ping, Toribio. 
Time 1:41V 

Five furlot gs. Three years old and upward. Purse $400— Max" 
ello 112 Spencer 5 to 2 won. Gold Baron 112 second, C. H Harrison 
Jr. 112 third. Romany, Mafada, Lulu W., Lady Heloise. P. F. 
Time 1:02. 



Oakland Summaries 



(CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB MEETING.) 
MONDAY, JANUARY 22. 

Five furlongs. Selling. Three year olds. Purse $300— Saul of Tar- 
sus 111 (Spencer) 7 to 10 won, Carnlia 107 second, Gnndara 117 third. 
The Echo, Sisquoc, Invisible, Infinity, Bagdad, Fine Shot, Edgardo. 
Time 1 -.01%. 

Seven furlongs. Felling. Four year olds and upward. Purse $350 
—Tom Cromwell 112 (E.Jones) 3 to 2 won, Mike Rice 109 second, 
Faversham 109 third Slromo, O'Connor, 8t. Isadore, Inverary II. 
Time 1 :27%. 

One and one-sixteenth miles. Selling. Four year olds and up- 
ward. Purse $100— Merops 104 (Bullman) 7-to 1 won Scotch Plaid 109 
second. David Tenny 109 third. Dr. Marks. Tempo, Lady Britanlc, 
Satsuma, Weller. Time 1:46%, 

8even furlongs Follansbee Handicap. Three year olds and up- 
ward. Purse $1500- Yellowtail 123 (lenkins) 9 to 2 won. F W Brode 
112 second, Ventoro 128 third. Diomed, St. Cu'hbert, Dr. Sheppard, 
Conbtellator, Flamora, Bathos, Formero. Time 1:26. 

Six furlongs. Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse $400— 
Bessie Lee 107 (Bullman) 10 to 1 won, Lost Girl 109 second. Cormoraut 
109 third. Clarando, Meadowlark, Senator Dubois, New Moon, 
Twinkle Twink, Romany, Panamint. Time 1:14 

One mile. Four year olds and upward. Puree $400— The Fretter 
102 (J. Martin) 16 to 5 won, Headwater 99 second, Catasfophe 104 
third. Dr. Nembula, Red Pirate, Snips, Sister Alice. Time 1:39V 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 23. 

Five furlongs. Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse $350— 
Momentum 144 (Jenkins) ft to 1 won. Duke of York 141 second, Btron- 
goll 141 third. Storm King. Tammany, Almoner, Jael, Mainstay, 
Shellac, Greyhurst. Time 1:02. 

Futurity Course. Selling. Maiden three year olds. Purse $300— 
Redwald 110 (spencer) 11 to 5 won. J. V. Hayes 108 second. Coming 
Event 103 third Hipponax. Tom Sharkey, Caesar Young Miss Vera, 
Beautiful Bill, Sinooso, Leipzig, Bernadetto. Time 1:12%. 

Six furlongs Selling Four rear olds and upwards. Purse $400— 
Revanna 103 (lenkins) 5 to 2 won, liburon 102 second. Good Hope 98 
third. Pompiuo, Melkarlb. Poorlands, Brown Prince. Time 1:18%. 

Six furlones Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse $100— 
Gauntlet 104 (Bullman) 6 to 5 won, Montallade 109 second, Wbttcomb 
109 third Alicia, Terrene, Hohenlohe, Lost Girl, Dr. Marks, Ynle. 
Time 1:27%. 

One mile. Selling Three year olds and upward. Purse $400— 
Silver Tone 105 (Bullman) 5 to 1 won, Wyoming. 106 second, Toribio 
105 third. Merry Boy, Rr.cbel C., Horton, Don Luis Time 1:40V 

8lx rurlongs Selli' g. Four year olds and upwards. Purse $400— 
Sly 105 (Bullman) 8 to 5 won. Ahunadm 107 second. Snips 98 third. 
Harry Thoburn, High Hoe, Amasa. Time 1 :13. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28 

81 x furlongs. Selling. Four years old and upward. Purse $300— 
Pongo 113 (Piggott) 6 to 1 won, Vioris 104 second. Tim Toolln 112 
third. Alaska, Gold Baron. Munsey, Silver Maid, Delecta, Rufalba, 
Ramlet, Naples. Time 1:14^. 

Seven furlongs. Selling. Four years old and upward. Purse $400 

—Pat Morrissey 105 tBnilman) 3 to 5 won, Montanus 108 secoud. 
Croker 107 third. Owyhee, Billy McCloskey. Time 1:27V 

Five furlongs. 8elling. Three years old. Purse $'50— Almondral 
109 (Bullman) 3 to 1 won, Bagdad 111 second, Harry Thatcher 109 
third. St. Anthony. Matt Hogan. Frank Kuhry, Free Pass, Tomale, 
Invisible, Edgardo, Nettie Clark. Time 1:02%. 

One mile and an eighth. Selling. Four years old and upward. 
Purse $400— Rosluante 96 (Phelan)4 to 1 won, Potente 103 second, 
David Tenny 103 third. Formero, Casda.e, Grand Sachem. Time 

1:52. 

Futurity Course. Three years old. Purse $400— F. W. Brode 115 
(Bullman) 4 to 5 won, Alice Dougherty 107 secoud, Bee Bee 110 third. 
Silver Bullion, Zlska, Time 1:10. 

One mile. Selling. Four years old and upward. Purse $100— Del 
Psbo II. 121 (Spencer) 13 to 10 won, Tirade 119 second, Stuttgart 116 
third. Yaruba, Campus, Ladaea. Padre Jose. Inverary II., Be 
Happy, Tassajara, Wilmeter, Sylvan Lass. Time 1:41. 



DDntlfU'C Bronchial 
D till ft II O Troches 

(Made only by John I. Brown A Son, Boston.) 
give instant relief in 

Hoarseness 



January 27, 1900j 



57 




Fly-Fishing for Shad. 



The sbad has always been looked upon by nearly every 
devotee of the gentler craft as outside the pale of game fishes 
and quietly relegated to the tender mercies of the netters 
That there is no better food fisb, nor more toothsome pro- 
moter of brain power, none will deny. That tbey will 
readily rise to the fly and afford excellent sport, I am fully 
prepared to maintain, writes 6. f . Hammond in Out Door 
Sports. 

Nearly thirty years ago, while fishing for bass just below 
the dam at Greenville, a few miles above Noiwich, C >nn., 
I struck a fish, and after a few minutes exciting play I 
brought him to close quarters, and, slipping the net under 
him, secured my first shad taken with a fly. I was standing 
upon the apron below the dam, and as I was examining my 
prize, an old fisherman came out to me, and, although he 
bad seen the whole performance, he utterly refused to be- 
lieve that the fish had "bit," but insisted that I had "hooked 
him foul," and that I might try a hundred years and never 
get another one. I readily believed him, as the hook had 
entered from the outside, and bis theory, to say the least, 
was plausible; but, as if to convince us then and there, I 
had made but two or three casts and had drawn my flies 
nearly to my feet when, with a swift rush that carried him a 
foot out of the water and scattered the spray in our faces, a 
four-pounder seized the fly and was off like a shot. With 
trembling limb and unsteady hand I accepted the challenge, 
and recovering my self-possession ere be bad ceased his first 
frightened rush, I exerted all my skill, and after a long con- 
tested well fought struggle, my skeptical friend, with many 
ejaculations and exclamations, had him safe in the net. 
There was no getting around the fact that the book was fairly 
in his mouth; but still my friend was not convinced, and 
stoutly asserted that, although he had seen it, he did not be- 
lieve it, and so great an impression did the remarks of this 
veteran have upon me that I really thought that it was all 
an accident. 

Jt was several years before I again had an opportunity to 
tish in a favorable locality, and as I did not then succeed in 
capturing any, I was confirmed in mv belief, or, rather, the 
surject faded from my mind. It was again brought to my 
notice by reading in the papers that Mr. Thomas Chalmers 
was catching shad in the Connecticut river, at Holyoke > 
Mass., with a fly. Embracing the first opportunity, I took 
my fly-rod and went to Holyoke to investigate. I found 
Mr. Chalmers at home, just getting ready to go to the river. 
He gave me a cordial invitation to join him, which wa s 
eagerly accepted. We sorn arrived at the river bank, and 
seating ourselves in the boat pushed out into the stream 
and anchored in the quick water just at the head of a large 
pool wherein the sbad were wont to disport themselves. 
We could frequently see the flashing of their silvery sides a« 
they "broke" ail around us. I found Mr. Chalmers to be a 
quiet, unassuming gentlemen, and soon discovered that he 
was an expert and enthusiastic fisherman and a very agree 
able companion, ever ready to give all the information in 
his possession, and, with true sportsman's instinct, preferring 
that his companion should erjoy the sport, content to witness 
his triumph. At his suggestion I made up my cast with a 
small, light brown hackle for leader, a white miller for first 
dropper and a scarlet ibis for hand flv. Committing them to 
the bosom of the "yeasiy waters" and letting them float 
down the stream until I had reeled out some twenty-five 
or thirty yards of line, I calmly awaited events. Sitting 
here in the slanting beams of golden sunlight, and gently 
"rocked in the cradle of the deep," I dreamily surveyed my 
surroundings, and was greatly impressed with the rare 
beauty of the scene. The rippling waters went murmuring 
by, soothing the senses with their soft, sweet music. My 
eyes delightedly wandered over their undulating surface and 
restfullv gazed upon the dark green of the wooded banks be- 
yond. The subdued roar of the magnificent waterfall behind 
us, mingled with the drowsy hum of the spindle, was wafted 
to our ears by the gentle breeze. My delicious reverie was 
suddenly broken by an eager exclamation from my com- 
panion. I did not need to hear the music of the humming 
reel, nor see the swaying of the pliant rod, to know that he 
was revelling in the delights of the angler's elysium. A 
glance at his speaking countenance told well its tale of bliss- 
ful ioy. The wonderful light in his eves revealed a wealth 
of happiness that only comes when eager rise is followed by 
successful strike. With absorbing interest I watched each 
phase of the well contested fight. The gallant rush and 
powerful leap of the maddened fish made me tremble for his 
safety; but I soon found that there was no cause for fear. 
Each lightning rush was eently humored; each brave leap 
was deftlv managed, and after a most exciting struggle I saw 
th» beautiful purple and silver side of the gamy fellow glisten 
in the sun, and, slipping the landing net under him, I drew 
him into the boat — a handsome five-pound fisb. Our lines 
were soon out again, and in a few moments there came a 



soul-inspiring tug at my line, and I was fast to a heavy fish. 
I will not weary the reader with a recapitulation of the oft 
told tale. Suffice it to say that in a few brief, happy 
moments a magnificent mate was lying by the side of our 
first captive. So fascinating was the sport that not until the 
stars came out did we reel up our lines and take our de- 
parture with seven noble fish in our creels, and unspeakable 
happiness in our hearts. 

Many times since then have I cast my flies upon these 
pleasant waters, and many beautiful captives have graced my 
creel. While fishing with Mr. Chalmers one day be hooked 
three fish at one cast, and by great good fortune I succeeded 
in landing them all — a grand trio of thirteen and one-half 
pounds. Two years ago I also caught three at once, but 
they were not more than half so heavy. For the past 
few years so many have joined in the sport that there is 
scarcely an afternoon that you cannot see from a dozen to 
fifty, and on favorable days even a larger namber of fisher- 
men, eagerly engaged in the pleasunt pastime. One evening 
I counted upward of a hundred fish that I saw captured, and 
presume that there were many more that escaped mv notice 
Nearly all of the anglers use a hajd line; but, although 
they occaesionally land their fisb, tbey lose more than they 
save. This method is not nearly so billing, nor does it af- 
ford a tithe of the sport that is vouchsafed to those who 
wield a light, springy rod. Many fish are taken in the 
rapids helow. 

There is also a good bit of water helow the railroad bridge 
at Williamansett. I have had capital sport here just oppo- 
site a large pine that stands at the edge of the high bank 
upon the east shore, and leans over the water at an angle of 
forty-five degrees. Anchoring my boat about one-third of 
the distance across, and using not more than eight or nine 
feet cf line, 1 have by careful whipping obtained many a 
lovely rise and secured many a noble fish. 

Should any of my readers wish to "try their luck," Mav 
is the accepted time. Fish are plentv, and readily rise to 
the lure; the water is just right and roval sport awaits you. 
Take your lightest rod and a good assortment of trout flies 
and go to Holyoke; try and secure the services of a boatman 
who is an adept, and my word for it, should good fortune 
attend you, you will ever bless the day that ycu cast your 
line upon the bright waters of our beautiful river, and won 
from its depths its most precious treasure — i full-grown 
well-fed sbad. 



The steelhead anglers have not met with much encourage- 
ment in their efforts to lure the gamey fish from stream or 
tidewater the past few days. John Gallegher caught a dozen 
or two small fisb, none of tberu over a pound in weight, near 
Point Reyes on Wednesday. Dynamite and spearing by the 
natives is now showing results that are acknowledged rue- 
fully by the fishermen. 

Russian river last week promised to yield angling sport 
somewhat similar to the season enjoyed two years ago. Satur- 
day last quite a partv of rod weilders "gathered at the river," 
among them were John Lemmer, Alex T. Vogelsang, Fred 
Johnson, Wm. Swain, John Butler, Col. Keliehor, Manuel 
Cross, Al Wilson, John Siebe> Jr., and others. Three day's 
fishing up and down a large extent of the river from Dun- 
can's failed to reward efforts with bait or spoon. The water 
was in eltgant condition, but high — the remotest tributaries 
of the river were also full. The fish had evidently passed 
up to spawn there being no obstacles anywhere to impede 
their progress and cause them to remain in the pools below 
the bars and riHles. Near Mark West Springs, but a few 
miles from Santa Rosa, on one of the tributary streams, a 
number of spawning fish are reported to haye been speared. 

A few nice steelhead have been ought at the dam above 
Napa, which is at the head of tide-water in the creek. 

The Santa Catalina Island Tuna club's second annual 
tournament will open May 1st and close August 15th. The 
following trophies are on the list: Tuna Club cup, held by 
C. F. Holder, 1898, 184 pound fish, and at present held by 
Col C. P. Morehouse. 251-pound fish; the Tufts- Lyon black 
sea-bass cup, held in 1898 by F. V. Rider, 327-pound fish, 
and in 1899 by P. 8. Manning,, 330-pound fisb; the Van 
Nuys cup, for largest yellew-tail, F. V. Rider's at present; 
the Tuna club gold medal, for heaviest tuna, C. F. Holder's 
in 1898, 183-pound fish, and Col. C. P. Morehouse's at pres- 
ent, 261-pound fhb; tbe Rider- Mncomber medal, for largest 
black sea-bass, F. V. Rider's in 1898, 327 -pound fish, and 
now in possession of T. 8. Manning, 330-pound fisb; the 
John F. Francis medal, for largest yellowtail of season, held 
by F. 8. Garrish. In addition to tbe above will be given 
a number of beautiful prizes consisting of magnificent iods, 
reels, gaffs, etc., all offered to induce anglers from everywhere 
to fish scientifically with rod and reel. 



Black bass are reported to be increasing plentifully in the 
waters of the state whpre they have been planted. 



Tbe Alameda marshes from 8an Leandro Bav to Mowry's 
Landing and also the marsh land in the vicinity of the 
Bridges and Alviso have been the favorite resort of a large 
number of hunters since the present shooting season opened. 
The duck shooting has been unusually good this year in 
those sections, many fine bags having been made. Last Sat- 
urday it is estimated that at least three hundred ardent 
shooters accompanied by half that number of dogs were on 
the narrow guage train bound for different stations adjacent 
to the land of tortuous creeks and the winding sloughs bor- 
dered by sedgy marshes. Two cars, every seat occupied by a 
knight of the shot gun, were sidetracked at the Bridges, 
whilst the hunters npade themselves comfortable waiting for 
daylight and ducks. During pleasant weather t e birds stay 
out in the bav, giving tbe hunter but few chances in the 
marshes or creeks for a shot. When weather conditions and 
tides are favorable and the birds are flying, the best locations 
for a shoot are on the bay shore. Here the hunter erects 
his blind and puts out decoys, the skirmish line further in- 
land keeping the birds constantly on the wing. Sculling 
the creeks near the Bhore has been found productive of plen- 
tifol sport and a fat bag of ducks. Frank Gassoway bagged 
twenty seven ducks in the sloughs near Alviso on Saturday 
last, most of them canvasback and bluebill. W. N. Wet- 
more and A. Russell Crowell, a well known sporting writer 
now identified with large copper mining interests in this 
state, a week ago spent two days shore shooting at a point 
some eight miles away from tbe Pastime Club bouse and 
bagged nearly one hundred ducks, most of them being can- 
vasbacks in first class condition. These latter delicious 
birds are now more in evidence in the east bay shore marshes 
than they have been for years past. 




A Repeating Shot Gun Test Case. 



The powers of a board of supervisors in tbe adoption and 
enforcement of laws for the protection of fish and game, in 
their respective counties, as provided by the State law, was 
to have been passed upon by Jud e Angel lot ti in the Superior 
Coort at San Rafael, Marin county, yesterday. In a recent 
game ordinance adopted by the supervisors of the above 
named county there is embodied a clause prohibiting the use 
of magazine repeating shot guns. This prohibition was 
brought about in the interest of protecting the game birds, 
particularly quail, in Marin county. It having been demon- 
3tiated in the past that repeating shot guns were largely in- 
strumental in tbe rapid decrease of quail and other birds in 
the hunting districts of that county. Recently W. A. 
Marshall was arrested and fined by a Justice of the Peace for 
using a repeating shotgun contrary to the provisions of the 
ordinance then in force. Marshall refused to pay the fine 
and surrendered himself to the Sheriff, the alternative being 
ten day's imprisonment. His attorney immediately peti- 
tioned for a writ of habeas corpus alleging in the petition 
that the defendant Marshall was shooting on his own land 
and taking the position that the county ordinance is un- 
reasonable, discriminating and void, and that it is not within 
the power of the supervisors to make the use of a repeating 
shot gun a misdemeanor. 

This case has been watched with considerable interest by a 
large number of sportsmen, the majority of whom are de- 
cidedly averse to the use of these guns, realizing their dan- 
gerous possibilities in reducing stiU further the limited 
amount of game in districts where formerly quail and other 
game abounded in plentiful numbers. 

The provision of the 8tate law restricting the use of guns 
larger than a ten bore in the pursuit of game has stood the 
test of the courts, the Marin county law is directly in line 
with the State law and enacted for the same purpose: the 
protection of game against the rapacity of heedless hunters. 
It teems that the contention of the defense in the above case 
is hardly a tenable one. The manufacture of repeating guns 
is carried on by a number of firms and so is the manufacture 
of guns larger than ten guages, where the showing of discri- 
mination comes in it is difficult to surmise. 



CARTRIDGE AND SHELL. 



The California Wing Club will open their live bird season 
on Sunday, March 4th. 

Sea lions are reported to be congregating in great nutn- 
bers about the cliffs and rocks at the extreme end of Point 
Reyes. 

A blue rock tournament will be held at Hueoeme, Ven- 
tura county, on February 21 — 22, under the auspices of the 
Hueneme Gun Club. 

The trap season this year promises to be a record one. 
Tbe local gun clubs are arranging attractive programs. 
Indications from all points on the Coast are that the blue 
rock enthusiasts will follow out the bent of their sporting 
inclinations to the extreme. A sure sign of the growth of 
the sport is that many new faces will be seen at the shooting 
scores. 

The Southern California division of tbe Cooper Ornitho- 
logical Club met in annual se>sion at Pasadena on December 
28tb, and elected the following officers: President, A. I. 
McCormiek, Los Angeles; Vice-President, F. S. Daggett, 
Pasadena; Secretary, Howard Robertson; Treasurer, H. 8. 
Swarth, Los Angeles. The object of this organization is the 
study of birds and bird life. Interesting papers along this 
line were read by several members. 

Two remarkably beautiful hybrid specimens were recently 
obtained by W. 8 Kittle during one of his regular tours 
through the markets. Both birds were drakes, one being a 
cross of the widgeon and mallard, the other was a combina- 
tion of sprig and teal. Each bird showed tbe plumage and 
markings of its dual breeding in a strong and vivid manner. 
The ducks have both been nicely mounted and now are part 
of a collection that has been long a favorite indulgence of 
Mr. Kittle's. 

English snipe have not been as numerous this season on 
the snipe grounds hunted over by local sportsmen as were 
noticed in several past years. One reason for this is, that 
the snipe grounds are being gradually taken up for cultiva- 
tion purposes, etc., driving the birds away to new feeding 
spots. Several of our veteran snipe shooters are loud in the 
praises of the sport afforded near Livermore and Pleasanton 
in bvgone days and bewail the fact that such chances for 
bagging the long-bills will not again be found within many, 
many miles of San Francisco. 



At the Traps. 



The largest gathering of trap-shooters to date in Santa 
Barbara assembled on the grounds of the Mission Gun Club 
last Sunday, the 21st inst. Shooters from Ventura and 
Oxnard vied with the local cracks in the series of seven races 
on the card. The scores all round were above the average 
heretofore shown by tbe Southern sportsmen. Tbe shooting 
of W. H Seaver of this cit», a visitor at the meeting, was 
somewhat phenomenal in its nature, as will be seen by read- 
ing the scores made during tbe day. F'om race to race he 
made a straight run of ninety-nine and dusted tbe one hun- 
dredth target, then he broke clean to tbe 125th saucer. 
After the first miss he broke eighty-one birds straight, dusting 
the eight.v-s»cond. The record for the day was but five lost 
out of 180 shot at. 

Trap shooting promises to have quite a boom in Santa 
Barbara this season. The dean of the shooters in that town 



58 



January 27, 1900 



being the veteran sportsman, C. A. Loud, 

to Mr. Henry 8. Bbort, the President of 
C ub, for the fcllowing scores: 

Targela 10 10 20 20 20 20 

Beaver 10 10 20 20 20 19 

W lllnrns 6 7 lb 1" 15 lfi 

c-ooey 10 » l" IS 17 17 

8„, n 8 10 16 17 18 17 

J am^s i ' 7 9 13 11 — 

Waiters 7 5 11 12 14 15 

Henry 9 8 16 17 - - 

Piaiz 7 7 18 12 16 - 

St. John 4 7 U 14 — — 

Ooumsa 8 9 14 15 13 11 

Fesler 8 6 16 16 18 16 

Wolf « 6 10 13 14 15 

Wells 4 8 8 11 9 14 

Kenny 8 4 — — — — 

Qulntero 8 6 10 14 13 15 

Thompson 8 9 16 17 14 13 

Jackson 4 6 11 — — — 

Fuller - 8 7 16 14 16 — 



We are indebted 
the Mission Gun 



Shot at Scored 



125 
100 
125 
125 
80 
100 
60 
80 
60 
100 
100 
100 
100 
20 
125 
125 
40 
80 



124 

79 
109 
109 

60 

64 

49 

69 

37 

70 

80 

648] 

49^ 
7a 

79 i 

96 

21 

60 



The Game Law. 



The synopsis of the game laws appearing below and pub- 
lished in the Breeder and Sportsman for several years 
past has, from time to time been changed or the provisions 
of new ordinances added thereto by reason of the many and 
various changes in the county game and fish laws, particu 
larly those of recent date and of application in and around 
the bay counties. 

This synopsis has been frequently copied (in more or less 
garbled and incomplete form) and quoted by city and interior 
j ournals and has also been printed and distributed by busi- 
ness houses. While the information given at the date of is- 
suance was substantially correct, we do not care to be held 
responsible for the circulation of old matter that is now in- 
correct in many details. Some complaint has been made in 
this respect and to avoid misunderstanding in the future it is 
suggested that for information of this character a reference 
be mide to current numbers of the Brredbr and Spokts 
man for the latest and most complete data coneerning the 
Game Laws. 

The county enactments relative to the shipment of game 
have become inoperative under the decision of the Supreme 
Court of California, rendered December 5, 1899, in the case 
of James Knapp on habeas corpus, appealed from the 
Superior Court of Stanislaus county. 

The open season for shooting quail, doves, deer and wild duck as 
fixed oy the State law is as follows: Doves, ISth July to 15th Febru- 
ary. Mountain quail and grouse, 1st September to 15th February. 
Valley quail, wild duck and rail. 1st October to 1st March. Male deer, 
15th July to 15th October. Pheasants, the taking, killing, selling or 
having in possession at any time is prohibited; robbing or destruc- 
tion of nests or haying pheasant eggs in possession is a misdemeanor 
in the following counties: Butte. Trinity, Marin, Lake, Merced- 
Riverside, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, Rings, Ven, 
tura, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Joaquin, Yuba. 

The clerks of nearly all the Boards of Suoervlsors have advised us 
no changes have been made this year, but the ordinances passed 
last year hold good if they do not conflict with the State law. The 
following counties nave not passed any ordinances that alter 
the open Beason as provided by State law : Amador. Butte, Inyo, 
Modoc. Mono, Mendocino, Mariposa, Nevada, Napa, Plumas, 
San Diego, Solano, Siskiyou, Tehama, and Yolo. 

The changes are as follows : 

Alpine— Deer. Sept. 2 to Oct. 15. 

Alameda— Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 1. Male deer. July 15 to Oct. 1. 
Pheasants protected until February, 1904. Hunting, killing or hav- 
ing in possession for purpose of sale or shipment out of county, 
quail, bob white, partridge, wild duck, rail, mountain quail, grouse, 
dove, does or deer, antelope, elk or mountain sheep prohibited. 

Colusa— Deer, Ang. 15 to Oct. 15. 

Calaveras— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Contra Costa— Deer, July 20 to Sept. 2. (Use of dogs prohibited). 

El Dorado— Doves, July 20 to Feb. 1. Trout, June 1 to Dec. 1. 

Fresno— Valley quail. Nov. 1 to Jan. 31. Individual ba« limited to 
25 quail per day. Mountain quail, Sept. 1 to Feb. 15. Doves, Aug. 15 
to Feb Id. Pheasants, bob whltw quail and prairie chickens, close 
season iu for e for an indefinite p< riod. Use of nets or seines in 
county watersjprohibited. Shipment of game from county prohibited. 

Glenn— Deer, venison, dried veuison, oeer skin, buck, doe or fawn; 
quail, grouse, pheasant, dove, plover, snipe or wild duck, shipping or 
taking out of the county prohibited 25 birds per year individual 
limit to be taken from the county upon licensed permission. 

Humboldt — urouse and Wilson snipe, sept. 1 to FeD. 1». Rilling of 
waterfowl prohibited between one-half hour after aunset and one 
half hour before Bunrise. Pheasants and wild turkeys protected 
un-.ilOct. 1, 1900. Black brant, Oct. 1 to March 1. Shipment of game 
out of the county prohibited. Deer, use of dogs prohibited. Striped 
bass— Close Beason until Jan. 1, 1905 

Rem— Snipping game out of the county prohibited. Quail, Oct. 1 
to Feb. 1 Bronze Ibis or curlew— Robbing or destroyiug nests or 
taking eggs, prohibited. 

Rings— Doves, Sept. 1 to Feb. 15. Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 15. 

Lake— Deer, Aug. 1 to Oct. 1. 

Los Angeles— Male deer, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. Valley quail, bob 
white or mountain quail, Dec 1 to Jan. 1. Doves, July 15 to Oct. 1. 
Shooting for sale, or shipment of quail, bob white, partridges, pheas- 
ants, grouse, doves, ducks, rails or other game protected by statute, 
prohibited. Ducks, individual bag limited to 25 biros per day. 
Shipping game to marseia outalde of lht- conutv prohibited. Sea- 
gulls, exrets, pelicans, Beals, protected. Trout season opens April 1 st. 

Marin— Deer, July 16 to Sept. 15. Quail, partridge or gronse, Oct. 15 
toJan.15 Individual bag limited to 25 birds per day. Markethuntiug 
and sbipment of game from the county is prohibited. Use of 
Repeating shot guns prohibited. Killing of meadow larks or 
any other song birds prohibited. Hunting within private enclosures 
or on public roads prohibited. Trout, with book and line only, Apri 1 
to Oct. 15. 

Madera— Market hunting prohibited. 

Monterey— Deer, July 15th to Sept. 1st. (Use of dogs prohibited). 
Quail. Oct. 1 to Feb. 1. Shipping or taking game out of the county 
prohibited. 

Napa— Trout, by hook and line only, April 1 to Dec. 1. 

Orange— Doves, Aug. l to Feb. L Deer, Aug. U to Oct. L (Market 
hnnting prohibited). Quail, partridges or grouse, Oct. 1 to Oct. 5. 
Ducks, Nov. 1 to March 1. Ducks and quail, shipment from the 
county restricted as follows: No person shall ship ducks or quail 
out of the county in quantities to exceed two dozen birds a week. 
Market hunting prohibited. 
^ Placer— Trout, lune 1 to Dec. 1. 

Plumas— Salmon, trout, May 1 to Dec. 1 (netting prohibited.) 

Riverside— Male deer, close season until July 15, 1901. July 15 to 
Sept. 15, thereaiter. Quail, Individual bag limited to 20 bl.ds per 
day. Mountain or valley quail, pheasant and wild duck, sale of pro- 
hibited in the county. Wild duck, valley or mountain quail, ship- 
ment from county prohibited. Trout, any variety, close season until 
May 1, 1901. May 1 to Dec. 1, thereafter. 

Sacramento-Quail, ducks, doves, pheasants; shooting for Bale and 
market out of county prohibited. Taking or shipping out of county 
of more than ten birds In one day by any person prohibited 

San Benito— Deer, Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. Market hunting and ship- 
ment of game out of county pronlbited Quail, partridge or grouse, 
Oct. 15 to Feb. 1. Individual bag limited to 30 birds per day. 
Mountain quail, perpetual close season. Trout, April 1 to Oct 15. 

San Bernardino— Deer, July 15 to Sept 15;(close season continuous. 
1899.) Valley or mountain quail, wild duck, sale of and shipment 
out of county prohibited. Trout, catching or aaie of, between April 
1st aud May 1st of any year and during 1899, prohibited. Iree 
squirrels, five per day the lndivldua limit 

San Diego— Shippi >k game out of the county prohibited. 

San J. aquln— Shipping or taking game out of the county pro- 
hibited. Shooting on public read prohibited. 

San Luis oblBpo— Deer, July 15 to Sept. 1. Use of houndB prohib- 
ited Doves, July 15 to Dec. 1. Hunting for market' situated nntslde 
of the county prohibited. Clams, use of plows or machines in digging 
prohibited. Sbipment of abaloues out of the county prohibited. 

San Mateo— Deer, Aug. 1 to Sept. Is. (Use of dogs not prohibited. 
Market hunting prohibited). Rail. Oct. 1 5 to Nov 1. (Shooting from 
boat at high tide prohibited). Quail, Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. 



Santa Barbara— Deer, Aug. 1 to Aug. 22. Use of hounds pro- 
hibited. Quail, Nov. 1 to March 1. Dove*, Aug. 15 to Feb. 15. 
Market hunting and sale of game In the county pronlbited. Lobsters 
or crawfish, close season, April 15 to Aug. 15, snipping from county 
in close season prohibited. Abalones, taking, selling, having in 
possession aud shipping from the county prohibited. Clams can not 
be dug till July. 1902 

Santa Clara— Male deer, July 15 to Oct. 15. Valley or mountain 
quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 1. Individual bag limited to 20 birds per day, 
Quail, pheasants and doves, purchase and sale, or shipment out of, 
or into the county prohibited. Wild duck, purchase and sale, or 
shipment out of county of ducks killed in the couuty prohibited. (In 
force Nov 9). 

Santa Cruz— Shipping game from the county prohibited 
Shasta— Deer, July la to Sept. l. Shipment of feathered game out 
of the couuty prohibited. 
Sierra— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Siskiyou— Shipment of feathered game out of the county prohibited. 

Sonoma— Deer. July 15 to Oct. 1. Quail, Nov. 1. to Feb. 1 Pheas- 
ants, close season till Jan 1, 1901. Shipping game out of the county, 
hunting within private enclosures, prohibited. Use of nets in streams 
ot the county prohibited. 

Stanislaus— Wild ducks, dove, quail or snipe, sbipment from the 
county prohibited. 

Sutter— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. Doves, July 15 to Jan. 1. 

Trinity— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Tulare— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oot. 15. Shipping game ont ol the county 
prohibited. 

Ventura— Quail, any variety. Oct 1 to Nov. 1. Hunting for sale 
or market of quail, grouse, dove, wild duck, deer or mountain sheep 
prohibited, except between Oct. 10th aud 15th. 

Yuba— Shipping ducks and quail from the county to market pro- 
hibited. 




Coming Events. 



BENCH SHOWS. 

Feb. 20— 23— Westminster Rennel Club. 24th annual show. New 
York. James Mortimer, sup't. 

FIELD TRIALS. 

Rentucky Field Trial Association. Inaugural trials 

Ry. H. D. Newcomb. see'y. 

South Caroliua Game Protective and Field Trial Associa- 
tion. Inauguial trials S. C. W. G. Jeffords, sec'y. 

Jan. 22, 1900— United States Field Trials Club. West Point, Miss. 
W. B Stafford, sec'y. 

Champion Field Trials Association's annual trials. Wes 

Point, Miss. (Following U. 8. Trials). W. B. Stafford, sec'y. 

Jan 22, 1900— PacitJc toast Field Trials. 17th annual trials. 
Bakersfield. J. E. de Ruvter, sec'y. 

Feb. 5. 1900-Alabama Field Trials Club. 4th annual trials. Green- 
ville T. H. 8pencer. sec'y. 

Feb. — , 19i 0— Texas I- ield Trial Club. 4th annual trials. 

Tex, G. A. Chabot, sec'y-treas 



Pacific Coast Field Trials. 



The seventeenth annual field trials ot the Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club were started on Monday morning under 
very pleasant auspices, and with a good representative attend' 
ance of Bportsmen. 

The annual meeting of the club was held at 8:30 P. M , 
Wednesday, at the Southern Hotel, and thefol'owing officerg 
were elected: President, W. S. Tevis; First Vice-Pre-ident, 
J. E. Terry; 8econd Vice-President, W. W. Van Arsdale; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Albert Belz; Board of Directors — the 
above officers and C. N. Post, J. M. Kilgarif, C. E. Worden, 
J, H. Schumacher and H. J. Keller. Thomas Johnson, the 
acting judge, was elected an honorary member of the club. 

The Derby was followed by the All- Vged Stake, commenc. 
ing on Wednesday morning, particulars of which were re- 
ceived too late for this issue. The original entries in this 
stake were twelve in number, ten of these started with an ad- 
ditional Derby winner, Cuba's Z*p, entered. Peach Nugge 
and Verona California did not start. 

The Derby winner Heu Crocker's Chief, is a handsome and 
stylish black, white and tan setter dig by Iroquois Chief out 
of Mary Lou. Chief was whelpsd November 18, 1898, he 
his an An.onio head with a body and tail-carriage strongly 
suggestive of the noted Ben Hill. He showed much intelli- 
gence and al'O good ranging and speed characteristics in 
working his ground, and should, with a little more exper- 
ience, make a strong bid for All- Age honors next year. 

The history of Chief's appearance in a field trial is rather 
an interesting one. S. Christensen, the owner of Mary Lou. 
his dam, desired to prove his belief that a nick between the 
Ben Hill and Antonio strains would develop a dog having 
the best characteristics of the blood of both— a theory that 
has been much thought of by English breeders and also by 
some of the best in this country. Lou was accordingly bred 
to Verona Kennels' Iroqioia Chief. When the litter was 
whelped, Mr. Christensen selected one puppy (since dead) 
for himself and set aside the other for Walter 8. Hobart_ 
E-q , firmly believing that after the dog was raised and 
properly trained, he would prove of such strong character 
and style as to induce Mr. Hobart to take an active interes t 
in field trial affairs — which secondary theory has also had an 
agreeable result founded on enthusiasm and faith. 

The young dog was turned over to W. B. Coutts and his 
education commenced. He was entered in the 1900 Derby 
and worked with the Coutts' string of dogs near Bakersfield 
prior to the trials. His trainer whilst praising his many 
good qualities was not over sanguine that he had a winner in 
hi» charge. The result proved that ''blood will tell." 

Mr. Hobart, when the dog was first entered, expressed his in. 
tention of presenting him to bis friend Henry J. Crocker, Esq . 
He has or ered a handsome silver collar properly inscribed 
and will turn Chief over to his new master. It is more than 
probable now that field trials will in the future have more 
ban passing interest to both of the gentlemen named, 



Iroquois Chief is by Antonio out of Can Can — Mary Lou 
is by Bombay oat of Pxciola, the dam of Joe Cummiogs.' 
Bombay, a dog Mr. Christensen owned in WashingloiTand 
who has left a strong breeding influence in the setter circles 
of the North, was sired by Champion Chance out of Nellie. 
Picciola is by Ben Hill out of Bonseiene, a Gladstone bitch 
who was said to have been the handsomest bitch of her 
time in the United States. 

Woodcraft, winner of second honors in the Derby, is a 
stylish worker of great promise. 

Cuba's Zap is a dog of remarkable speed and for a puppy 
does excellent work, although he seemed to be sadly off in 
nose during the two-day's running. He ranges well and 
ehows considerable judgment for a puppy one year old. 

THE DEBBY . 

The trials commenced with the Derby, the Members' Stake 
was originally scheduled as the initial event, but owing to 
the non-arrival of several of the club members who were 
expected to enter their dogs it was deemed expedient to 
commence with the Derby on Monday and postpone the 
running of the Members' Slake until Thursday. The draw- 
ing for the Derby took place at 9 o'clock a. m., by reason of 
the unavoidably late arrival of Judge Johnson. The start 
for the trial grounds, located on W. 8. Tevis' Stockdale 
Ranch near Bakersfield, being made at midday. 

Birds were found to be plentiful and cover sufficient for 
the sport. The weather which had been foggy for days 
previous was bright and prospects go d for continued sun- 
shine. There was fourteen starters out of thirty-one original 
entries: 

Schley-Ella C — This pair were the first put down, the 
Stockdale Kennel pointer Schley being handled by Fred 
Coutts and J. E. Lucas handling his pointer Ella C. Oa 
the cast off the course led up a drv creek bed half a mile 
before birds were found in the shape of a scattered bevy, 
most of them being sprinters, very little work was shown by 
the dogs, who seemed to be somewhat listless, owing probably 
to the heat, as at this hour the weather was very warm. The 
dogs were taken up at 1:33 P. m. 

8ilver Star-Negro Joe— Dr. C. E. Wilson's setter Silver 
Star handled by himself and N. H. Hickman's pointer Negro 
Joe handled by W. B. Coutts were next put down. The thick 
cover appeared to be an unaccustomed experience for this 
brace. The opportunities for showing speed and range equal- 
ities were limited, although Negro Joe showed to best advan. 
tage. Both dogs seemed to be bothered by the spectators 
and came in to the handlers frequently. This pair was taken 
up at 2:22 p. m. 

Cuba's Zep-Lorenzo — The third heat was between Stock- 
dale Kennels' pointer Cuba's Z -p, handled by R. M. Dodge 
and Qardiner and Betten's setter Lorenzo handled by Henry 
Betten. The dogs worked partly on open ground and also 
along the timber edge, making a better showing of speed and 
range than was seen in the previous heats. Birds were soon 
found and Zep, who was steady to wing, scored a point. 
Immediately afterwards Lorenzo scored a staunch point and 
was steady to wing and shot. Z-p made the third point, 
after this the quail were lost and the chances for scoring 
were minimized. This brace developed some of the neatest 
work of the day. They were taken up at 2:53 P. M. 

Dixie Q ieen-Hea Crocker's Chief — At three o'clock the 
fourth brace, W. S. Hobarl's setter dog Hen Crocker's Chief, 
handL-d by Coutts, and Dr. Wilson's setter bitch Dixie Qieen, 
handled by the Elko sportsman himself were cast off in an 
open field, both showing plenty of style, speed and tanging 
qualities, especially the Chief who went wide and fast work- 
ing his ground excellently. Far and away they went 'or 
possibly half a mile, Chief finally making a bevy point in a 
corn field holding staunchly until the birds flushed. After 
the flush neither dog was successful in locating a single 
bird; when, after the longest heat of the day they were 
ordered up at 3:45 P. M. 

Woodcraft-Bianco —The next pair put down were two 
eetter dogs; Qardiner and Betten's Woodcraft, Betten handler, 
and H. H. Kerckhoff's Blanco, Coutt's having the Los 
Angeles 'og in charge. The cast off was made on open 
ground vhich, after working for a time, proved barren of 
birds, the brace was then sent back to the timber where a 
small bevy had been marked down but was flashed by the 
spectators. Woodcraft quickly came to a point on a single 
bird which he located, the bird flushed, however, before hie 
handler came up. He shortly followed with a second point, 
the bird again flushing, showing steady to wing at both times 
both dogs showing good breaking and excellent manners. 
Blanco made the next point and dropped to wing nicely a 
showing good stvle and docility. At 4:40 the dogs were 
taken up. 

C. Young's Duke, Coutt's handler, and Gardiner and Bet- 
ten's Bonnie Gem should have run the next heat, but as 
Bonnie Gem was not on the grounds, the next pair were 
called. Why the usual rule disqualifying the non-appearing 
dog was not enforced is not known at this writing. 

Plutc-Pride of Ross — The brace next in order were Stock- 
dale Kennels' black setter dog Pluto, Dodge handler, and W. 
8. Davis' setter dog Pride of Ross The youngsters developed 
a degree of friskioess on their debut that tried the patience 
of the handlers Both showed an eagerness in their work 
that caused several flushes which should have been pointed. 
The heat was a short one, the pair being ordered up at 
4:45 p. m., which closed the work for the day. 



January 27, 1900] 



5i 



Tuesday morning, the second day of the trials, opened up 
contrary to expectations, cold and fogey, the weather con- 
tinuing disagreeable throughout the day. A start was made 
from the trial grounds at 7 a M. 

Bonnie Gem-Duke— The first pair down was Gardiner and 
Betten's setter bitch Bonnie Gem, handled by Betten and C. 
Young's setter dog Duke, Coutts handler. The brace were 
cast cfl at 8:30 A. M., a bevy of birds being found in a heavy 
growth of brush surrounded by open fields on the Stockdale 
ranch near Mr. Tevis' home. Neither dog showed to advan- 
tage, Duke making one rather unsteady point, while both 
dogs made several flushes. They were shortly ordered up, 
this being the concluding heat of the first series. 

SECOND SERIES. 

The difference in weather conditions between the two days 
was such as to leave much to be deeired in determining the 
qualities of the dogs, in consequence, Judge Johnson con- 
cluded to run all the dogs over again, placing the whole lot 
in the second series. 

Silver Star-Ella E.— The first brace cast off were Dr. Wil- 
son's Silver Star and John E. Lucas' Ella E. Both dogs 
seemed to be somewhat off in nose, no particular work being 
shown until near the close of the heat, when Ella E. brought 
up on a very stylish and steady point. A small bevy was 
flushed by the handlers and the dogs were then ordered back 
to the wagon. 

Negro Joe-Lorenzo— N. H. Hickman's Negro Joe and 
Gardiner and Betten's Lorenzo were next put down on the 
same ground. Both showed good ranging qualities, but 
little pointing was done. The dogs were ordered up in 
thirty minutes, Joe coming to point in the high weeds befor e 
reaching his handler; the point being made after time wa g 
called, was not allowed. 

Cuba's Zep-Hen Crocker's Chief. The third pair cast off. 
8tockdale Kennels' Cuba's Zap and W. 8. Hobart's Hen 
Crocker'l Chief, started on open ground, working across a 
road into an orchard, where a fine bevy of birds was dis. 
cover, d. This is a splendid brace of dogs and should be 
he(.rd from again in future trials. Some of the neatest work 
shown during the day was developed. The birds were fol- 
lowed across a ditch into a nursery, into which neither judge 
nor handlers could go, each dog making several good points 
in that cover. The dogs were then brought back to open 
ground and performed excellently well in an adj»centvin- 
yard. Tne pair were taken up after being down just thirty- 
eight minutes. 

Dixie Queen-Bianco— Dr. Wilson's Dixie Queen and H. 
H. Kerchoff's Blanco were the next pair put down. They 
started off in the vineyard showing speed and style and 
worked through into the orchard where the birds had been 
first discovered, Dixie Queen making a steady point on a 
pair of birds lying close together. 

Pride of Ross— Woodcraft— Gardiner & Betten's Wood- 
craft and W. 8. Davis' Pride of Ross were next put down but 
ran a short and rather unsatisfactory heat, as but few birds 
were found. Ross, however, achieved the distinction of 
pointing a Mongolian pheasant, a number of which have 
been turned out by Mr. Tevis of the Stockdale Ranch. 

An opportune bait for luncheon was then called after 
which a beat was made through the 8tockdale grounds by a 
number of men, a large bevy of bevy of birds being driven 
out to aod scattered in the nearby open fields and garden a 
short distance from the house. 

Pluto-Bonnie Gen — The first brace put down in the after- 
noon was Stockdale Kennels' Pluto and Gardiner and 
Betten's Bonnie Gem. This hea' did not develop much 
point work on single birds, Gem making a stylish point 
which Pluto passed unnoticed. 

8chley-Duke — The final heat of the second series occu- 
pied but ten minutes and was between Stockdale Kennels' 
8chley and C. Young's Duke. 

THIRD SERIES. 

Negro Joe-Cuba's Zep — The only pair put down in this 
series weie N. H. Hickman's Negro Joe and 8tockdale Ken- 
nels' Cuba's Z*p, both pointers. Each dog ranged well and 
had plenty of »peed, but was apparently unaccustomed to 
huDtirjg in the open, and flushed birds constantly which should 
have been pointed. Z.-p's work was not equal to tbat of 
Monday or of the work done in the morning heat. Each 
pointed several times on rabbits, but Zep made a stanch point 
on birds just before they were sent back to the wagons. 

FINAL. 

Judge Johnson called for Hobart's Hen Crocker's Chief 
and Gardiner & Betten's Woodcraft. Not until tbat time 
did the spectators get a line on what his decision might be 
but it was evident from the way he paired off the dogs tbat 
Chief and Woodcraft would run for first and secood place. 
The ground selected for the last heat was in the open Gelds, 
near where the first brace had been put down in the 
morning, and it was not long until birds were located. Each 
of the puppies did very creditable work. They were down 
less than a half hour when the judge called them up, thus 
ending the heat and the Derbv. His decision was as follows: 
Hen Crocker's Chief, first; Woodcraft, second; Cuba's Zep 
third. 

SUMMARY. 

Bakebsfield, Cal., Jan. 22, 1900 — Pacific Coast Field 
Trial Club's seventeenth annual trials. The Derby — For 
pointers and setters whelped on or after January 1, 1898. 



Entrance $10, $10 additional to start. Thirty-one entries, 
fourteen starters (ten setters, four pointers). 

I. 

Schley— Stockdale Kennels' lemou and white pointer dog (AlecC— 

Flora C) with Ella E— J E Lucas' liver and white p .Inter bitch 

(Alec C— Coraj. 

Silver Star— Dr C E Wilson's black, white and tan setter dog (Star 

light— Ch Sllverplate) with — Negrj Joe— N H Hickman's black 

pointer dog (Black Bart-Faunette). 

Cuba's Z j p Stookdale Kennels' black and tan pointer dog (Cuba of 

Kenwood— Jaquina) with Lorei 7.0— Gardiner and Betten's orange 

and white setter dog (Ch Count Gladstone I V— Suver O). 

Hen C'ocker's Chi-f— W S Hobart's black, white and tan setter dog 

(Iroquois Chief— Mary Lou) — with Dixie Queen— Dr O E Wilson's 

black, white and tan setter bitch (Sam Weller— Flashlight). 

Blanco— H H Kerckhoff's white setter dog (Mercury— Sweetheart's 
Last) — with Woodcraft— Gardiner and Betten's orange and white 
setter dog (Ch Couut Uladstone — uver G). 

Pluto— Stockdale Kennels' black setter dog (The Laird— Phoebe) 

wiin — Pride of Ross— W S Davis' black, white and tan setter 

dog (Ch Cinclnnatus Pride— Flora W).| 

Duke— C Young's black, white and tan setter dog ( Luke— Dolly Wil- 
son)— with — Bonnie Gem— Gardiner and Betten's blue belton setter 
bitch (Ch Count Gladstone IV— Suver G). 

II. 

Ella E with Silver Star. i Blanco with Dixie Queen 

Negro Joe with Lorenzo | Woodcrat wlih Pride of Ross 

Cuba's Zep with Hen Crocker's I Pluto with Bonnie Gem 
Chief I Schley with Duke 

III. 

Cuba's Zep with Negro Joe. 
IV. 

Hen Crocker's chief with Woodcraft. 
RESULT. 

First, Hen Crocker's Chief; second, Woodcraft; third, Cuba's Zep. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



W. J. P. Strachan, it is reported, contemplates locating 
his kennels in Contra Costa county at a point near Walnut 
creek. 



In selecting a Pomeranian puppy which breed is on the 
boom at present, it has been suggested by an experienced 
fancier, that one should take the hardest coated, largest 
boned and longest headed puppy. 



Champion King Menelek seems to be in continuous de 
mand as a sire. The prepotency of this grand St. Bernard ; s 
remarkable. One litter after another showing the influences 
of the sire in quality and vitality with a clocklike regularity 
that is being closely observed by St. Bernard fanciers. 



W. H. McFee of Los Angeles who has heretofore been an 
ardent fox terrier admirer has recently disposed of his re- 
maining representative of the noted Los Angeles kennels, 
Blemton Bpinaway (Cb^Ble mton Victor II — Spinster) to 
W. R. Murphy, a fellow townsman. Mr. McFee will devote 
his future attention to Yorkshires. 



The crack red cocker spaniel Red Mack, owned by Mr. 
Geo. Douglas, is dead, the victim of wanton injury at the 
hands of an inferior human brute. Red Mack was sired bv the 
well known sire of reds, Red Leo, out of Jessie by Bronte by 
Brant, and was as popular in the stud as he was a favorite in 
the show ring, where in hot competition he won the follow- 
ing first prizes: 1st, Onen red class, Brooklyn, 1897; 1st 
Junior, New York, 1898; 1st Junior, Kansas City, 1898; 
1st Challenge, Toronto Fox Terrier Show; 1st Open dogs, 
Industrial Dog Show, Toronto, 1898; 1st Open, New York; 
1st Open, Grand Rapids; 1st Open, Chicago; 1st Open, Pitts- 
burg; 1st Open, Cincinnati; 1st Open, Baltimore; special for 
best red stud and one of his gel; also, special for best Red 
Cocker, dog or bitch, in the show, New York, 1899. During 
his whole career as a show cocker, be only met defeat once. 

R. H. Rountree, the genial secretary of the Pacific Bull 
Terrier Club, has somewhat reluctantly parted with his bench 
show winning dog Tabasco to Mr. A. C. Luck, a Nevada 
mining expert, who took such a fancy to Tabasco tbat be 
made the price an object and has now domiciled the bull 
terrier in Austin for tbe time being. 

Mr. Rountree has bis optics turned eastward aod promi es 
to soon be in possession of another dog that will be a high 
class one in every respect. He purchased a five months' old 
dog puppy from Mr. T. C. M. Collins a few days ago that is 
a promising young phenomenon in head tvpe and expression 
and also showing a quality of bull terrier character that is 
surprising in so young a doe. The pup is out of a litter by 
Admiral ex Woodcote Baroness. Admiral is by Champion 
Crisp ex Torpedo, a litter sister of Tommy Tickle. Wood- 
cote Baroness is by that good dog Woodcote Venom out of 
Miss Dinah by Bendigo ex Lady Dinah. 



Death of Dan's Lady. 

Mr. G. G. Williamson of Muncie, Ind., announces the 
death of his famous English setter Dan's Lady on December 
10, 1899. This great field trial winner and grand brood 
bitch was a black, white and tan, was whelped May 14, 1891, 
in the Blue Ridge Kennels aud was purchased when a puppy 
from them by Mr. Theodore Goodman of Terra Haute, Ind. 
who developed her and first ran her in field trials, she com] 
pleting her field trial career under his ownership. She wa 
trained and run in all her races by J. H. Johnson, Carlisle 8 
Ind , starting five times and being in the money each trip* 
She won the Setter Derby and afterwards the Absolute Stake 
at the trials of the American Field Trial Club, Columbus, 
Ind., November 18, 1892. Tbe All-Age Stake, United States 
trails, Bicknell, Ind , November 10, 1893. She divided 
third honors in the All-Age at the same club's trials in 1894. 
In 1895, she was placed fifth in the All-Aged Stake, United 
8 ates club's Winter trials. That Dan's Lady had superior 
field trial qualities is shown by her being placed over some 
of the best of her time, among tbem Cb. Count Gladstone 
IV., Betty 8 , Allene, Gleam's Sport, Gleam's Pink, 
Eugene T., Minnie T., Topsy's Rod, Lillian Kuseell, Miss 
Ruby and Bessie Shoupe. 



She was purchased by Mr. Williamson in April, 1896 
being in whelp to Harwick and since was bred to Ch. Count 
Gladstone IV. As a dam her record is a notable one. The 
performances of Dave Earl, Albert Lang, Lady's Count, 
Count Danstone, Uocle B., Count Ladystone and Lady's 
Count Gladstone will testify to her high class qualities Her 
sire and dam and all four of her grandparents were field 
trial winners — a pedigree unequalled by any other field trial 
winner, with but one exception, Dan Burgess, a litter brother. 
Dan's Lady was by Dan Gladstone (Ch Gladstone— Ch. 8ue) 
out of Lily Burget,s(Ch, Gath's Mark— Esther). 



Rellly's Yellow Doar. 

He was a young physician, says Wennita Dunne, with an 
cein the poorer quarter of his city, a good deal of leisure 
on his hands, and a youthful desire to do good. So when the 
Reillys, who lived around the corner in a shanty which had 
never seen better days, moved out of the neighborhood 
leaving their yellow dog behind, the doctor said it was a 
mean shame and called the dog into his office and patted 
him on the head. One such call was enough to make a 
yellow dog who was used to living out of a garbage box firm 
in the belief that he had found a friend. 

With July came the time for the young physician to take 
his annual vacation — annual because he meant it so, counting 
this as the first. He explained this to the druggist whose 
prescription blanks he used, when he used any. And the 
druggist said: 

"Say, did you notice the council passed an ordinance last 
night about shooting all unmuzzled dogs found on the street?" 

He said this because wherever the young doctor was, 
there, too, was Reilly's yellow dog. 

"The annual rabies scare is on," said the doctor, with all 
the medical man's scorn of hydrophobia. 

"I expect the Reilly dog will have to go," observed the 
druggist. 

The doctor put his hand in his pocket and jingled a 
quarter against a half. "No, he won't" came in a decisive 
tone; "I like that dog. I'm going to get a muzzle for him 
myself and put it on before I leave," and his heart expanded 
as only the prospect of committing a good action can cause it 
to expand. 

When the young physician returned from his vacation he 
was surprised to observe that there was a sneer behind the 
smile with which the druggist greeted him. This was ill- 
befitting the meeting of friends. Something made him think 
of Reilly's dog. 

"Where's the dog?" he suddenly asked. 

The druggist grinned. Then he asked : "Say, did you 
ask any one to take that muzzle off once in awhile and feed 
him while you were gone? " 

The doctor's face fell. "No," he said, "I forgot that. 
Where, where is he?" he faltered. 

"Sausage now," said the druggist, turning away to wait on 
a customer. In a few minutes he came back. 

"That's the way you blamed philanthropists always do 
things," he said, savagely. "I'll be blessed if I don't think 
people and things would get along a lot better without you." 

The doctor looked glum. "There'e something in what 
you say," he admitted, humbly, "but physicians and philan- 
thropists have to get their experience, somehow." 



Kennel ilegistry. 



Visits, Sales, Whelps and Names Claimed published in this column 
free of charge. Please use the following form : 
VISITS. 

Lawrence Dunn's Irish water spaniel bitch Bessie !>• 
(Dan C— Ch. Nora W.) to W. H. Williams' Ch. Dan Ma- 
loney (imp Musba— Biddy Malone) January 18, 1900. 

Gus Pe ers' cocker spaniel bitch Nellie Abbott (Jumie II. 
— Jet Ford) to Plumeria Cocker Kennels' Champion 
Viscount (Ch. Picpania — Tootsie) January 16, 1900. 

Plumeria Cocker Kennels' cocker spaniel bitch Plumeria 
Princess (Ch. Viscount— Oakside Triloy) to same owners 
Plumeria Oyes (Ch Viscount— Omo Girl) January 20, 1800. 

Mrs. J G. Sterlings's cocker spaniel bitch Babv (imp. 
Balmore Castle — imp. Alma) to Plumeria Cocker Kennels' 
Champion Viscount (Ch. Picpania — Tootsie) January 
22, 1900. 

Mrs J. L. Lewis' rough coat St. Bernard bitch Lady 
Alice R. (Ch. California Bernardo — Princess Royal) to Mrs. 
C G. Saxe's Champion King Menelek (Reglov — Empress 
Frances), January 25, 1900. 

8ALE3. 

R. H. Rountree sold the bull terrier dog Tabasco (Ch. 
Harper Whiskey — Daisy Belle) to A. C. Luck (Austin, Nev.) 
January 17, 1900. 

T. 0. M. Collins sold a bull terrier dog puppy (Admiral — 
Woodcote Baroness) to R. H. Rountree, January 17, 1900. 
WHELPS. 

J. B. Martin's (San Francisco, Cal ) fox terrier bitch 
Champion Golden Jewel (Blemton Roefer — Ch. Blemton 
Brilliant) whelped December 31, 1899, five puppies — 3 dogs 
— to same owners' Melon Swagger (Ch. D'Orsay — Dusky 
Pearl). 

J. A. 8argent'8 (Sargents, Cal) fox terrier bitch Coquette 
(Blemton Reefer — Victoria Caprice) whelped January — , 
1900, four puppies — 2 dogs— to J. B. Martin's Aldon 
Swaggger (Ch. D'Orsay — Dusky Pearl). 

J. L. Cunningham sold a Great Dane bitch puppy by 
King R — Princess Degmar to Mrs. Trognitz (San Diego) 
January 25, 1900. 

J. L. Cunningham sold a Great Dane dog puppy by King 
R— Princess Dagmar to Graham E. Babcock (Coronudo) 
December 23, 1899. 



60 



[January 27, 1900 



THE FARM. 



A Simple Way to Test Seeds. 



Testing seeds on the farm is such a highly 
satisfactory practice that, haviog tried it once 
by a good method, it is likely to become an 
established feature. Nothing can be more 
vexatious then to carefully manure and pre- 
pare a piece of ground for some particular 
crop, plant the seed just at the right time and 
in the right manner, and then, after waiting 
a reasonable time finally discover that poor 
seed has been procured in the beginning and 
that only a part of it has come up. Experi- 
ence like this can be avoided by seed testingt 
which is in reality a very simple thing, and 
requires absolutely no outlay of money. In 
the first place, seed should be procured early 
in the season, to alio* plenty of time to return 
it and procure other seed, in case it is found 
to be poor. 

All the apparatus necessary for ordinary 
testing of the germinating powers of seeds is 
a tin pan, like a cake or breiid pan, a little 
cotton cloth or shee'ing and a dozen or to 
sticks, long enough to reach across the short 
way of the pan. Two little headless brads 
can be driven into each stick, which should 
have square edges bo as to rest steadily on the 
pan, and on these pins pieces of cloth can be 
hooked at the four corners. These cloths or 
bags should have a strip sewed at the bottom 
which will reach to the bottom of the pan, 
while the bag itself, in the bottom of which 
are placed the seeds, is midway tbe depth r>f 
the pan. Water should be placed in the pan, 
but not enough to reach the seeds; they will 
be moistened by water drawn up by the lower 
strip or wick. 

The pan should be kept in as even a tem- 
perature as possible, rangii g from 65 to 85 
degrees. Only one kind of seed should be 
placed in each bag and a certain number of 
these seeds should be counted out when so 
placed and a record kept on an accompanying 
slip. After the seeds have been given suffi- 
cient time to sprout, they should be counted 
and the percentage of tbe good seed reckoned 
The work takes comparatively little time and 
will be found very interesting. For instance 
take a test of alfalfa seed; in extracting a 
sample, tbe seed should be thoroughly mixed 
and stirred and then a pinch taken at random 
and, say fifty or a 100 seeds counted out and 
placed in tbe bag, where they may remain for 
ten days. Many of them, however, will 
sprout before the expiration of that period 
and these should be removed and a record 
kept of them. Pome seeds of course start 
more eatily than other kinds. 

The following periods may be stated as the 
limits required for the germination of good 
seed of the kinds named : For cereals, peas, 
beans, vetches, eur flower, buckwheat, alfalfa, 
corn and cow peas, ten days: for serradelia, 
beet balls, rye grassee, timotky, tobacco, and 
other feed and vegetable seeds, fourteen davs. 
grass seeds are slow to start, and for all grasses 
except rye and timothy, from twenty to 
twenty eight davs are required. Kentucky 
bluegrass and Bermuda grass are very slow to 
start, if the seeds are good and fresh, most 
of them will sprout in less than half tbe time 
allowed for the test. It is essential, of course, 
to see that there is never lack of moisture for 
the seeds and that the cloths are never al- 
lowed to become dry. It is also advisable to 
soak the seeds during tbe first ten hours by 
putting enough water in tbe pan to touch tbe 
bottoms of the bags; this will hasten the ger- 
minating proce-e, but too much wetting will 
tend to spoil the seeds — G E. Mitchell. 



Praotioal Poultry Points. 



The pure bred hen will usually lay more 
eggs than any cross of the same breed, and 
many more than the scrub hen with a mix- 
ure of a half dozen different breeds in her 
makeup. If she does not it is the fault of the 
one who cares for her. Pome breeders really 
know more about the markin s of the feathers 
and shape of the comb than they do about 
feeding their poultry, and they care more 
about having these points just right than 
they do about tbe number cf eggs they re" 
ive. If they can get eggs in the sprii g 
when they are wanted for hatching, they are 
contented with that. 



In this way some strains of pure Dred fowl 
may have been so kept and managed that 
they produce a less cumber of eggs in a year 
than they would under better conditions, and 
as tbe chickens inherit tbe propensities of th 
parent and tbe grandparents they deteriorate 
in productiveness as much as a herd of dairy 
cattle would if kept in such a way that they 
were not up to their standard in milk pro- 
duction. 

But because certain strains under this man- 
agement do not produce many eggs, it doe 9 
not disprove the statement with which we be- 
gan. Place the pure bred hens and chickens 
under the care of a good feeder, and in three 
generations they can be made to produce more 
eggs than can he produced by any cross bred 
or scrub-bred fowl. By selection of eggs from 
the best layers among lhe"i, this can be 
brought about, and the poultry keeper who 
expects to grow chickens next spring should 
begin this winter to feed his bens for egic 
production, and should watch them to see 
which to save eggs from for hatching. We 
have never attained tbe 20 dozen a year mark, 
and never expect to, for we cannot devote our 
time to. tbe poultry yard, but we believe it to 
be possible and desirable and think it possible 
without losing any of the fancy points called 
for by the poultry standard, though it might 
take a longer time if we tried to combite the 
fancy points and the egg production at the 
same time than it would if we only selected 
the best layers without regard to the mark, 
ings, as it would limit our number to select 
from. 

Hold the Oow to a Good Age. 



We do not agree with the notion that every 
cow should be forced and run through as 
quickly as possible and then discarded 
Rather, we say, get a good cow and then take 
measures to keep her in good paying shape as 
long as possible. Cows twelve to fifteen years 
old often do as well or better than younger 
ones. We have a cow fully fifteen years old 
which gives as much milk now as she ever 
did. 

It does not irjure a cow to feed her well, 
even with a rich ration, if this is done in 8 
rational manner. It is not tbe use cf a cow 
to her full capacity which destroys, but rather 
abuse by unwise feedirg and handling We 
believe that almost any good cow, rightly 
managed, will yield well nigh her full quail 
tity and quality of milk up to the age (if from 
><ix to eignt yem? It takes two or ihr-e 
years afier she first comes to get the heifer up 
to her full capacity. Therefore we should 
keep her as long as we can profitably when 
she getN to be a mature cow, and not be pos- 
eseed of the false idea that a cow should be 
gotten rid of while she is yet in her prime. 
( ontinually making unnecessary changes in 
the personnel of the dairy cows occasions 
many troubles and annoyances that may just 
as well be saved. 

The Profile of a Dairy Herd. 



W. 8. Smith, Zionsville, Ind., a breeder of 
Jersey, cattle and a dairyman who makes 
hutter, receives 30 cents a pound eight 
months in the year and 25 cents for four 
months. He keeps accurate record of his 
cows' work. One year he milked ten cows, 
two of tbem young (second calves), balance in 
their prime His receipts for Hutier sold that 
year were $76 20 per cow. No accouni was 
taken of the increase, consisting of ten calve*; 



nor was tbe milk and butter used in a large 
family, nor skim milk and buttermilk fed to 
calves and hogs, figured up. 

Mr. Smith now milks from 16 to 22 reg- 
istered Jerseys. He has studied rations very 
closely, and come to the conclusion that a 
mixture of four parts bran and shorts to one 
part corn meal, makes as good a dairy feed as 
he has tried' 



As a result of the meeting of the National 
Dairymen's Uuion held at Chicago, Repre- 
sentative Towney of Minnesota has intro- 
duced the following resolution in (Congress: 
'Whereas, there was manufactured in the 
United States during the fiscal year ending 
June 30 1899,83 141,080 pounds or 41,750 
tons of oleomargarine, being an increase in 
production over the fiscal year ended June 
30 1899, of 25 634,445 pounds, and. the man- 
ufacture and sale of oleomargarine, colored as 
butter, is prohihited by law in thirty time 
States of the Uuion, now, therefore, Be it re- 
solved, that the secretary of the treasury be 
and he is hereby requested to furnish to the 
House of Representatives information as to 
the particular Stales in which oleomargarine 
is shipped and distributed by tbe producers, 
the amount in pounds shipped or distributed 
in each State and also, the number of licences 
i-sued to persons in the several States for the 
manufacture or sale, either by wholesale or 
retail, of ole -margarine, stating the number 
of such licenses issued to persons in each 
State." The information called for by the 
resolution is desired by tbe dairymen as a 
preparation f >r their struggle for a modifica- 
'inn of the oleomargarine law. 



POP <sAI F Kori< YEAR OLD COLT by 
1 KJIK. OftLL, Deitcrwooi out ot Abbess by 
Joliet, son of Nutwood Is a handsome bay with 
black points, stands lo.H and weiuhs about 10U0 
pounds. I< well broke, kind and gt-nlle. a square 
trotter and Irolted a quarter In 40 seconds as a >ear- 
ling. Never twined, This is a splendid pro pect 
and ought to be in the hands of some one who 
would develop him For sale solely for the reason 
thHt the owner dhs no lime to devote 'o him. Apply 
tooraddret-B, Dr. K. T. LEANER, 

703 Market Street, San FrancUco. 



To Horse Owners. 



Palace Hotel 
Supper Room 



The moderate charges, de- 
lightful orchestral concerts 
and the undouhted luxury 
are the attributes that make 
the new Supper Room at the 
Palace Hotel the favorite 
place for after theatre parties. 
Open every evening (Sundays 
excepted) from 9:30 to 12 
o'clock. Entrance from main 
office and grand court, 

JOHN C. KIRKPATRICK, Manager. 



For Sale 



ONE 

2; 



BLACK FILLY bv Geo, Dexter 
8 1-3. (A full sister to Telephone Itftjg ) 
TWO THREE YEAR OLD COLTS by 
Waldatein out of mares by ,Noond^y 10,0t0. 

ONE THREE YEAR OLD COLT by 
Waldateiu out of a Monroe Chief inare. 

Apply to or address 
BUCK 31 ANN AND C ARK AG HER, 

.Saddle Rock Restaurant, 
Sacramento, Cal. 




Millard F. Sanders has located at Pleasanton, 
where he will conduct a first class training stable 
Gentlemen having colts or horses they wish devel 
oped for sale or racing purposes can be accommo- 
dated. Correspondence solicited. 

SMITHS 

CASH STORE 

Th ml i hi * ' 1 ' - i 1 1 . 1 1 largest mail order nouse. 

Ask for Catalogue, free. I O'BKIEN & SONS, Agents, 

25-37 Market St., near the Ferry. ' San Francisco Cal. 

fMUNHHUPm niniifiiiiin,iiiiiiiiiiiniLiiiiiiiini r^^^^y^^ j s^ > ^ < ^ ww w ^ < ^ w ^ < ^ w » < s ^vj ^ > ^ « - 

| Your stable is not complete without (juinn's C 
= Ointment. An infallible cure for all ordi- > 
= nary horse afflictions. Follow the example 
*f set by the leading horsemen of the world and 
| your stable shelf will always hold a bottle of 




Quinn's Ointment 

A. L. Thomas, Supt. Canton Farm, Joliet, 111., remarks, 
"I enclose you amount for six bottles of Quinn's Ointment. 
After one year's trial must confess it does all you claim for 
it." For Curbs, Splints, Spavins, Wind puff a or Buuub.es, 

Price $1.50. 
I ^old by all Druggists or sent by 
E int.il. 



•rimiiiiintmiiiMiiiir 



W. B. EDDY & CO.. Whitehall. N. Y. 



RUINART STOCK FARM 

Beltane, Sonoma County, Cal. 

TARC00LA, PRIMROSE, RUINABr— Thoroughbred Stallions. 



Will Stand the Season at Ruinart Stock Farm. 



fStockwell 3 



2 5 



The Marquis 2., 



(.Cimyelll 2 

{Leamington 14. 
Satanella 3_ 



King of the Ring 3..-J 



f Ace of Clubs 8., 



l.Ro>e de Florence 3 j 



MilkB p 12. 



fEbor 

I (Winner of Hoori- 
— 'i wood Cup, '2 miles 110 

(.Maid ot the Mill 12... 

Tarcoola wss winner of the Melbourne Cup worth 
$60,000, also of other Kreat races It will be feen at a 
glance that his pedig'ee is Ixirly bitMlint! wl'hsire 
figures aecoroiug to the Bruce LoweKystem within the 
first four removes. Service fee «50. 



i The Baron 24 
i Pocahontas 3 

I Touchstone 1 4 
I Brocade 2 

| Faugh-a-Ballagh 11 
I Dau. ol I'anialoon 14 

I Newminster 8 
I Flighty 3 

I Rockwell 3 
I Ir.sh Queen 8 

Flying Dutchman 3 
Boarding School Miss 3 

The Premier 4 
Dinah 



Rosy O' Moore 
Mary Anne 13 

And so on to the Old 
Montague Mare, the fam- 
ily ol the great Kclipse. 



PRIMROSE by imp. St. Blaise 

1st dam Wood Violet by Imp. The III Used; 2d dam Woodbine by 
Censor or Kentucky; 3d dam Fleur des Champs by Newminster; 
and so on to Lay ton Barb Mare. Stud Service S50. 



BEST OF PASTURAGE 

Green Feed throughout the Year. 

"Alfilleree," Egyptian Corn, Forghum and other snmmer crops in abun- 
dance 

Bes-t ot care taken of broodmares and horses in training Paddocks of one, 
two and thiee acres for S'ailions. Box -ta'ls and R»ce Track for the 
use of those desiring to train. Horses thipped direct to Farm from 
Emeryville and San Francisco. 
For terms apply to 

R. PORTER ASHE, 

328 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

Ku. mi* 502-505 Safe Deposit Building. 



Januabt 27, 1900] 



wtjis greener cnto ^vort*wtaw. 



61 



WESTCHESTER 

RAGING ASSOCIATION. 

Events to close Midnight of Tuesday, Feb. 6 h. 
To be run in May, 1900, at Morris Park, New York. 



GAIETY— Fillies, two years old; condition, 81000 
added. Half a mile. 

BOCQCET— Two years old. Sel ing. SK0O added. 
Five furlougg. 

LAUREATK-Two years old; condition, J1200 
added. Five furlongs. 

LARCHMONT —Three yearsold. Maidens. S1C00 
added Seven furlongs. 

BATCHESTEK- Three \ears old. Non-winners of 
S1000. Conditions, 810,0 added. Withers Mile. 

VAN NEST— Three years o d. selling. S1C0O added 
Six aud a half furlongs. 

POCANTICO H ANDICAP— Three years old. 
81200 added. Mile and a sixteenth. 

METROPOLITAN HANDICAP— Three and 
upward. 85000 added. Withers Mile. 

HAKEEM— Three and upward. Selling. S1000 
added Withers Mile. 

TOBOGGAN H \NDICA P— Three and upward- 
f 1000 added. Eclipse Course. 

NEW ROCUELLK HANDICAP— Three and 
upward. 810J0 added. Seven furlongs. 



HIGH WEIGHT SERIAL HANDICAPS— 

Thiee and upward. 

CKOTONA-81000 added. Six furlongs. 
CLAREMONT-S1000 added Six and a 

half furlongs. 
VAN COBTLANDT— $1000 added. Seven 

furlongs. 

Note— Entrance, SiO each for the three race?. 

AMATEUR CUP— Three and upward. Selling. 
40 lbs. above the scale. Gentlemen riders. SlOuO 
added. Withers Mile. 

STEEPLECHASES AND HURDLE RACES. 

ST. NICHOLAS HURDLE— Condition. SHOO 
ad ie t. Mile and a half, six hurdles. 

KNICKKRBitCKK.lt HURDLE HANDI- 
CAP— 8ti> added Mile and three-quar- 
ters, seven hurdles. 

MAIDEN STEEPLECHASE— Condition, $600 
added About two miles. 

NEW YORK STE »-PLECHASE— Condition, 
8750 adde<1. About two miles. 

INTERNATIONAL STEEPTECHASE 
HANDICAP-Jioro added About two 
miles and a half. 



For Sale 



Events to close February 6th, to be run in October, 1900. Supple^ 
mentary Entry to close August 15th. 



NURSERY HANDICAP-Two year olds. 82EOO 
added. Eclipse Course. 

CHAMPAGNE— Two years old. Condition, SlcOO 
added. Seven furlongs. 

WHITE PLAINS HANDICAP— Two years 
old. $2000 added. Eclipse Course. 

JEROME HANDICAP — Three years old. $1500 
added. Mile aud a quarter. 



MUNICIPAL HANDICAP— Three and up- 
ward. $2500 added Mile and three-quar- 
ters. 

MORRIS PARK HANDICAP— Three and up- 
ward $3000 added. Two inil.s and a 
quarter. 

MANHATT VN HANDICAP -All ages. §1500 
added. Eclipse Course. 

Other events for two-vear:olds. three-year-olds, three 
and upward and for all ages, will be duly an- 
nounced to be run at the Autumn meeting to 
close August loth, ltOU. 



Washington Jockey Club 

Handicap to close February 6th. 
To be run in April at Bennings, Washington, D. C. 

BENNINGS SPRING HANDICAPS, to be run on the first and last days of the meeting. By 
subscription of 810 each, which shall entitle Ihe entry to start in the First aud Second Handicaps on 
payment of the additional siarting fee of $20 each. 

FIRST BENNINGS SPRING HANDICAP— $700 added. Six furlongs. 

SECOND BENNINGS SPRING HANDICAP— $1000 added. Seven furlongs. 

Notice— To owners and trainers. The overnight programme* will include races for two-year-olds and 
three-year-olds, also steeplechases and hurdle races, the conditiors of which will be Bimilar to those 
that have heretofore closed m February. 

For entry blanks, address the office of the Breeder and Sportsman. 

H G. CRICKMORE, 

Clerk of the Course, 

173 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 



Sired by the Greatest Son of George Wilkes. Dam 
by the Greatest Living Stre. 

RED NUTTLE 

No. 357. 

Buy stallion, foaled May, 1892. Sired bv the 
mighty Red Wiikes Dam Nutila (dam of Red Nut- 
tling 2 : 1 1 J 2 ) by Nutwood, the ting of livine trotting 
sires: secoDd dam Hildegarde bv Harold 413, sire of 
Maud H. 2:08%, etc ; third dam Betsy Irotwood by 
Idol 177 (son of MambMno Chief): fourth dam 
Pilotta by Glasgow's Pilot (son of Pilot Jr 12); fifth 
dam Dairy Maid by Vermont Black lawk 5, etc 

Price reasonable. For further particulars address 
WILD FLO WE 't STOCK FARM, 

Conejo, Fresno Co., Cal 



For Sale. 



One of the finest BREW8TER VICTORIAS; alio 
elegant BrewMer Family Carriage: also one very 
handsome Coupe. All In first class condition. 
Apply at 1011 Sutter St.,. F. S 

GOOD YOUNG ROADSTERS FOR SALE. 

On account ot the scarcity of cars I find it impos- 
sible to take all the horses in my string at Gllroy to 
New York, and have a iew well broke, sound and 
handsome young roadsters for sale here. For prices 
apply to or call on BUDD DOBLE, 

Gllroy, Cal. 



PLEASANTON 

Training Track Association. 



The following list of horses trained and developed on the track 
together with records obtained, will speak forcibly as to the great 
advantages offered to the patrons of the track, no records over 2:1 
being included. 



This track, celebrated all 
over the State as much 
for its splendid condition, 
despite all the changes of 
weather, as for its superb 
climate, has passed into 
new hands. Two hundred 
splendid new box stalls 
have been erected and the 
most thorough system of 
water laid on, conveying 
water to all stalls. The 
track itself has been thor- 
oughly overhauled andput 
in to the best shape pos- 
sible. The association is 
now ready to receive 
horses. 



SEARCHLIGHT, 2:03 1-4. 

ANACONDA, 2:03 1-4. Champion pacing gelding of the world 
to date. 

DIRECTLY, 2 :03 1 -4. Two year old record champion, 2:07^ 
Three year old record champion, 2:07, 

ALIX, 2:03 3-4. Champion mare, champion race record of the 

world for three heats. 2:06V.i. 2:05!4, 2:05%. 

FLYING JIB, 2:04. 1 .59^ to pole 

AZOTE, 2:04 3-4. Champion gelding of the world to date. 
DIRECTUM, 2:05 1-4. Champion stallion ot the world to date. 
DIRECT, 2:05 1-2. Champion pacer of his time 
KLATAWAH, 2 :05 1-2. Three year old. 
iLENA N., 2:05 1-2. Champion pacing mare of 1898. 
! CONEV, 2:07 3-4. 
j DIONE, 2:09 1-4. 

I DIABLO, 2 :09 1-4. As a four year old. 
j CRICKET, 2:10. Record for pacing mare at that time. 
LITTLE ALBERT, 2:10. 

SAN PEDRO, 2:10. Winner of three raceB and 86000 in one week. 
GOLD LEAF, 2:11. Champion three year old of her time. 
VENUS II, 2:11 1-4. 
OWYHEE, 2:11 1-4. 

MONBARS, 2:111-4. As a three year old. 
CALYLE CARNE, 2:11 3-4. 

MARGARET S., 2:12. Winner of last Horseman's Great Ex- 
pectation Stakes, 810,000 in coin and a 8200 cup. 

Address C. B. CHARLESW0RTH, Pleasanton, Alameda County, Cal. 



RENTALS- »2 per month 

Special lar«e boxes for studs. 

etc., twenty-five feet long, S3 

per month 
Board, etc., for men, 816 per 

mouth 



TO 
OR 



BUY 
SELL 



A HORSE, 



Come to the office of the Breeder and 
Sportsman, register your wants and place an 
advertisement in the columns of the paper. 
By this means you can make a sale or a purchase sooner and with less expense than 
by any other method. 



Do You Want a Camera? 



Takes a Picture 
4x3 




The Gem Poco 




FOR THREE NEW SUBSCRIBERS TO THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



It is equipped with a newly discovered fixed focus GEM lens, constructed on 
an entirely new principle, (jiving a great depth of focus, cutting the plates 
clear and sharp to their full tuze, together with rottry diaphragm with three 
apertures, Rochester safety shutter arranged for time or instantaeous expos 
ures, and speed regulator. 

As all working parts are made flush with the camera box, there is no possi- 
bility of their becoming broken or getting out of order. 



THE GEM POCO is a 4x5 camen, constructed with a universal or fixed 
focus lens that will take a picture clear and sharp at the outer edge as well 
as at the center This was deemed an impossibility until last season, when 
the GEM POCO demonstrated that it could be done. And yet no others 
have succeeded in obtaining this much desired result 

It is covered with fine Morocco grain leather, has leather handle, two tripod 
plates, and two large brilliant oblong view finders, made in proportion to the 
plate, which insures the correct position of the views. 

Any one sending us three new yearly subscribers, accompanied by the cash ($9.00), will be sent a GEM POCO. 
If you intend to get up a club, send for sample copies, to be used in canvassing, or send us a list of names of people 
you intend to see, and sample copies will be sent to them from this office. BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

22-24 Geary Street - San Francisco, Cal. 



P. S. — The Net Price of This Camera is $5, and Will be Furnished for that Amoont in Cash. 



62 



[January 27, 1900 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Pabrott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 
Green's Bnfus 63 

Will serve a limited number of approved mares season 1900 

FEE - - - $75. 

Reductions made for two or more mares. 



HAMBLETONIAN WILKES 

(No. 1679). 



BREED TO A 
GREAT SIRE OF 
RACE HORSES. 



Sire of 

Phoebe Wilkes 2:C8>£ 

Tommy Mc 2M\ 

New Era 2:13 

Rihyl 8 2:16%, 

Salville 2:17i< 

Rocker 2:ll»(, 

^Arline Wilkes ?:ll'4< 

Aeroplane 2:16>^ 

Grand George 2:18 

J. F Hanson 2:19'^ 

Brown Bess 2:24% 

And 19 other? better than 
2:30, and li producing sons 
and 6 producing daughters. 



► HAMBLETONIAN WILKES, by George Wilkes 2:22, dam 
Mag Lock, by American Star; Becond dam Lady Irwiu (grandam of 
Lumps 2:21), by Hambletonian 10; third dam Daughter ot Roe's At> 
dallah Chief. 

SEASON OF 1900 $50. 

Usual return privilege: excellent pasturage and best ot care taken ot 
mares, 84 per month, at Green Meadow Farm. Address 

R. I. MOORHEAD, 
Green Meadow Farm, Santa Clara, Cal 



DIRECT 2i05 1-2 



.SIKE OF 



Directum Kelly, 2:08 1-4 
Directly - - - 2:031-4 
Miss Margaret - 2:11 1-2 
Ed B. Young - - 2:11 1-4 
I Direct - - - - 2:13 
Miss Beatrice - 2:13 1-4 
And 13 t he r Standard Trotters and Pacers 
Terras, $100 the Season 

Is now in the stud at HEATING'S STABILES 
at Pleasanton, California track. 

Excellent pasturage and the best of care taken of 
mares in any manner that owners may desire at 
reasonable rates. Apply to 

THOMAS E. KEATING, Pleasanton, Cal. 




m 



Sulkies Built to Order! 



REPAIRED and CONVERTED. 

Lined up to run perfect when strapped to 
horse. 

OUK SPECIALTY 

^SULKIES TO RENT 

We but and skll Second hand Sulkies. 
W. J. KKNN'KV, Blkeman, 

581 Valencia St.. near 16th 



["THE SEARCHLIGHT" 

Thos. B. Murphy 

Scientific Farrier. 

TROTTING, ROAD AND PLAIN SHOEING. 

. . . 23 Golden Gate Avenue . . . 

Branch Shop— Keating'sTrainingStables, Pleas- 
anton, Cal. All work guaranteed. 
Telephone Folsom 871. 



BAYSWATER WILKES 



Sire of KELLY BRIQGS 2:10 1=2. 

Will Make the Season of 1900 at Winters, Yolo Co., Cal. 

SABLE W'LKES 2'18 his sire, is the sire of 32 standard performers, including Oro Wilkes 
2:11, and is bv Guy Wilk 's 2:Wk (sire of Cred Kohl f.0~i\, Hulda 2:09% and 58 others in 2:30), by 
Geo. Wilkes 2:22, sire of 83 standard performers. 

FANNY BAYSWATER, his dam. is a thoroughbred mare by Bayswater and is the dam of 

Senator L. 2:23"^, (four mile record 10:12). 

BESSIE SEDGWICK, his second dam. is a thoroughbred mare by Joe Daniels, and the dam of 

Bessie Thorne 2:22% Third, fourth, filth, sixth, seventh and eighth dams registered in Ameri- 
can Thoroughbred ritud Book. 

Kelly Briggs 2 :10>y as a four year old was one of the best winners on the California circuit laBt year, 
and Is theonly one of Bayswater Wilkes' produce ever trained up to that time. 



TERMS FOR SEASON 



$40 



(With Usual Return Privileges) 



Good pasturage at $3.00 per month. All bills due at time of service, but must be paid when mare 
leave* the farm. MareB coming from the north or from Sacramento can be shipped to Al. Grie ves, Davis- 
ville, and will receive prompt attention. Others Bhould be shipped direct to Winters. 

S. H. HOY, Owner, 

Winters, Yolo Co., Cal 



Alameda Sale and Training Stables. 

Stallions for Service, Season 1 

Alameda - California. 

J. M. NELSON - Proprietor. 




ALTAMONT 3600 

(By Almont 33. Dam, Sue Ford by 
Brown Chief) 

S1BE OF 

CHEHAIIS 2:04 1-4 

DEL NORTH 2:08 

ELLA T 2:08 1-4 

DOC SPKKRY 2:09 

PATHMONT 2:09 1-4 

ALT AO 2:09 3-4 

ALAMEDA 2:15 

DECEIVER 2:15 

TODCHET _ " ..2:15 

CARRIE S 2:17 1-2 

and 31 others in the 2:30 list. ' 

Terms for the Season - $60 

With Usual Return Privileges. 

Good Pasturage at reaaonable rates, 
or track. Apply to or addresa 



ARTHUR W. 2:11 1-2 

Sire WAYLAND W. 2 12 1-2 by Arthur 

Wilkes 2*28 1-2. 
Dam LADY MOOR (dam of Arthur W 
2:11 1-2. John A. |3) 
2:14. Maud P. (3) 2:26'^ 
trial 2 13 1-2), by 
Grand Moor; second 
dam by lm. li'. Glen- 
eoe, sou of Imp. Glen- 
coe: third dam by 
Williamson's Belmont. 
Arthur W. Is the bandsomei-t horse of bis size in 
California, being a rich brown seal in color, stand- 
ing 16.2 and weighing 1200 lbs He has been a 
money winner every year of the three he has been 
campxigned and during the season of 1899 won two 
first moneys, two seconds, one third and one fourtb. 
and reduced his record to 2:11V He will be cam- 
paigned ag» in in 19 and will pace in 2:16 sure. 
Consequently he will be limiied to 10 approved 
mares. 

Terms for the Season - $40 

With Usual Return Privileges. 

Horses bought, sold and trained for road 

J. M. NELSON. 



Cor. St. Charles St. 



and Eagle Avenue, 

Alameda, California 



Breed to a Trie d Sire. 

McKINNEY 8818, Rec. 2:lli 

(By Alcyone, dam Rosa Sprague by Gov. Sprague) 

CHAMPION SIRE OF HIS AGE OF 2:15 PERFORMERS. 



McKINNEY 2:11 1-4. 
8ire of 

' oney (4) 2:07% 

lenny Mac 2:09 

Zomhro 2:11 

You Bet (3), 2:12!^ 

Hazel Kiuney 2:12V5 

MtZeus 2:13 

luliet D 2:1354 

Dr. Book (4) 2:13% 

Harvey Mbc «) 2:14»J 

Geo W. MtKinney 2:14 V4 

Osito 2:14%, 

Msmi3 Riley 2:16 

Mabel McKinney 2:17 

McNally (4) _ 2:20 

Miss Baruabee (3) 2:21 

flola 2:23 

Casco » 2:2tV 

Sir Credit (3) 2:25 

Kula Mc (2) 2:27>^ 



A Race Horse Himself 

He i-tarted in 28 races, won 25 of them, was twice second 
and once third. 

He is a Sire of Race Horses. 

Every one ol his get with records secured them in races, 
and all are race winners. 

WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1900 

At Pleasanton Training Track. 

TERMS FOR THE SEASON $75. 

(With Usual Return Privileges). 

Good Pasturage for mares at $3 per month. 

For further particulars, address 
Or 985 Peralta flt . Oakland. C. A. DURFEb, 

Telephone Red 2621. Pleasanton, Cal. 



DIABLO 2:092 



The Leading 
Pacifc Coast Si e of New 
4 2:30 Performers of 1899. 

A SENSATIONAL PERFORMER ON THE TRACK AND 
A SENSATIONAL SIRE OF SPEED IN THE STUD.... 

At ten years of age he has to his credit Clipper 2:09 3 4, Daeda- 
lion (4) 2:11, Diawood (4) 2:11, Hijo del Diablo (3) 2:1 \%, Inferno 
13)2:15, El Diablo 2:16J£, Goff Topsail 2:17)^, N. L B. (2) 2:21>» 
Rey del Diablo (2) 2:23%. 

DIABLO is by Chas. Derby a great sire, out of Bertha a great broodmare by Alcantara. His colts are 
showing greater speed each year and are noted for uniform beauty, size and style. 



FEE FOR SEASON OF 1900 



$50 



Pasturage for mares at 84 per month. Good care taken but no responsibility assumed for accidents 
orescape8 WM. MURRAY, Pleasanton, Cal. 



GAFF TOPSAIL 2:17a 

Will Make the Season of 1900 at the Vallejo Race Track. 

TERMS $25 FOR THE SEASON 

Only son of Diablo standing for public service in Solano Co. Gaff Topsail is one of the fastest horses 
in the state; io absolutely sound and bas perfect legs and feet. ™,„„j j.„ aw r »h.m v,„ 

Gaff TopFail is by Diablo, dam Belle by Alcona 730 son ° , K A1 ™°»VHi, Sf™^^ by 
Jim Lick, son of Homer, he by Mambrino Patchen; third dam by Billy Cheatham, thoroughbred. 

Free Purse $250 for Gaff Topsail Three-Year-Olds. 

I will gl /e a purse of »250 entrance fee for foals of 1901 sired by Gaff Topsail, mares covered in 1900 to 
be competed for In 1901 at the Vallejo Race Track. 

'.EDW. KAVANAQH, Box 366, Vallejo, Cal. 



January 27, 1900] 



63 



BOODLE 2\W 2 

Sire of Ethel Downs 2:10, Thompson 2:14 1-2, Val- 
entine [2] 2:30, and others. 
Boodle possesses all the qualifications desired in a Sire. 

Mr. B . a prominent horseman from the East, recently remarked In hearing of a crowd of horse" 

men: "1 believe Boodle is destined to be a great sire o( speed, but laying speed aside, his colts with ihei' 
size, style, beautiful mane and tail and toppy appearauce in general, with 3-minute speed will sell Eas' 
for more money than the little bullet-shaped cyclones such as are frequently produced with 2:15 speed. 

Avoid breeding to Boodle 2:12 1-2, 

IF YOU WANT a pony, or a lone-backet, curby hocked, bU-ankled. or a vicious horse. 

Breed to Boodle 2:121-2, 

IF YOU WANT a well-bred horse, with size, color, speed, beauty, endurance, and 
disposition. 

SEASON - - $50 

(Usual Return Privilege) 
C. F. BUNCH, Mgr. Q. K. HOSTETTER & CO. 

«S- Send for tabulated pedigree. San Jose, Cal. 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2216 

By Guy Wilkes 2:15 1=4, dam Lida W. 2:18 1=4, by Nutwood 2:18 3=4. 



Race Record 
2:16 1-2. 



Race Rd 
2:16%. 



Nutwood Wilkes 2216, 

Is the Sire of 

Who Is It 2:10 1-3 

Three- y ar-old record 2:12. 
John A. MrKerron (8). ..2 :12 1-4 

Claudius 2:13 1-2 

Irvington Helle 2:18 1-2 

Echora Wilkes 2:18 1-2 

Central Girl 2:22 1-2 

Allx B _ 2:24 1-2 

Who la She 2:25 

Fred Wilkes 2:26 1-2 

Daughestar 2:29 



NUTWOOD WILKES is the Champion Sire 
of Early and Extreme Speed. 

He istheonly stallion who ever produced two three-year-olds 
in one season with records of 3:13 and 2:12 1-4 respect- 
ively. Who Is It is the champion three-year-old gelding 
ol the world, and last year reduced his record to 2;10%. 
NUTWOOD WILKKS will make the spawn of 1900 at 
the NUTWOOD STOCK FARM from Fell. 15 to July 1. 

TERMS : $50 FOR THE SEASON. 

With u-ual return privileges Good pasturage at S3 per month 
Bills payable before removal of mate Stock well cared for, 
but no responsibility assumed for accident* and escapes. 
For further particulars apply to, or address, 

flARTIN CARTER, Nutwood Stock Farm, 

-g5 Irvington, Alameda Co., Cal. 



SPLENDID PASTURAGE. 

BRENTWOOD FARM, near Antioch, Contra Costa Co., Cal, 

Horses are shipped from Morshead's Stable, No. 20 Clay Street, "San Francisco, to Antioch and led from 
Antioch to the Farm by Competent men. 



ALFALFA and natural grasses in abundance 
CLIMATE mild winter and summer 



SEPARATE ALFALFA FIELDS if desired 
SPECIAL CAKE taken of HORSES 
FINEST of PADDOCKS for STALLIONS. 

For rates apply to H. DUTARD, Owner. 
125-127-129 DAVIS Street (Telephone Front 33; SAN FRANCISCO 

Or to FRANK NUGENT, Manager, Antioch, Cal. 

Telephone Main 3, Brentwood. 



msm. 



RFD BALL BRAND. 

San Francisco Agent : A. N. GRANT, 17 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 



I \wnrded Hold Medal 
At California state 
Pair 1H»2. 

I very horse owner 
who values his St ck 
• hould con-taritly have 
i supply ot it on I and. 
it improves and keeps 
u>ck in the pli.k of ccn- 
lltion. 

Manhattan Food Co. 

Han Mateo. Cal. 

Ask your grocers or dealers for It 



Racine! Racing! 

California Jockey Club. 

OAKLAND RACE TRACK. 
Jan. 22d to Feb. 3d, incl. 

Racing MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, rain 
or thine. 

Five or More Races Each Day. 

Races start at 2:15 p. m. sharp 

Ferry b'tats leave Pan "rancuco at 12 tr. and 12:30. 
1, 1:30 2. 2:30 and 3 p. u., connecting with trains 
stopping at the entrance to the track Buy your 
ferry tickets to Shell Mound. All trains via Oak- 
land mole connec with San Pablo electric cars at 
Seventh and Broadway. Oakland: alsoall trains via 
Alameda mole connect with San Pablo electric cars 
at Fourteenth and Broad w-ty, Oakland. These 
electric cars go direct to the track In fifteen minutes. 

Returning trains leave the track at 4:15 and 4:45 
p. M. and Immediately after the last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS JR, Pres. 
R. B. MILROY, Sec'y. 



Mark Levy 

Fashionable Tailor 

For Quality, 8tyle, Fit and Excellent work un 
surpassed. 

82 1-2 deary St., San Francisco. 
Prices reasonable. Room 20. 



California Nortawestern By, 

LESSEE OF 

San Francisco & North Pacific Ry. 
The Picturesque Route 

OV CALIFORNIA. 

11 finest Flnhlnr and Hunting In California 
NUMEROUS RESORTS. 

MINERAL SPRINGS, HOT AND COLD. 

HEALTH 

PLEASURE 

RECREATION 

Tha Section tor Fruit Farms and Stocr 
Braiding. 

THl BOOTH TO 

San Rafael petaluma 

Santa Rosa, Ukiah 

And other beautiful towns. 
THE BKKT OAMPINH HROTJNDB ON 
THK CO AST, 

Ticket orncB — Corner New Montgomery » 
Market streets, nnder Palace Hotel. 
SIMIIUL Office— Mutual Life Building. 

B. X. II* AH. UeD. Pais. Agt 



Breeders' Directory. 



HOLS rKl\w- Winners ot every 7 days' butler con 
test at suite Fair 1899 1st & Zml foraged cows. 4-yr 
3 yr. and 2yr.-olds: 21 Jerseys and Irtirhams cotnpe 
ting. 5ih year my Holstelns l.ave beaten Jersevslbr 
butter stock for sale; also pigs. F. II Burke, 626 
Market St., 8. F. 



YKKBA BCKNA JKIIHKY8-The best A. J. O.C 
registered prize herd Is owned by HENRY PIERCE 
Ban Francisco. Animals for sale. 



JKRI4KY8. HOL8TBIK8 A,\n DUKIIAMS. 

Dairy stuck specially. Hegs, Poultry. Kstabllshed 
1876. William iMlen dc I n. , Los Angeles, Cal 



\V. A. 8HIPPKK, Avon. Cal., Standard-bred Trot 
ting, Carriage and Koad Horses, Jacks, Mules and 
Durham Bulls tor Hale. 



THOHOl'liHBRe D IvHHKX HOU8-Best on the 
Coast. Led. lie in en i (Seminary Park), P. O. Kast 
Oakland, Cal. 



VETERINARY. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and Stable: 605 Golden Hate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



M. R. O. V. 8., F. E. V. M. 8. 

VETERINARY 8URUBON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary Hnr 
geons, England ; Fellow of the Kdlaburg Veterinary 
Medical Society; Graduate ot the New Veterinary 
College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Surgeon to the S. F. 
Fire Department; Live Slock Inspector for New Zea- 
land and Australian Colonies at the port ot San 
Francisco; Prolessor of Equine Medicine, Veterinary 
Surgery, Veterinary Department University ol 
California; Ex-President ot the California State Vet- 
erinary Medical Association; Veterinary Infirmary, 
Residence and Office. San Francisco Veterinary Hos- 
pital ill" Oolden Gate Avenue, near Webster St.. San 
FTanclsco: Telephone West 128 



Once Used, Always Used. 




(Trade Mark Ke^tsured.) 

The greatest remedy in the world for all diseases 
ol the foot of I he horse. Best for road horses; bet 
for carriage horses: best for work horses Cures bsd 
ftet keeps good feet sound. Cheapest because it 
goes farthest and does all thst is claimed of it 

It was used all the past summer by Tom Murphy. 
CBlif.ijnia's great track shoer on the Keatir.g horse* 
that won $.'8 000 on the Grand circuit. It you see 
Murphy ask him about it. Or ask Dr. Boucher of 
Miss Logan fame; Monroe Salisbury, Chas. Durfee 
or Pete Williams. 

Tliere are Scores of Letters Like) These: 

Plymouth Hackney Stud. 

Chilton VI llk, Mass.. Nov. 20, '99. 
Harkold & Co : I beg to say that I consider 
Harold's Hoof Ointment the best I ever used. The 
champion Hackney gelding Tom Noddy had very 
brittle feet before using it and I took particular 
pains with him and gave it a fair trial with the 
most satisfactory results, for no horse could have 
belter feet than he has now. 

Tiios H. Wilson 

That's What They All Say. 

HARKOLII'S HOOF OINTMENT not only 
cares all diseases of tlm horse's foot, 
but keeps good feet ahaolutely Hound. 



PRICKS— 1'< 2 11>. box. SI; .1 lb. bucket, »2; 
5 1b. bucket, S3 , 10 1b. bucket. So, F. O. 
B. Chicago. 



Manufactured solely by 

HARROLD & CO., 

1013 Masonic Temple .- Chicago, III. 



Write lor our book "The Foot of the Horse." Sent 
free if this paper is mentioned. 
Thompson Busier, Los Angeles, agent for Southern 
California. 



Capt. Tom Merry 

Compiler of 

TABULATED PEDIGREES 

(Thoroughbred Horses Only) 

Address 534 1-2 South Spring St. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Refers to Hon. Wm. C Whitney, New York : Hon 
Perry Belmont, New Ycrk; JameB R Keene Esq., 
New York; E. S. Gardner, Jr.. Sandersvllle, Tenn. ; 
Wm. Hendrle Esq., Hamllton.Ont. 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS. 



AT STUD^ 

CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Glenheluh Jr.— Stella) 
SAM'S BOW 
(Plain Sam-I)olly Dee II) 

STOGKDALE KENNELS 

R. H. DODfiV, Manager, 

Mtukerslleld , Kern Co., Cal. 
Boarding. Pointer puppies and well broken dogs 
for sale. 



AT STUD 

Champion Guy Silk 

No. 89,168, by BEN DIQO— MAUD 8. II. 
Fee, 915.00. 
For particulars address 

PINK HILL COCKER KENNELS, 
San Anseluio, Marin Co., Cal. 



^||^^ BOOK ON 

Qp* Dog Diseases 

AND 

Ho to XT' e o cl 

Mailed Free to any address by the author 
FT. Clay Gloveb, D. V. 8., 1293 Broadway 
New York. 




Business College, 24 Post St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The most popular school on the Coast. 
E. P. HEALD, President, C. 8. HALEY, Sec'y. 
*WHend for Circulars. 



The largest and beet located sales pavilioii 
on the Pacific Coast 1 



Occidental Horse Exchange 

721 HOWARD STREET, 

Near Third - - Ban Francisco. 

Haying fitted up the above place especially for 
the sale of harness horses, vehicles, harness, etc., It 
will afford me pleasure to correspond wl'h owners 
regarding the Auction Sain* which I shall hold 
at this place EVERY TUKSnAY at 11 a. ra. 
Arrangements can be made for special sales of 
standard bred trotting stock, thoroughbreds, etc 
My turf library is the largest on this Coast, henoe 
lam prepared to compile catalogues satisfactorily 
to my natrons. I lake pleasure In referring to any 
and all for whom I have sold horses during the past 
two years. WM. O. LAYNH, 

Live Stock Auctioneer. 

Telephone Main M79. 



BLAKE, MjFMT & TOVVWE 

DEALERS IN 




65-67-59-61 First Street, 8. F. 

Trlkphonk Main 1W. 

Cocoanut Oil Cake. 

THE BEST FEED FOR STOCK, 
CHICKENS AND PIOS. 

For sale in lots to suit by 

eL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 
208 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



IT SAVES TROUBLE 

and annoyance many times to have 

ABSORBINE 

handy in case of a Bruise or 
Strain. This remedy is rapid to 
cure, pleasant to use, and Horse 
soon reiulv for work. Nobhster, 
no hair gone. 

ABSORBINE 

removes any soft 
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kind. *2.(»0 per bottle deliv- 
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W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F„ 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
Also Mfr. of TAR0LEUM 
for horBes' feet. 




64 



IJandary 27, ItOO 



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Pedigrees Tabulated 



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CATALOGUES COMPILED 

OF 

STANDARD and THORODGHDRED HORSES 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

22-24 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Vol. XXXVI. No. 5. 

No. 22^ GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1900, 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR 






DUKE AND HOLLY— A Pair that Sold for $5000. 



OUR ILLUSTRATION this week is of a noted pair of 
blue ribbon winners, Duke and Holly, driven by 
their owner Mr. A. J Nutting, of Brooklyn, New York, 
who sold them last fall to Mr. Theodore R. Hostetter, 
of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, for $5000. 1 lie half tone en- 
graving has been kindly loaned to us by the New York 
Spirit of the Times. This pair of high steppers are 
familiar to New York horse show patrons, having figured 
prominently at equine exhibitions there for several sea. 
sons. They have won many prizes and are among the 
best animals of their kind in the country. Both are 
well bred trotters; they are bay in color, stand 15.1 each 
and are as well mannered as they are well matched, 
One is by Masterlode, sire of Edward 2 :19, and the 
other by Garnet Wilkes, a son of Onward. Mr. Nutting 
purchased them about four years ago, for something 
like $2000. He entered them frequently and drove 
them himseli. He is an expert whip and their fine 
points were always shown to advantage. This picture 
will show to our readers the style of horse that is in de- 
mand in the Eastern cities and the kind that will sell 



for a high price even though they do not have speed. 
While the two horses shown have splendid conforma- 
tion, are high headed, large boned and good lookers all 
over it is not so very difficult to produce horses that are 
as good individuals if breeders will only try to breed 
them. Mr. John Parrott, proprietor of the Bay wood 
Stnd at San Mateo, has been and is producing some by 
using his Hackney stallion, Green's Rufus, on trotting 
bred mares of the proper conformation. While as well 
formed horses as those shown in the engravir g can be 
produced by the intelligent mating of suitable stallions 
and mares, they will not sell for $5000 per pair unless 
matched and educated, and this is where the true horse- 
man can show his ability and gain the profits. It takes 
at least a year to teach a pair of horses perfect manners 
so that they are suitable to hitch to a lady's carriage, 
but it pays. There is not a handsome, well matched, 
well mannered pair of carriage horses in America but 
can be sold for $2500 any day, but they are hard to find. 
Good individuals are not scarce, hut they are hard to 
match and it takes time and intelligence to school them 

Eroperly. There is food for plenty of thought for horse 
reeders who will study the above picture and the 



causes that induced a gentleman to pay $5000 for the 
pair represented. 

It was in June, 1890, that a select party joined Mr. 
Robert Bonner in a visit to Terre Haute to see Sunol in 
motion, Marvin having brought the great mare on from 
California. C. J. Hamlin, William Russell Allen, W. 
P Ijams, W. R McKeen and C. F Putnam were among 
those who held their watches when Sunol trotted a 
quarter to high wheel sulky in SI 1-6 seconds. The 
fastest previous quarter ever trotted on the same track 
was 32J.i seconds, by Axtell, when he made the three 
year old record of 2:12 which induced a syndicate to 
pay $100,000 for him Sunol attracted universal atten- 
tion in the summer of 189.0, and Gov. Stanford, who 
controlled her racing qualities, offered to trot her 
against Axtell, Belle Hamlin and others then in great 
public favor The first appearance of Sunol in the East 
was at Belmont Park Philadelphia, September 4, 1890, 
and she was greeted by an enormous crowd. 8he did 
not beat her record of 2: 1014 owing to a break, but she 
trotted the first quarter, always a slow quarter, in 30^ 
seconds. With different rating she probably would 
have beaten 2:09J^ to high wheel sulky. Her record of 
2:08W was made in her five year old form to high 
wheel.— Turf, Field and Farm. 



66 



February 3, 1900 



A GRAND 30N OF ELECTIONEER. 



Falrose 2.19, Sire of Last Year's Greatest Cali- 
fornia Money Winner. 



Although the mighty Electioneer made his reputation in 
this State, and nearly every one of the 158 of his produce 
that are in the 2:30 list were foaled in California, there are 
but few of his sons or 'grandsons standing here for public 
service for the reason that they have been eagerly snapped 
up by eastern purchasers and are now the premiers of the 
greatest stock farms across the mountains. Among the 
grandsons of the dead hero of "the tall pine" that have at- 
tracted attention during the past year by the speed shown by 
their produce, and their uniform good looks and siz9 is the 
stallion Falrose 2:19, by Fallis 2:23 one of the best bred sons 
of Electioneer. Falrose was bred by the late Count Valensin 
and on the track proved himself a game race horse getting 
his record in 1892 at San Jose in the fifth heat of a winning 
race. He had speed enough foi a record of 2.10 but changed 
hands and was retired to the stud where be is certain to 
make a name second to do other graodsoo of Electioneer if 
be has the luck to be mated with a fair average of good 
mares. A tabulation of his pedigree shows an astonishing 
number of producing stallions and mares. 



FAl.KO'E 2:19. 



IS s 

- I 
: • o : 



tO M i-* j 

&S H ; 

i 3 „ 4 

O O P 

5 11 K5 ' 

a a g j5 : 



£2.5 
P D 

c. » 
» 2 



£2 

a a 
a 9 



►so* 5 

ff£ 5 E 

j^ra 5 as 



P - S » B „ 
a -"*»S 2 p 



3 B 



ft JO — o 

aw 



£ S3 



5 5 $? — o . 



J ,.10 _ 

; - o <c n 3 



P: 3 3 3 >i • ocS 

CC^S: ; ST" 

c s j; o : : o> . 

": |a B I : o: 

o | o 3 : : ~ : 

■ r. r, : 



3 : 



gp 



ill 
II s 

5.3 



2S? 



SOS 
8 HI 



a p 



2,3 



51 

B3 



Fallis, the sire of Falrose, ha s not only sired eleven in the 
standard list, but his son Don Marvin 2:221, is the sire of 
Don Lowell 2:14$, and he the sire of Dorado 2:22$, making 
Fallis a great grandsire of race winners and showing that the 
blood breeds on. Electioneer, the grandsire of Falrose needs 
no encomiums. The records speak for him and show that be 
is atill the greatest of sires. He stands at the head of pro- 
ducing stallions with 158 in the 2:30 list, among them the 
great Arion 2:07}, Palo Alto 2:08}, and Suool 2:08}. His 
son Chimes has produced the three fastest trotters to the 
credit of one stallion viz: Fantasy 2:06, The Abbot 2:06} and 
The Monk 2:08}, and all through the champion records 
Electioneer blood is most prominent, 158 of bis sons having 
sired nearly 700 standard performers, and siity of his 
daughters being the dams of nearly 100 in the 2:30 list. 

The dam of Falrose is Roseleaf, a mare that has produced 
two with records better that 2:20 and is a full sister to Sham- 
rock 2:25 and Ivy, the dam of Hibibi 2:21. Roseleaf was by 
Buccaneer (son of Iowa Chief and Tinsley Maid) who sired 
three with standard records and the dams of Dr. Leek 2:09$, 
Daedahon 2:11, Creole 2:15 (the sire of Javelin 2:08}) and 
21 others in the standard list. Roeeleaf's dam was the famous 
mare Fernleaf that is the dam of five with records of 2:25 
or better, including Sidmont 2:10$, Gold Leaf 2:11} and 
Thistle 2:13}, the sire of To Order 2:13}. Fernleaf is by 
Flaxtail, whose daughter Mary is the only mare that ever 
lived that has produced two daughters that are the dams of 
two 2:15 performers — Letlie, the dam of Wayland W. 2:12$ 
and Welcome 2:10$, and Grace the dam of Daedalion 2:11 
and Creole 2:15. 

There is not a drop of blood in Falrose that has not proved 
to be producing blcod and it is extreme speed that is pro- 
duced by it. 

The Electioneers are noted for their size and good looks 
and the Buccaneer and Flaxtail families are also noted for 
the same qualities. Falrose himself is one of the grandest 
individuals in California. He is a dark bay and reproduces 
his color with great uniformity. Standing full 16 hands 
high and weighing 1140 pounds, his disposition is unexcelled 
and his conformation near-perfection. No living horse has 
better feet and legs and Mr. Mastin, bis owner, has adver- 
tised that service money will be refunded whenever his horse 
sires colts with curbs, spavins, ringbones or sidebones, no 
matter bow many of these defects the dams may have. This 
is a startling announcement, but shows the confidence he 
places in the prepotency of Falrose. 

One of the best looking and speediest roadsters now driven 



over the Golden Gate Park speedway in San Francisco is 
Primrose 2:13, a daughter of Falrose. The greatest money 
winner in California last year was Don 2:10, a son of Fal- 
rose, whose unfortunate death from pneumonia at Los 
Angeles last October prevented Falrose from having a Bure 
2:06 performer this season. But very few of the get of Fal- 
rose have been trained as yet, but all have shown speed and 
that his list of standard performers will be a large one is as 
certain as time. The get of Falrose are so uniformly of good 
size, good looks and style, that they invariably sell well. A 
few weeks ago John Muller, of Davisville, Yolo county, sold 
a two year old colt by Falrose for $300; a four year old un- 
trained colt brought $325 last month for shipment to Hono. 
lulu; still another two year old changed hands in Solano 
county list week for $200, and there have been numerous 
other sales at $200 and over, in every instance the colts or 
fillies beiug untrained and less than five years old. Even 
when bred to ordinary mares Falrose begets good size, good 
disposition, good color and haadsome, speedy co'ts. The 
horse breeders of Yolo county are indeed fortunate to have 
such a horse standing there at the low price of $30 the sea- 
son, and those who take advantage of the opportunity thus 
afforded should book their best mares, as the get of Falrose 
will increase in value every year and bis list of standard per- 
formers will be among those of the leading producing grand- 
sons of the great Electioneer. Falrose will make (he season 
of 1900 at the Woodland Race Track in charge of his owner, 
W. Mastin. 

Pleasanton Pick Ups. 



News From the North. 



Pleasanton, Cal., Jan. 29, 1900. 

As the weeks pass by, things are beginning to move a little 
faster at the Pleasanton track. Each day new faces are 
noted and visitors are becoming more frequent. As yet but 
little speeding is done, but now and then one can see a lively 
quarter or half stepped off. Within the coming month 
many surprises are to be sprung, and from every indication 
this year will put forth more green ones with better showings 
than any previous year. 

The report that was out and upon everyone's lips last week 
that Dick Benson had succeeded in purchasing Brice Mc- 
Neil, seems now to have beeD wrong. An offer was made to 
purchase the horse but J. Sutherland had the horse leased 
for a certain time and Mr. Benson could not secure him. 
Since then it is said that Brice McNeil has been purchased 
by Mr. Sutherland for a larger figure than Benson offered. 

Direct 2:05$ is now being given considerable road jigging 
by T. E. Keating. The little black is being daily driven 
about town bitched to a light rubber-tire buggy. His ap- 
pearance causes every eye to be turned toward him and a 
prettier turnout could not be seen. 

Millard Sander's stepped Rubato, full sister to Agitato, a 
slow mile Wednesday making the last quarter in 36 seconds- 

Chas. Durfee has refused $2100 for his Diablo colt Clipper, 
the price asked being $3000. This otter was made by Dick 
Benson for an Eastern gentleman. 

Duricg the past week Ed Laflerty reneived a fine three 
year old trotter by McKinney out of a mare by Guy Wilkes. 
This trotter came from Mr. Drake, of Farmington, and is en- 
tered in the Stanford and Occident Stakes. 

There are five three year olds now in Millard Sander's 
string that have shown a mile better than 2:40. This is but 
a sample of what is to be expected. 

Wm. Murray caused a great sensation here Friday when 
he drove a three year old Diablo filly upon the track an J be- 
gan jogging her. 

"Look at the Diablo filly," some one exclaimed, "surely 
she is going to hang up the record for the season so far, if 
she keeps that lick up. The lick was continued and as the 
filly came beneath the wire after pulling a bike cart and old 
"Diablo Bill" the entire mile, the watches showed that i t 
was made in 2:26, last quarter in 35 seconds. This filly is a 
green one by Diablo, out of Ruth C. and this is but the 
second fast work given her this year. The dam, Ruth C, 
is by Guide 2:16}, and made a mile in 2:19 in a trial heat 
when a three year old. She is surely a "chip off the old 
blocks." 

J. M. Alviso has four colts now in training, two Diablos 
and two Directs, which he claims he will put up against any 
of them and if his luck holds out he will surprise some one 
this year. 

It is expected that unless something unforeseen happens 
Rey del Diablo 2:23} will be sent East this year by J. M. 
Alviso. 

The pedigree of Search Warrant, the little son of Search- 
light 2:03}, that arrived at Ruby Hill, January 3, 1900, has 
been handed to me by Mr. C. L. Crellin, his owner, and is 
as follows: By Searchlight 2:03}, first dam Ruth C. (trial 
2:19 at three years), by Guide 2:16}; second dam San Luis 
Belle by O'Donohue, son of Gen. McClellan; third dam 
Maria Belle by Bell Aha; fourth dam Fanny Almont by 
Tilton Almont. 

Millard Sanders, who was preparing a string of well bred 
colts to be shipped to the Fasig-Tipton Sale in New York 
at the February sale, has received word from Messrs. Fasig, 
Tipton & Co. to hold off shipping till the May sale at Cleve- 
land, Ohio. This he has decided to do and will, during the 
mean time, further develop them for the May sale. 

Cobb. 



[Portland Rural Spirit.] 
W. D. Connell of Deer Island has Bent his promising three 
year old trotter by Scarlet Letter out of Flora T., the dam of 
Island Lass 2:20, to Sam Casto to be educated in the art oi 
trotting. 

Mr. Erickson has brought down from his farm in Clacks- 
mas county bis stallions Claymont and Senator, also the 
sweet little pacer Alta Cora, full sister to Claymont, Chehalis, 
Del Norte, etc., and placed them in Sam Casto's hands for 
the season. Both Claymont and Senator will be placed in 
the stud this Bpring and conditioned for the fall racing. 

Thoe. S. Griffi h of Spokane bought and snipped ibis week 
from John Pender the well known trotting mare Helen J. 
2:18$ Mr. Pender brought this mare to Oregon about two 
years ago from Los Angeles, Cal. She then had a record of 
2:22$ and has since reduced it to 2:18$. She has raced very 
successfully on our Northern circuit and is considered one of 
the best mares in her class on the coast. We understand 
Mr. Griffith is buying her for matinee racing and some one 
will have to pay a long price if they buy anything that can 
beat her 

The Van de Vanter Stock Farm has purchased from the 
Eirkendall estate, Helena, Mont., the high bred stallion 
Erect, full brother to Direct 2:05}, and will place him in the 
stud at Irvington Park this season. Erect arrived here in 
good shape this week, and should be well patronized, for be 
is an out cross of high claes that should nick well with our 
Oregon mares, especially the Altamont blood. 

F. M. Barrows, owner of Del Norte, writes us that by 
many requests from Walla Walla he has decided to make a 
season there this year with Del Norte instead of the Willam- 
ette valley. 

J. W. Tilden has decided to consign bis horses to the 
8plan-Newgass sale in Chicago, including Ella T. 2:08}, and 
the Scarlet Letter mare Hester that he pronounces a very 
promising trotter. 

C. B. Williams baa placed his Scarlet Letter filly, Kate 
Abraham, out of a mare by Prompter, son of Bull Bull, in 
the hands of Sam Casto at Irvington track. This filly is a 
natural pacer and a very promising one. 

J. E. Reeves, of Cornelious, was in this week and reports 
his horses all wintering well. Beulah, by Altamont, is due 
to foal to McKinney 2:11}, in Apr-1. His Alexis filly out of 
Beulah is also in foal to Capt. Jones. Mr. Reeves says he 
will breed Beulah and his other three mares to Erect this 
season. 

The Vancouver B. C. Jockey Club announced the dates of 
May 24 to 26th for their spring meeting and July 2d and 3d 
for their summ er Meeting and Sept. 1st, 3d and 4th for their 
all meeting. 

Elevator 2:30 Is by Don Marvin. 



Woodlind, Cal., January 29, 1900. 
Editob Breeder and Sportsman:— I see by an article 
in the last issue of your paper, written by Mr. Charles A, 
Willis in regard to the Stanford Stakes of 1899, in which he 
refers to Elevator, one of the starters, as being "a bay filly 
by Iran Alto." Now, Elevator is a black filly sired by Don 
Marvin. I gave Elevator her record of 2:30 in a second 
heat last year on the 4 h of July, on the half-mile track at 
Rocklin. The turns of this track are not thrown up, but I 
could have driven her much faster that day over it than any 
heat was trotted in the Stanford Stake. I would like to have 
you correct the mistake Mr. Willis has made in regard to 
the color and breeding of Elevator, as I own Don Marvin 
and am making a season with him here and have already 
been told by a party that Elevator is not by him. 

Yours respectfully, 

W. Mastin. 

[Elevator 2:30 is by Don Marvin and is so given on the 
record books and in the 2:30 list as published in all the 
papers. The Breeder and Sportsman has always given 
the mare as by Don Marvin. Mr. Willis no doubt made the 
misiake of crediting her to Iran Alto inadvertently and 
probably through getting her breeding confounded with that 
of the winner of the stake, Dr. Frasse's Sister, who is by Iran 
Alto, and it was overlooked by us.— Ed. B. & 8.] 



Answers to Correspondents. 



P. C. B., Nevada City — 1. Did Norfolk ever run a four 
miles or four miles and repeat race against Lcdi, or any horse 
in California or anywhere else? 2 Did Killarney, the pac- 
ing stallion, pace in 2:18 in a race at Stockton ? 3. Is it no 1 
a fact that bis best race record is 2:20$, made at Glenbrook' 
Nevada county ? 

Answer— 1. No. 2. No. 3. Yes. 

A. W., Arroyo Grande. Erwin Davis 6558 was a bay horse 
foaled in 1865, and was by Skenandoah 926, out of Lost 
Diamond, by Harris' Hambletonian. He sired Carrie F. 
2:27} and Ed 2:26, and his daughters produced Florence R. 
2:16} and Electroid 2:28}. He was owned for many years by 
C. 8. Crittendon, of this city, who could give you any infor- 
mation you desire about the horse. Wine Creek Black 
Hawk was by Vermont Black Hawk, dam by Young Sir 
Walter, grandam by 8ir Charles, son of Duroc, and great 
grandam a Morgan mare. 

D. F., Sacramento — We have no record of the best per- 
formances of horses drawing a ton weight. The performance 
of French Monarch in which he pulled 2000 a mile in ten 
minutes and three seconds is certainly an excellent one. 



February 3, 1900] 



67 



BOODLE 2:12 1-2 



Possesses All the Qualifications Desired in a 
Sire of Harness Horses. 



"Boodle is destined to be a great eire of speed," said Dick 
Benson, the well known Kansas City horseman, the other 
day when looking him over, and he added that "the good 
looks, size and style of the get of this son of Stranger will 
bring the top prices in the Eastern market." Mr. Benson had 
reasons to back his assertion as it is but a short time since 
Valentine 2:30 was sold to a Cleveland gentleman for (2500, 
and the Nutwood Wilkes unbroken yearlicg that was pur- 
chased by Dan Mahaiiey for $1000 was out of a Boodle mare. 

It will pay anyone who has never looked Boodle over to 
make a trip to San Jose and do so. All one has to do when 
arriving in the Garden City is to ask for "Farmer Bunch,'' 
and he will be directed to the track without further ado, as 
everybody knows Bunch and are aware of the fact that be 
has charge of this stallion. Boodle was a race horse and 
never found a race too long for him. His record of 2:12£ is 
evidence that he has speed, and as it was made in the second 
neat of a race which he won in three straight heats, trotting 
them all in 2:15 or better, it is not cf the tic-cup, shooed-in 
variety, bat an honest race record. 

Boodle's pedigree is worth studying, as the following 
tabulation will show : 



[Geo. Washington 1161. 



. f Stranger 3030.. ..-< 



I 

(.Goldsmith Maid 2:14. 



3 



Bride. 



| Jay Gould.. 
■< 



i.Tidy.. 



( Gen. Knox 
(.Lady Thorn 2:18^ 

Abdallah 15 

Old Ab by Abdallah 1 

r Hambletonian 10 
( Lady Sanford 
c Ethan Allen 43 
I Dau. of Abdallah 1 



Stranger, the pire of Boodle, was picked out a few year B 
ago by Australian buyers and purchased at a big price to 
head one of the leading breeding farms in Europe. The 
Europeans want horses that have size and style, sound limbs 
and good conformation as well as speed and they selected 
Stranger because bis produce suits tbem, and all his get are 
trotters. Before leaving America Stranger sired 32 in the 
2:30 trotting list, among them Col. KuBer 2:1 1 J, who was 
also sold in Europe and has since reduced his record to 2:09}, 
Ballona 2:11$, Boodle 2:12£, Cibolla 2:14}, Broomal 2:15, 
Hazel Dell 2:15 and many other fast race winners. Stranger's 
aire was Gen. Washington who sired 15 standard trotters, 
has eight sons that have sired 50 in the 2 30 list, and nine 
daughters that have produced 14 with standard speed, and 
of these but four are pacers and they were from pacing dams. 
The sire of Gen. Washington was Gen. Knox, sire of 18 
trotters, 32 sons that produced 79 trotters and 10 pacers, and 
31 daughters that produced 35 trotters and 11 pacers. Gen. 
Washington's dam was the famous champion Lady Thome 
2:18}, full sister to Mambrino Patchen." 

The dam of Stranger was the celebrated race mare Gold, 
smith Maid 2:14, whose name is a household word wherever 
the American trotting horse is known. She trotted mere 
heats in 2:30 than any hese that ever rtced and was the 
greatest trotter of her day and there are those who will yet 
clcim that she was the fastest trotter that ever lived when 
the tracks, sulkies, etc , of her day are considered. She was 
by Abdallah 15, whose descendants in the 2:30 list number 
thousands, and her dam was by Abdallah 1, the sire of 
Hambletonian 10 These are Boodle's top crosse3, and there 
is nothing but producing and racing trotting blood in them- 

Boodle's dam, Bride, is not only the dam of Boodle 2:12£, 
but also of Begum 2:27}. She is by Jay Gould 2:21 J, a 
great race horse acd the sire of Pixley 2:08} and 30 others 
in the standard list, with sixteen sires that have produced 40 
in the list, and 34 daughters who are the dams of 65 standard 
performers. Jay Gould was a son of Hambletonian 10, the 
great founder of the American trotting family, and his dam 
was Lady Sanford by American Star 14, the next dam a 
grandaughter of the great race horse, American Eclipse. 

Tidy, the dam of Bride and second dam of Boodle, was a 
daughter of Ethan Allen 43, snd out of a daughter of Ab- 
dallah 1. Ethan Allen was another of the great pioneer 
trotters and had a record of 2:25.1. He was a son of Black 
Hawk 5, and produced six standard trotters, 22 of his sons 
sired 93 standard trotters and 3 atandard pacers, while 18 of 
his daughters are the dams of 21 trotters and 2 pacers with 
standard speed. The preponderance of trotters among the 
many standard performers enumerated above is remarkable 
and shows the wonderful prepotency of the families from 
which Boodle descends. 

In the stod Boodle has had but limited opportunities and 
the number of mares bred to him has never been large, owing 
to the fact that he has been limited to a few mares each 
spring and generally raced in the summer and fall. Last 
year he trotted a mile separately timed in a race in 2:12$, 
which shows that he still has all his speed. His daughter, 
Ethel Downs 2:10, was one of the gamest and fastest race 
mares that ever trotted in California and would have surely 
lowered her record had she lived. Thompson 2:14J is another 
of his produce that has trotted many long drawn out race 8 
and won by sheer gameness lrom horses that had more speed 



than be. Valentine, another son of Boodle, took a two year 
old record of 2:30 and was sold last year to Mr. H. K. Dev- 
ereaux of Cleveland, Ohio, for $2500, and is now considered 
one of the grandest lookers owned in the celebrated matine 
club of that city and is touted there as a 2:12 performer for 
this year. The get of Boodle possess all the attributes of 
high class road horses and game trotters. They are very 
intelligent, solid bays, browns or blacks, have magnificent 
style and conformation, good size, feet and legs like iron, 
bold high action, short backs and constitutions that seem able 
to stand anything, and all have those necessary appendages 
to a really handsome horse — beautiful manes and tails. 
Those who own horses with Boodle blood are aware of their 
value and always demand and get good prices for them- 
Those who are breeding for size and style as well as speed 
should write to Farmer Bunch and book their mares before 
Boodlu's book is full, as the son of Stranger may make another 
campaign this year if there are good purses hung up for the 
classes to which he is eligible. 



Golden Gate Park Driving Association. 



A Distlnguished^Visitor. 



Baron Herman, member of the German legation at Wash, 
ington, has been commissioned b? his government to make 
an extended tour of America with the object of inspecting 
our most prominent breeding farms, sale marts, etc , and 
officially reporting the information collected concerning them 
to the home government at Berlin. Germany has become 
deeply interested in American horses and horse breeding;, 
and while her attitude during the past few years has been at 
times distinctly unfriendly toward the American horse and 
the ascendency which be has gained in the empire of the 
Kaiser, Baron Herman's mission is evidence that the un- 
wisdom of this position has been realized. The Baron is a 
polished gentle i an and a thorough horseman, and in the 
course of a recent visit to the Review office he explained 
that bis tour of inspection embraced all breeds of horses and 
was intended to be comprehensive in its scope. We are sure 
that all breeders will be glad to meet him and will afford 
him all possible facilities for the successful accomplishment 
of his object. It is nearly twenty years since Baron Faveror 
made a similar tour of America in behalf of the French 
government, which resulted in much good to our equine 
trade with France. We hope that Baron Herman' visit 
may be equally fruitful in its influence upon our export trade 
with Germany. 

With the passage of every day the immense vista of the 
foreign market for American horses opens out before us 
The demand is steadily increasing and, with the present 
avowed scarcity to meet our own local wants, the encourage" 
ment to the American breeder becomes steadily greater. Our 
facilities for the production of the best horses of all grades or 
types are unequalled upon the whole face of the globe, and 
as time lapses the truth of this statement is becoming gen- 
erally accepted and is causing the entire horse-buying world 
to turn toward America as the greatest source of supply for 
its needs. It will be our own fault if we do not improve thi B 
opportunity to the utmost. — Horse Review. 



O. W. Williams Buys Stallions. 



Telegraph ; c dispatches from Lexington, Ky., are to the 
effect that C. W. William's, Gilesburg, 111., proposes to go 
into the stallion business in his usual thorough manner this 
coming spring. It was for Mr. Williams that Bowerman 
Bros, bought the stallion Belsire 2:21}, a few weeks ago 
from Miller & 8ibley, Franklin, Pa., and in addition to that 
horse Mr. Williams has lately acquired St. Vincent 2:13|, 
sire of Lord Vincent 2:08$, winner of the last Transylvanian 
Stake; Mazitlan 2:26], from Allen farm, Pittsfield, Mass , 
and Expedition 2:15$, the crack trotter ; lately owned by 
Woodbury farm an I considered in the blue grass to be one 
of the best of the young stallions alive at this day. With 
five such stallions as Allerton 2:09}, by Geo. Wilkes; Expe- 
dition 2:15$, by Electioneer; 8t. Vincent 2:13£, by WilkeB 
Boy; Belsire 2:21}, by Electioneer; and Mazitlao 2:26$, by 
Klectioneer, Mr. Williams ought to do a tremenduous busi- 
ness this spring, and that so astute a business man and suc- 
cessful as he should go so largely into the game proves that 
the prospects are very bright for stallion owners this year. 
It stands to reason that Mr. Williams would not have gone 
into the business so largely unless be had received positive 
assurance that he would get so much patronage anyway, for 
none of the horses he has bought is a cheap one by any 
means, and for Belsire he put down five thousand of the good 
cold dollars that come so hard. 

These five stallions, with the few broodmares he owns, Mr. 
Williams will locate at the old Ashland park stock farm 
made famous by the late Barney Treacy. This is one of the 
best, if not the best, equipped stock farms near Lexington, 
and it looks as though Mr. Williams intended to shake the 
Galesburg dust from off his shoes — Chicago Horseman. 



Kendall's Spavin Cure. 



Holstew, Iowa, Feb. 19, 1898. 

in: B. J. Kbndall Co.: 

Dear Sire— PI en Be send me one of your Treatise on the Horse. I 
have a mare that bad a RINGBONE. I used one bottle of your 
Kendall's 8pavin Cure, after I used It two weeks my horse got well. 
1 think It is lbe beet medicine in the world for horses. 

Your* truly, Gustave Paulsen. 



At the last meeting of this active and energetic organiza 
tion, a new constitution and by-laws were adopted and step a 
taken to make the matinee season of 1900 the beet ever given 
in this city. Nothing hap done more to make road driving 
popular in this city than the meetings given by this associa- 
tion and it is expected that the matinee on May 30th, which 
is to be held at the Oakland track, will see the biggest list of 
starters and the largest attendance in the history of the club' 

At the meeting held at the rooms of the club in the Palace 
Ho'el last Tuesday evening, nominations for a new board of 
eleven directors were made. Theie were 20 nominations as 
follows, out of which a board of eleven members is to be 
chosen by ballot at the next regular meeting: J. C. Kirk- 
patrick, E. Stewart, D. L. Hackett, J. C. Ohlandt, Edward 
Aigeltinger, A. B. 8preckels, Harry Patrick, G. Sweet, Sid- 
ney Smith, Frank G. O'Kane, Dr. L Miller, D. C. Ham- 
mond, C. F. Hanlon, C. F. Kapp, E. Cerciat, Chas. Newman, 
F. W. Thompson, Ira B. Dalzell, L. Richardson and W. 
Hammerton. 

The next meeting will be held on Tuesday evening, 
February 13th, and will probably be (he best attended busi- 
ness meeting ever held by the association. 

Paidooks for Stallions. 



In building stallion paddocks, like doing most other things' 
there is a right way and a wrong way. Many men, and, in- 
deed, some pretty good horsemen, seem to think that it is 
unsafe to allow a stallion to see other horses at all, lest he 
should break over all barriers and make trouble, and to avoid 
'bis, if they build a paddock at all, they enclose it with a 
high and perfectly tight board fence, so high and so tight 
that the stallion can neither see over it or thiough it. A 
graver error could scarcely be committed by any stallion 
owner. The very thing which makes stallions restless, fret- 
ful and ill-tempered is secluded confinement — "solitary con- 
finement," if you please. 

Nothing else so irritates a stallion as hearing and smell- 
ing other horses which they cannot see. Allow a stallion 
plenty of associates, at least "distant acquaintances," and he 
will be about as well contented as any other horse. Give 
him a paddock, inclosed by an open fence — open enough for 
him to see everything that comes near him, and there will 
be no mad rearing and plunging because he knows there are 
horses somewhere near but which he cannot see. 

Stallions need no more be treated like wild beasts than 
mothers-in-law need be treated as naturally and necessarily 
meddlesome and trouble-making: Kindness and judicious 
treatment will usually make either very companionable. — 
Western Horseman. 

At Rulnart Stock Faim. 



We wish to call the attention of those who will breed 
thoroughbred mares this year to the advertisement of the 
Australian horse Tarcoola, now standing for service at Ruin- 
art Stock Farm in Sonoma county. He was the winner o 
the Melbourne Cup in 1893, the Williamstown Cup, Queen's 
Birthday Handicap, Anniversary Stakes, etc., and is now 
thoroughly acclimated. He is better bred for a sire, accord- 
ing to the Bruce Lowe system, than probably any horse in 
the world, being by Newminster (3), from Imogene, by King 
of the Ring (8), with little but "sire blood" in the first four 
removes, having two crosses of Stockwell (3), Leaming- 
ton (14), Ace of Clubs (8), Touchstone (14), Faugh-a" 
Ballagh (11), Newminster (English) (8) and Flying Dutch 
man (3). He is himself a No. 12, the line of Lexington 
Salvator, Luke Blackburn, Grinstead and other track cele. 
brities. Tarcoola is a "big-little" horse, standing a shade 
under 15.2, yet weighing close to 1300 pounds. A three yea r 
old by him recently took first prize at the Ballarat Horse 
Show against twenty odd competitors. He is spoken of by 
the Australasi an as "the even-shaped, sound-constitutioned 
Tarcoolo." Among other things said about him by one of 
the leading turf writers on that paper is the following : "This 
same Tarcoola is an old and dear friend of mine, whose stud 
future I will watch with the same interest I took in his (ur 
doings, acd I only trust that my money will be cared for by 
his sons and daughters as it was by their honest cast-iron 
dad. Tarcoola comes from a sire line that is here to stay. 
Staying and sire lines remind roe of the number of grea 
slayers Newminster got, acd also of the great value of this 
beautiful blood in a pedigree." Then he goes on into the 
intricacies of the Lowe system at a great length, and pre- 
dicts a great stud future for the Melbourne Cup hero of 1893. 
At the same farm the stallion* Ruinart and Primrose wilj 
also make a season. 

Satsuma, who will be offered at the auction of Dr. 
Rowell's horses at Oakland, February 9th, won the Burns 
Handicap in 1898, running the mile and a quarter with 122 
pounds up in 2:074 He has won at all distances from five 
furlongs to a mile and a quarter and holds the Pacific Coast 
record for six furlongs in 1:12 J. He has won over $20,000 
in purses and stakes in California within the last three years. 



Asian showed improvement over the form previously dis- 
played by him and won as he pleased at six furlongs. On 
his breeding Asian should prove a good one, being by Gold- 
finch from Lydia, a Bister in blood to The Butterflies and full 
sister to the famous Barnes and Runnymede. 



68 



©ije greener cmfc gftwetatnmu 



[Februaey 3, 1900 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F W. KELLEY, PBOPBIBTOB. 

m 

The Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

22 1-2 GEARY STREET, San Francisco. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 



Termi-One Year 83, Six Months SI. 75, Three Months SI. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addreased to F. W. Kelley. 22% Geary St. Han Francisco, Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writers name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee of 
good faith. 

San Prancisoo, Saturday, February 3, 1900. 



Dates Claimed. 

COLUSA July 2Sd to 28th. 

WILL0W8 July 30th to Aug. 4th. 

RED BLUFF Au 8 6tQ t0 luh - 

CHICO Ang 13th to 18th. 

MARY9VILLE Aug 20th to 25th. 

WOODLAND Aug. 27th to 8ept. 1st, 

STATE FAIR, Sacramento Sept. 2d to Sept 15th. 

Stallions Advertised. 

TROTTERS AND FACERS. 

ALTAMON T 3600 M. Nelson, Alameda. Cal. 

ARTHUR W 2:1H$ J. M Nelson, Alameda. Cal. 

BAY-WATER WILKES H. Hoy, Winters, Cal. 

BOODLE 2:12K c - F Bunch, Sen Jose. 

CHARLES DKRBY 4907 Oakwood Stock Farm, Danville, Cal 

DICTATU3 2:19Vi Clarence Day, 2619 Central Ave., Alumcda, Cal. 

DIABLO 2:09V 4 Win. Murray, Pleasanton, Cal. 

DIRECT 2:05% Thomas E. Keating, Pleasanton. Cal. 

FALROSE 2:19 W. Masten, Woodlaud. 

GAFF TOPSAIL 2:17Uj Edw. Kavanagh, Valli jo, Csl. 

HAMBLETONI AN WILKES 1679. ..R. I. Moorhead. Santa Clara, Cal. 

McKINNEY 2:1)W C. A. Durfee. Pleasanton, Cal. 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16^ Martin Carter, Irvington- 

OWYHEE 26.116 Oakwood Stock Farm, Danville, Cal. 

THOROUGHBREDS. 
TARCOOLA) - 

1'RIVIROSES Ruiuart Stock Fa'm, 

RUIN ART ) Beltane, Cal. 

HACKNEYS. 

GREEN'S RUFUS Baywnod Stud. San Mateo 



DISTRICT FAIR DIRECTORS should realize that 
they have the important duly to perform this year of 
trying to make their fairs and race meetings successful 
from every point of view. Because some oi the fairs 
held in California in former years have not been very 
creditable expositions of the products of the locality in 
which they were given is no reason why the fairs of 1900 
should be like them. Everyone realizes that there it a 
great deal of hard and thankless work in the management 
of a district fair, but if started right and the proper per- 
sons placed in charge, expositions can be given that will 
redound to the credit of all concerned and be of great 
benefit to the district and people therein. The State has 
voted money to the agricultural districts for the purpose 
of aiding these annual »hows for several reasons. One 
is that a well arranged display of the best products of 
the district will be an object lesson as to its resources 
and by showing what can be accomplished by intelligent 
industry, elevate the standard of all products. Another 
is that better farm products bring higher prices, and 
higher prices bring more profit and therefore more of 
the luxuries of life to the producer and make him more 
contented and a better citizen. Highly productive soil 
makes smaller farms, closer neighbors, oetter roads, 
more and better schools and leads to an advanced civili- 
zation. The district boards of directors should take all 
these things into consideration, and so manage the an- 
nual fair that it will be of vast benefit to the district. It 
should be the annual gathering of the people where op- 
portunity is given all to see what has been accomplished 
by the district in the past and what is the best to do in 
the future. As far back as the memory of any living 
American runneth the county fair has been the occasion 
when speed contests between horses have been up for 
annual decision. The good old custom yet prevails and 
though in late years there have been innovations that 
have detracted from the enjoyment of these contests, 
they can easily be remedied and the races made as en- 
joyable as in former years. The races are the amuse- 
ment portion of the fair program and are held in high 
esteem by the Deople. Speed in a horse is a great de- 
sideratum when a price is to be obtained for him. It can 
only be tested by actual racing, and the fair ground is 



the court wherein is decided the supremacy of the breeds. 
Having provided a first class fair and stock exhibit the 
directors should provide a first class speed program and 
see to it that it is carried out in a first class manner. 
To accomplish this they should offer as large purses as 
they possibly can, always remembering that the more 
libera', the purses the more numerous the entries and 
therefore the smaller will the cost be to the association. 
A good racing program will require competent men in 
the judges stand and prompt and efficient officials in 
charpe of everything. That modern innovation on race 
tracks in this country, the bookmaker, should not be 
permitted to ply his vocation at district fairs no matter 
how liberal his offer for the privilege. The more he 
pays the fewer horses will be honestly driven. Provide 
auction or mutual pools for those who like to wager a 
few dollars on their favorite, but try to make the gate a 
larger source of revenue than the betting privilege. In- 
duce the people to attend your fair by convincing them 
that it will be well worth their while to do so. Give 
them a good display of products of farm, field and fac- 
tory, provide a live stock display that will be high class 
and instructive, arrange for each afternoon a program of 
good speed contests, see to it that they are honestly car- 
aied out and the district fair will again be what it was 
intended, and the State's lawmakers will feel more in- 
clined to increase the appropriations for them instead of 
cutting them down^ 

THE BREEDING SEASON has begun in California 
with every prospect of three times the business being 
done that was transacted last year. The owners f f 
mares need have no fears of its being overdone, as there 
are not enough individually good and well bred mares 
and stallions left in California to supply the demand that 
will exist three years from now were they all mated this 
spring. It must be borne in mind, however, that poorly 
formed and poorly bred animals of any kind are not 
now and never will be in demand sufficient to make 
their raising profitable. The ^pply of good horses is 
about exhausted. Buyers from the East and Europe are 
now in California and are unable to find all the devel- 
oped horses they want at any price. This state of affairs 
is not a temporary one, but is certain to continue. There 
has been a tremendous weeding out in the breeding 
ranks during the past four years, and although there are 
too many weeds still remaining, not half enough good 
broodmares are left in the State to supply the demand 
for good young horses that will be wanted during the 
next five years were every one of them to be bred regu- 
larly during that time. The reports from Chicago. New 
York and other horse selling centres are all alike. Good 
horses are ready sale at good prices. The Europeans 
want more than they can find High class carriage and 
draft horses are scarce. Good trotting prospects are 
eagerly sought after and the price for a top notcher is 
unlimited. Pacers are not quite so much in demand but 
a good one will sell readily at a high figure. Those who 
own broodmares or good fillies should take advantage of 
the occasion and book them to the best available 
stallions. Read the paper read by Col. Exall of Dallas, 
Texas, belore the National Live Slock Association at its 
Forth Worth convention last month and printed in 
another part of this issue. There are no better posted, 
more successful or more conservative men than he and 
his words are worth heeding. There are standing for 
service in California this year some of the best stallions 
in America. Any man with intelligence who has given 
the subject of horse breeding any consideration at all can 
find among our advertised stallions horses that, will pro- 
duce profitable colts if mated with his mares, and we 
commend our columns to our readers, knowing that 
there is not an inferior horse there mentioned. The 
upward tendency of the horse market will continue for 
several years. Now is the time to take advantage of it. 



vide for the greatest number. The Breeder and 
Sportsman, desiring to do everything in its power to 
assist the associations and the horsemen alike, has 
arranged the blank in question and asks every harness 
horse owner and trainer on the Coast to fill it out in 
accordance with the instructions therein printed and 
mail the same to this office. State what classes will suit 
you best for the trotters and pacers and give the number 
of horses you have in training. This information will 
be of inestimable value to the secretaries of the State 
Agricultural Society, the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders' Association and the various district boards 
and will enable them to prepare purses that have a cer- 
tainty of filling and therefore to offer generous purses 
for the same. The more entries there are in sight the 
more money will be hung up, and the more successful 
will the summer racing season be. Read the blank 
over, fill it out carefully and send it to the Breeder 
and Sportsman office as soon as possible. A general 
response from horsemen will result in much good to all 
concerned. 



THE ATTENTION of trainers and the owners of 
horses in training is called to a blank printed on the 
opposite page which they are requested to fill out and 
forward to this office. The secretaries of the different 
district and other associations in California always find 
one of the greatest difficulties in arranging a program to 
be a lack of knowledge of the horses in training, and it 
often happens that the classes which are expected to get 
the largest number of entries secure less than sufficient 
to fill them, while those which were considered to have 
but little chance of filling will receive overflowing en- 
tries. On this Coast the training grounds are scattered 
from Los Angeles to Seattle and it is very difficult for the 
secretaries of associations to form any idea of the num- 
ber of horses in training and the classes that will pro- 



THE NORTHERN CIRCUIT of District Fairs will 
probably furnish seven weeks of harness racing prior to 
the opening of the State Fair at Sacramento, as it is 
now almost certain that meetings will be held at Redding, 
Red Bluff, Chico, Colusa, Willows, Marysville and 
Woodland, which will necessitate the opening meeting 
to take its dates in the week beginning July 15th. If 
meetings are held in the Napa, Sonoma and Solano dis- 
tricts and they desire to hold them before the State Fair, 
there may be a conflict of dates, and the Breeder and 
Sportsman offers the suggestion that all the above ten 
districts can easily get together and effect amicable 
arrangements that will be of benefit to all concerned. 
The idea so prevalent in some of the districts that 
June and July are too early for fair and race meet- 
ings is an erroneous one, as it is almost invari- 
ably the case that there are larger fields of entries at 
the earlier meetings, better attendance at the tracks 
and more satisfaction all around than is the case 
when they are held during the fall months. The 
first of July is not too early to begin raring in Cali- 
fornia, and the association that can include the "glorious 
Fourth" in its dates will gather in heavier gate receipts 
than can be had on any other week in the year. There 
is no reason why the Northern Circuit of fairs cannot 
consist of ten meetings instead of seven with dates all 
amicably arranged so that there will be no "doubling 
back" on the railroads. The dates selected by the 
six associations that have already claimed their dates 
can hardly be improved upon as they stand, and other 
districts north of the bay that desire to enter the circuit 
should precede these meetings. 



THE TROTTING HORSE is again the fashionable 
horse of America and wealthy citizens all through the 
East are investing in them. It is said that a dozen new 
stock farms for the breeding of trotters have been estab- 
lished in Kentucky alone during the past three months 
and all are backed by plenty of capital. The best feature 
of this revival of a great industry is the fact that the 
men who are investing their money are spending it for 
quality instead of quantity and there is no fear that these 
farms will overstock the market. One well known stal- 
lion owner, who has made a wonderful success with his 
horse, now insists that the horse shall not be mated with 
a mare in the future unless her first, second and third 
dams are high class; they must be producers or from pro- 
ducing families on both sides clear through. It will te 
readily seen that the produce of this breeder's stal- 
lion will not be numerous, but they will be valuable 
which is better. Other breeders are following in the 
same line. The owners of high class stallions are no 
longer willing to breed them to anything that comes 
along and the result cannot help being a vast improve- 
ment in the horses of the future. The prices of good 
horses are advancing all the time but the culling process 
is going on just the same on those farms where good 
business principles, thought, intelligence and good judg- 
ment are used. The American trotter is to-day the best 
all round horse in the word, but he has not reached the 
acme of his development by considerable. 



INOCULATION against glanders is being performed 
on every horse and mule shipped to the Philippines or 
Hawaii from this port by the United States Army, as a 
possible preventive against glanders. The system of vac- 
cination was adopted some time since in the army and 
every horse must now be vaccinated or as the veteriDaries 
term it, malleined, before shipment. The operation 



February 3, 1900J 



9 



which is a very simple one, may be witnessed almost any 
day at the Presidio, where an army veterinary puts the 
animals through the process which shall make them proo 
against the disease most dreaded by horsemen, and forf 
which there has never yet been discovered a cure. The 
discovery of malleine, which appears to possess such 
magical properties, was discovered in the same manner 
as other toxines, the microbe that produces glanders 
being discovered and afterwards isolated, and the result- 
ing toxine being christened by the name quoted. Inoc- 
ulation is performed with a large hypodermic syringe, 
so adjusted that if the horse kicks under the operation 
it will conform to his movements. So far the process 
seems to have been effective, no case of glanders having 
been reported from any equine patient. 



Reminiscent. 



DR. ROWELL has decided to sell a number of his 
horses in training as he has so many two year olds com. 
ing on, and has engaged the leading auctioneers Chase 
& Mendenhall to dispose of them in the paddock at Oak- 
land track Friday, February 9th. The horses to be sold 
include that grand race horse Satsuma, one of the best 
individuals in America, and a horse that should make a 
good sire. Dr. Bernays, Tom Cromwell, Whitcomb and 
other good ODes are to be offered at this sale and it will 
afford buyers a chance to get horses that can win money 
right away as all are in actual training. 



Racing at Burlingame. 



The Burlingame Country Club will celebrate Washington's 
Birthday by having some amateur races at the Hobart track 
on that day. There wi'l be six events in all and in each the 
weight for riders will be 165 pounds or over. The entries 
will close February 6th with the secretarv of the club at 
Burlingame All communications must be forwarded to the 
secretary before February 15th. The rules of the Pacific 
Coast Pony Racing and Steeplechase Association will govern. 
All polo ponies must be at the club stables at 10 a. m. on the 
day of the races to be measured or they will be difqualified. 
Owners of polo ponies must present certificates from the 
polo committees. The events will be as follows: 

First — Quarter of a mile for polo ponies. 

Second — Half mile for race ponies. 

Third — Three-quarter mile for carriage horses to be trotted 
under saddle. 

Fourth — Pony polo steeplechase for the Due d'Abbruzzi 
cop; distance, about two miles; open only to polo ponies 
which have a certificate from the polo committee. No pro- 
fessional will be allowed to ride. 

Fifth — Five-eighths of a mile flit for race ponies. 

Sixth — Point to point, pink coat steeplechase; about four 
miles. 

The gentlemen who will officiate at the meeting will be as 
follows: Stewards, George A. Newball, Major J. L. Rath- 
bone, P. P. Eyre, F. J. Carolan, W. S. Hobart, E. D Baylard; 
timer, F. 8. Moody; judge, J. B. Crockett; official scorer, R. 
M. Tobin; starter, J. 8. Tobin; clerk of course, T. F. 
Meagher. 

C. W. Williams, the Galesburg horseman, recently said 
in an intervi ew: "I sold all my broodmares except eleven 
but expect to buy more. Of course, the mares I want are 
hard to find, and even when discovered are not always for 
■ale. My idea is that every foal by Allerton shall have three 
or four good mares in its maternal pedigree — not one — and 1 
don't want to breed to any other kind. It is in order to 
secure this sort of mares that I have sent Allerton to Ken- 
tucky two seasons, and I shall probably have him there in 
1900. The mares are bred on shares, and when the foals are 
yearlings they are all brought to Lexington on a specified 
day. I look each one over carefully, and then we have a 
blind ballot, the owner of each mare writing on a slip of paper 
the amount he is willing to give for my half of the foal, 
while I write on another slip what I will pay for his half. 
The man making the highest bid, of course, gets the colt, and 
I think so much of the A Mortons that they generally fall to 
me. Ju?t where I shall locate has not been decided, but a 
removal from Galesburg is certain. My plan will simply be 
to keep a band of select broodmares, sell the yearlings every 
fall, and let other people develop them and profit by en 
hanced values." 

Among the guests at the Palace is Max Gross of Berlin, 
Germany, who is known throughout Europe as an importer 
and trainer of horses. During the last five years he has iro. 
ported 401 highly bred horses into Germany from this 
country and is now on the Coast to make some extensive 
purchases. To this end he expects to visit the Palo Alto 
and Ffnggin ranchos during the next few rlnvs. 



Regarding the famous race at Kalamazoo, Mich , in 1859, 
when Flora Temple tooK her record of 2:19:}, veteran George 
P. Floyd, one of the few eye-witnesses of the event, writes 
the American Horse Breeder: 

There are some circumstances connected with that race 
that I have never seen in print, although the race was talked 
about for years afterward. I witnessed the race and remem" 
ber the circumstances as well as though it were but yesterday. 
Flora Temple's record was 2:22 before sbe trotted that race. 
McMann drove Flora, Jim Eoff drove Princess and John 
Eyclesbeimer drove Honest Anse. Jim Euff was "oil from 
de can." He was a tough cuss and a great master of hum- 
bug. He would like awake nights trying to study up some 
kind of a scheme to beat the boys. 

Flora Temple won the first heat of this race in 2:32}. In 
the second round Honest Anse went at her, and drove her 
out in 2:22}. Between the second and third heats Eoff bet, 
or pretended to bet, $500 that Princess would win the next 
heat. That set the pot to boiling. It rattled McMann, 
He knew Princess was fast, and he was afraid of ber. 
Although Eoff had agreed to let Flora win every heat and 
race McMann knew he was a wolf. McD nald told McMann 
that he would not have Flora beaten for $10 000, and i' 
Princess beat her he would take the mare away from him' 

Now, the truth of the matter was, Eoff's bet of $500 was a 
myth. He had no idea that he could beat Flora with 
Princess, but he wanted to make her stretch her neck and 
get a fast record so that she would get out of his way. He 
had the horse Frank Forrester (Ike Cook) that he wanted to 
manipulate, and Flora was in his way. Another thing, he 
wanted to catch some of the suckers. Ma it believed in 
Eoff and a lot of jiys shoved up (heir money on Princess, 
and Eoff had his imps out taking it into camp. 

Honest Anse was drawn after the second heat. Eoff sent 
Princess after Flora hammer and tongs in the third heat, and 
carried ber to the half in 1:10. At the head of the home- 
stretch both mares were lapped. Here Eoff sang out to Mc* 
Mann that he would bet him $200 he'd beat him home. 
McMann was rattled and scared to death. He lifted and 
shook Flora up and kept at her till they passed the score, 
never looking bacs to see where Princess was. Flora crossed 
the line in 2:19i, with Princess eight or ten lengths back of 
her. When the time was hung out bedlam broke loose. 
Nothing like it had ever been done before. Hats, canes, 
umbrellas, handkerchiefs and bonnets went into the air. 
While Jim Eoff was shaking his sides with laughter, Jim 
McMann's face was as sour as vinegar. He had shown up 
his mare, and he did not get a cent extra for doing it. Jim 
Eoff had gained his point, and Flora was out of his way. 



yards in the whole mile and a half. The bear lumbered 
along with leaps equal to a greyhound, and his pursuer did 
not have a chance to cut him out from his retreat. 

''I went over the course the next day to verify the story, 
for it sounded fishy to me. I found that the bear bad made 
jumps from 15 to 20 feet in length, and that the ground had 
been cut up by hie claws so that it looked as if a harrow had 
been running over it. For that reason I would advise no 
man to try a foot race with a grizzly." 



Neglect of a Cough or Sore 
Throat often results in an 
Incurable Lung Disease or 
Consumption. For relief in 
Throat troubles useBROWN's 
Bronchial Troches, a sim- 
ple yet effective remedy. Sold only in boxes. 




Among the horses belonging to Parkville Farm which 
Andy McDowell is handling are some very speedy youngsters 
which should develop winning speed, besides some well 
known horses with records. They are as follows : Fleece, a 
three year old by Director, dam Nancy Stamm, by Stamboul, 
out of the dam of Nancy Hanks. Ora Wocds, a three year 
old, by Ora Wilkes, dam Mystic, the dam of Fred Kohl and 
Mystery, which is well thought of. Pasonle, the bay mare 
with a four year old record of 2:13, foaled at Palo Alto Stock 
Farm in 1893, by Palo Alto, dam Sontag Dixie, by Toronto 
Sontag, second dam Dixie, by Billy Townes. She is looking 
wonderfully well, and the chances are great tbat she will 
prove a prominent factor on the trotting turf next season. 
During the season of 1898 she showed 2:10 speet!; in fact ws 8 
only beaten a nose by Tommy Britton at that time, over the 
Cleveland track. Last season, on account of the death of her 
owner, she was only given road work. Argos' Director, out 
of the dam of Crafty, is an exceedingly good prospect. Susie 
T. 2:09$, by Ambassador, darn Nell, by Estil Eric, is a pacer 
of high degree and promises to excel her record the coming 
season. Dolly Phoebe is a five year old which is receiving 
much attention. My Trinket, by Stamboul, dam Trinket. 
Town Lady 2:11}, foaled in 1892 at Lexington by Wilton, 
dam Ksdijth, by Red Wilkes, is looking good, and it is 
thought will be able to win in her class next season. Baron 
Artus, a three year old chestnut gelding, by Arlus, dam 
Octavia, by Baron Wilkes, is a fast, good gaited green one 
that should be up among the winners. Emir is a chestnut 
geldiog three years old, by Advertiser, out of Emma Rob- 
son, a thoroughbred mare. With this lot Parkville Farm 
ou^ht to cut a prominent figure down the line next season. 



Horse and Bear Race. 



'Some people think tbat a grizzly can't run," said A. J 
s, of Ptceaix, Ariz. " I want to state right now that 
while the bear is a clumsy beast, he can cover as much 
ground as the average saudle horse, and a man should be 
sure that he has a good mount before he tries to get out of 
the way of one which is angry. My brother was out in the 
mountains of the territory, among the sheep ranches, one 
day when he saw, about 250 yards ahead of him, a big, awk- 
ward silver tip. My brother had a rifle, but he was not cer 
tain that be wculd kill the bear if be shot, and he did no t 
know bow a race would turn out. He'was mounted on one 
of the best horseB in the country, for a man needed one in 
those days. Ha knew that the bear would not fight unleP 8 
wounded or cornered, and he thought he would like to see 
how be would run against his horse. 

"He was pretty certain that the bear would run from him 
if be could once get him started in the opposite direction 
and so he gave a regular cowboy yell. The bear looked up, 
and started shuttling ofl toward the mountain, about a mile 
and a half away. My brother spurred his horse and it lit 
out after the grizzly, at the same time keeping up the pierc- 
ing 'Yeep-yeep' of the cowboy. The bear soon got into the 
running, and the way be got over that ground was a caution. 
My brother saw that the brute wsb getting away from him, 
and he urged his horse <o the utmost, but he did not gain 10 



One of the California trotters which came East early las t 
summer and was expected to prove a worthy rival to The 
Abbot, was the fast Monterey 2:09J. Something was wrong 
with the horse, however, and he never showed the form the 
western contingent had prophesied, proving a rather unsatis- 
factory horse to bet on in most of his races. Monterey is 
coming in for more discussion now, as there is a dispute as 
to the identity of his sire. The book has given it Sidney, 
but it is claimed by some who are reliable that Simmocolon 
is the sire of this trotter. As both Sidney and 8immocolon 
were in California, a statement is made that the credit 0^ 
Monterey was given Sidney to help along his big list, ae 
Simmocolon was not then regarded from the standpoint of 
the stock farm. Ooe thing which has kept the matter from 
being aired is the fact that George Hammond owns Simmo- 
colon and has him at Ypsilanti, and Will Hammond has 
Sidney out at Pontiac, and it wouldn't be very good taste for 
two brothers to get into an argument of this sort. — Detroit 
News-Tribune. 

When the first horse to trot in 2:10 was first named it was 
J. I. C , the initials of his owner's name. When he made 
his first start at the old West Hide track, in 1881, the clerk in 
the pool room at the Palmer House was writing the names of 
the starters on the board, and when he came to J. I. C , he 
asked the clerk who was calling ofl : "How do you spell it?" 
His answer was : "I don't know." The man with the chalk 
wrote it on the board "Jay Eye See," and so it went. 



A Reliable Remedy. 



Mr. K. H. Salisbury, of Traverse City, Mich., writes: "The package of 
Quhin's (liniment which you sent me has cured two cases of cracked 
heel and nevcral olher sores of Ioiik standing. It Is the best remedy that 
I know of." For curbs, splints, spavins, wlndputfs and all hunches use 
Qllinn'a Ointment. Ment by mall or express, prepaid, upon receipt ot 
11.60; smaller llM 50 cents Address W. B. Kddy <t Co., Whitehall, 
N. Y., unless you can obtain It from your druggist. 



What Classes Do You Want? 

Horsemen who will campaign, strings on the Pacific Coast this year are requested 
to fill out the following blank and return it to the Breeder and Sportsman office. 
The information will be of great value to Secretaries in arranging their pro- 
grammes for the coming racing season. 

Trotting Classes — — ■■ 

Pacing Classes : 

Number of Horses I Expect to Campaign Trotters Pacers 

Cut this out and mail it to the Signed 

Breeder and Sportsman, 22 Geary St., S. F. Address 



70 



[February 3, 1900 



The Sulky. 



8peedways are becoming popular in every American 
city. 

Reddino has asked for a date in the Northern California 
circuit. 

Roles for speedway contests are to be adopted by the 
road riders in New York. 



Some one has figured it out that of the 292 2:10 pacers, 
seventy-five made their records with the aid of hopples. 



The $25 000 offer for Jupe 2:07* was made by Thomas W. 
Law son, Boston, through James Golden and Herbert Gray. 



The first race John R. Gentry 2:00* won was the 2:35 
class at Higginsville, Mo., August 25, 1892, in 2:5:5$, 2:48*. 
2:41 *. 

Of the 3500 horses and mules that were shipped to Africa 
from .New Orleans recently only 105 head were lost on the 
voyage. 

Ed. Geeks owned only a half interest in the $10,000 
Direct Hal. Chafee Bros., Spring Hill, Tenn , owned the 
other half. 

ViDtTTE 2:16 by Alexander Button is believed to be 
safely in foal to Altamont and was the first mare bred to him 
this year. 

Gaff Tofsail's owner offers a purse of $250 forihe get of 
his horse to contest for as three year olds in 1904 on the 
Vallejo track. 

McKinney was taken to Pleasanton this week. He i S 
looking better than he ever did in his life and is one of the 
handsomest horses in America. 



J. J. Conner, of Salinas, is driving his fine trotting geld- 
ing, Shelby 2:19|, by Wilkes Moor, on the road this winter. 
Shelby makes an ideal road horse. 



Arthur W. 2:11 J has his book nearly full as he is to be 
bred to but ten mares He is looking wonderfully well and 
J. M. Nelson says he likes him better every time he pgs 
him. 

Dictatcs 2:18}, one of the best bred horses in the country 
and the sire of JDiciatress 2:12}, will make the season of 1900 
at Salinas where a dozen or more mares have already been 
booked to him. 

The Golden Gate Park Driving Association has secured 
the Oakland track for matinee racing May 30ih. President 
Thos. H. Williams very kindly gave the use of the grounds 
and track tree to the association. 



Fill out the blank headed "What Classes Do You Want?' 
published in this issue and send it to this office immediately. 
It will enable Secretaiies to get out their programs early if 
trainers will attend to the matter promptly. 



The omission of a figure made our Los Angeles corre- 
spondent say last week that there was a crowd ot 200 at the 
matinee racing in that city January 20th. It should have 
read 2000, and some estimated the crowd at still larger. 



Direct is having mares booked to him every day. He 
never looked as well as he does now, A number of his get 
will be trained in California this year, and we predict right 
now that this State will add three or four to his 2:20 list 
before "the ides of November." 



The first foal at Palo Alto this year is a brown filly by 
Dexter Prince out of Elden (3) 2:19$ by Nephew; second 
dam by Electioneer; third dam bailie Gardner, thoroughbred 
mare by Vandal. The little miss arrived January 9ih. She 
has been christened Princess Elden. 



Cha8. Derby 2:20 and Owyhee 2:11, will stand for public 
service at Oakwood Park Stock Farm, the former at a fee of 
$100, the latter at $50 for the season. Some notes on these 
stallions, their performances and blood lines will appear next 
week in the Breeder and Sportsman. 



Diablo 2:09} will get a still larger number of new per- 
formers in 1900 than be did in 1899. There is not one that 
is being worked this year but is showing speed enough to 
beat 2:30. Diablo will have a number of every choice mares 
booked to him this year — the best lot he has ever been mated 
with. 

G. Lapham, of Alameda, has leased from Mr. Fraser the 
stallion Secretary by Director and will make the season of 
1900 with him at the Alameda track. Secretary is one of 
the greatest sires of style, siza and good looks ever in this 
State and all his get have speed. He is a grand looking 
horse. 

L. M. La dd, of Hollister, recently purchased from G. P. 
McNear, of Hollister, a four year old full blood Clydesdale 
stallion by Buffalo Bill out of imported Maid of the Mist, 
the purchase price being $1000. Robert I. Orr, of Hollister, 
has a full brother to this horse and both are grand specimens 
of the breed. 



Mr. A. F. 8hce of Los Angeles, who purchased Beech- 
wood 2:10* a few weeks ago, has sold the daughter of Silk- 
wood to Mr. Joseph Desmel of Los Angeles, who will use 
her for matinee racing. Our Los Angeles correspondent 
states that Beechwood worked a half in 1:05 before the sale 
and that Mr. Stice doubled his money on her. 



But one mare has two daughters that have each produced 
two 2:12 performers. Mary by Flaxtail has that honor. 
She is the dam of Leltie by Wayland Forrtst, who produced 
Wayland W. 2:12i and Welcome 2:10*. 8he is also the 
dam of Grace by Buccaneer, who produced Daedalion 2:11 
and Creole 2:15. 

The Nutwood Driving Club, of Dubuque, la., is prepar- 
ing for a big race meeting for 1900, which will in every 
respect equal or exceed its former meetings, and that is 
saying a great deal, for last year the purees were very valu- 
able, and the men who are at the head of this organization 
know no such thing as fail. 



Nutwood Weeks, the dam of Ethel Downes 2:lfj, is 
heavy with foal to Altamont and will be booked to him 
again. This mare is now wenty years of age, but doesn't 
look half of it. She was foaled the year her dam (Lady 
Weeks by Williamson's Belmont) was twenty -six years old 
and has inherited her remarkable vigor. 



Sam Hoy will have another fast performer by Bays 
water Wilkes, sire of Kelly Briggs 2:10-4, this year. The 
pedigree of Bayswater Wilkes, as given in these columns a 
few weeks ago has attracted a great deal of attention. His 
fourth dam the thoroughbred race mare Fannie Howard is 
also the dam of Firetail, the son of Norfolk that sired the 
dam of Mits Logan 2:06}. 



Gus Lindauer, the well known liveryman and horse 
dealer of 862 Howard street, this city, recently purchased a 
car load of draft horses at Gilrov, Santa Clara county, for 
shipment to British Columbia. Nine of the horses were 
purchased from Henry Miller and two from S. N. Maze. 
They averaged 1600 pounds each, brought an average of $160, 
and were a fine lot of horses. 



C. M. Barney, formerly Secretary of the Woodland Dis- 
trict Fair Association but now a resident of Gilroy, passed 
through San Francisco last week after a sojourn of two weeks 
at his old home in Woodland. He reports a deep interest 
being taken by the Woodlandites in the proposed fair this 
year and thinks Secretary C. F. Thomas, aided by the Di- 
rectors, will make it a great success. 

Trainkr Robinson has begun work on three young 
horses, and is occupying stalls at G. Lapham's "Horse Hotel 
and Speed School. " Mr. Robinson has the good gelding 
Dolador five years old by Advertiser out of Dolly Nutwood, 
and Agate, a six vear old by Boxwood out of Ladv Agnes 
by Electioneer. Both these geldings were bred at Palo Alto 
Farm and are very promising green horses. 



Clarence D\ y has four or five trotters and pacers at his 
home on Central avenue in Alameda and is working them on 
the Alameda track. Two of them are by Dictatus and two 
by Clarence Wilkes out of a mare by Fall is . The last two 
mentioned are three and four years old respectively and are 
square trotters. Both are verv promising. Tbey belong to 
W. J. Gillespie of Redding and will probably be raced this 
year. 

Kentucky Baron, a royally bred son of the great Baron 
Wilkes, and the only stallion by that horse now stand ng 
for service in California, will make the season of 1900 at 
Colusa to a limited number of mares, and will be campaigned 
this year. Kentucky Baron is a grand individual and his 
breeding is unsurpassed. There is a three year old by bim 
now being worked at Chico that is expected to be one of the 
surprises of the year when racing begins. 



R. E. Whidden of Santa Cruz has booked a mare to 
Altamont (bis year. She is by a eon of Mambrino Wilkes 
out of a full sister to the dam of Loupe 2:09}. Mr. Whid- 
den called at the Breeder and Sportsman office last 
Wednesday, having just returned from a visit to T. E. 
Keating at Pleasanton, and had many complimentary re- 
marks to make of the approved appearance of everything at 
that celebrated training ground. 



The only mare that has produced four 2:15 performers is 
Nell, a roan mare by Estell Eric out of a mare bv Embry'a 
Lexington. 8he is the dam of Belle Vara 2:08}, Vassar 
2:07, Susie T. 2:09} and Ambidexter 2:11}. The thorough- 
bred "close up" has certainly efflicted Nell with the speed 
producing disease Those theorists who think there is noth- 
ing but harm to result from the introduction of the "hot 
blood," should have Nell quarantined. 



Grace Kaiser, the dam of McZeus 2:13, and Coney 2:07} 
will be bred to Nutwood Wilkes this year. A gentleman in 
San Mateo has written to Mr. Carter stating that be desires 
to book ten mares to his great young horse. Juan Gallegos, 
of Mission tan Jose, has a giand looking yearling bv Nut- 
wood Wilkes, out of Sable, the dam of Sable Wilkes 2:18.aod 
has already bred the old mare to bim again this year. Nut- 
wood Wilkes will have a very choice lot of mares mated with 
him this season. 

Dick Benson, of Kansas City, visited Pleasanton the 
other day and was so taken with the appearance of Clipper 
2:09}, bv Diablo 2:09}, that he offered his owner C. A. 
Durfee $2000 for him and then raised it to $2100, which 
was refused. He also offered Mr. Durfee $750 for Miss 
Jessie 2:14 by Gossiper, but Du fee wanted $1000 and 
that trade failed. Durfee told him he could have t em 
both for $3000, but Mr. Benson said he only wanted 
one. Since then Mr. Durfee worked Clipper a slow 
mile letting him step the last eighth prettv well and 
was so pleased with him that he raised the price to $3000 
and is not anxious to sell him at that. 



Elias Williams is rapidly recovering from the results of 
his recent accident and is driving Silver Bow Jr. again. 
Last Sunday Ike Morehouse and Dan Dennison visited the 
Alameda track and Mr. Williams trotted Silver Bow Jr. out 
for inspection. This handsome b'g stallion was taken with 
that disease resembling distemper that was so prevalent last 
vear and was thrown out of training. He has only been 
jieged this winter but is looking in splendid condition. 
"Doc" warmed him up a little and let him step through the 
stretch while Mr. Morehouse held the watch. He was not 
urged and in fact Williams held bim back, but he trotted an 
eighth in 17* seconds and did it so nicely that all who saw 
the performance were highly pleased with it and ready to 
predict a fast mark for him. He has a little too much action 
if anything, but is as square as a die and not inclined to mix 
in the least. He could show 2:12 speed right now if asked, 
and is one of the best individuals in the State. 



C. A. Durfee is receiving letters from all over the Pacific 
Coast in regard to the breeding of mares to his great horse 
and will book the greatest lot of mares ibis year the son of 
Aicyone has ever been mated with. That "champion siie of 
2:15 performers at twelve years of age" is a drawing card 
sure to those who want the. sort that can win the money. 



Hambletonian Wilkss will have a good patronage this 
year. Col. Moorhead is receiving letters every day from 
breedeis who wish to mate their mares to this great son of 
George Wilkes. A three year old by him is "the best looking 
colt in California." according to an Eastern gentleman who 
loosed him over at San Jose recently after a tour of the 
leading stock farms. 

One of the handsomest broodmares in California is Oak- 
villa Maid 2:26. by Whippleton. She belongs to Mr. John 
Lutgen, the well known wine merchant of this city, who has. 
two very fine looking foals from her by Altamont, a yearling 
and a two year old. She is not with foal this year and is be- 
ing given a little track work by J. M. Nelson at the Alameda 
track and can show better than a 2:20 clip already. Mr. 
Nelson has recently received from Humboldt county a big 
six year old gelding that is a brother in blood to lora 2:11*, 
being by Ira and out of a mare by Pascora Hay ward. This 
fellow never had a days track work in his life and when 
Nelson received him had 21 ounce shoes in front and 16 be- 
hind. With these on his feet and hitched to a big high 
wheeled cart that weighs 140 pounds he marched off a ; 
quarter in 38 seconds the first time Nelson hooked bim up 
and he thinks he will do to train. He is a big rangy fellow 
and bis legs and feet are perfect. The colt by Alexis in Mr. 
Nelson's string is one of the grandest looking youngsters in 
California We are promised a picture of him when the 
sun shines. 

G. Lapham is getting bis stalls full at the Alameda track 
and will soon be nicking speed with some of bis charges. He 
has a black pacer that he calls Robert H. and which is go- 
ing to make the green ones step better than 2:15 the first 
time they start this year. He is by Pilot Prince out of a 
mare by Steinway. Mr. Lapham has a good looking black 
stallion called Sir Roderick Jr. which is one of the three 
which comprise all that Sir Roderick, son of Dictator and 
Prospect Maid by George Wilkes, ever sired, Phcebe Cbilders 
2:12, being another. Sir Roderick Jr. shows the Wilkes 
blood in a marked degree and has a very promising way of 
going May Melody is the euphonious name that nas been 
bestowed on a black mare owned by W. Ford Thomas, the 
well known customs adjuster of this city. This mare is one 
of the handsomest animals in California, and Mr. Lapham is 
confident that she will get a low mark this year if raced. She 
is a natural trotter, pare gaited and very speedy and when in 
motion is a perfect picture of graceful action. She is by 
Secretary out of a daughter of Rustic, second dam by 
Whippleton, thiid dam by Gladiator. 



Robert S. Brown of Petaluma has purchased the stallion 
Meridian 2:12} by Simmocolon (sire of Dan Q 2:07*) out of 
Sidane by Sidney; second dam Addie 8. by Steinway; third 
dam Aldane by Wissahickon 947; fourth dam Winthrop 
Girl by Winthrop 505,; fifth dam by Chieftain 721; sixth 
dam by Billy Wallace, son of Snowstorm. Meridian is a 
rovally bred borse and was a race horse. He was foaled in 
1892 and his first race was in this city in 1896. It was a six 
heat race and Meridian won the first and second heats, taking 
a record of 2:20 and paced a game race throughout being 
close to the winner Strathmont 2:12* in the last heat and 
eel t eg second money in a field of ten. At Nspa he had an- 
other six beat race which he won, lowering bis record to 
2:16*. The next year he started in seven races meeting nearly 
all the best pacers on the California circuit and won four 
first moneys, was once second and twice fourth, closing the 
season with a record of 2:12}. He has not been raced since. 
Meridian is a very handsome horse and should sire extreme 
speed if mated with good mares. Mr. Brown will place bim 
in the stud at his farm near Petaluma at a fee for the season 
of $25. 

H. R Ward, who for several years prior to the death of 
the late W. H. Crabb was the trainer of the horses bred and 
owned at Tokalon Stock Farm in Napa county, has opened a 
public training stable at the Alameda track. He has three 
promising young horses in his string already and will have 
several new ones sent to him within the next two weeks. A 
five year old mare by Diablo 2:09}, owned by J. D. Horan 
of this city, is certain to be heard from if raced, as is a four 
year old by Allen Wilkes that is the property of J. 8. Taylor 
of Napa. Both are verv speedy and have a nice way of 
going. Mr. Ward has a fine big six vear old gelding in 
charge that is endowed with a very generous amount of good 
looks and style and when informed that he was by The Dane, 
a son of Stamboul and Dolly McMann the dam of Lilly 
Stanley 2:17*, we could see the strong likeness of the sire in 
him. It will be remembered that The Dane was bred by 
present United States Attorney F. L. Coombs, who sold him 
in New York where he took several prizes in the horse 
shows. This promising son is owned by Mr. Ludwig of this 
city. Mr. Ward is a careful and painstaking trainer and has 
been very successful with trotters and pacers. 

Dr. H. Latham, who had the gray mare Secret 2:26* by 
Secretary worked two years ago at the Alameda track, says 
it is undoubtedly the best place to train horses there is in 
California. Here are some of the advantages he claims for 
the track: Ease of access from tbe metropolis being but 35 
minutes ride by two lines from San Francisco at a cost of a 
dime. Good climate. A track which will positively not 
sore horses and which can be used more days in the year 
than any track in America. Excellent streets for jogging on 
in rainy weather. A mile straight away in addition to tbe 
circular track and just as good, thus furnishing the oppor- 
tunity of variety and preventing horses from getting track 
sour. A beach within half a mile where horses can be daily 
waded in salt water, a course of treatment that is the very 
best to keep the feet and legs in good condition. The beet 
of hay and grain to be obtained by the pound or ton at a 
moment's notice. Grass paddocks adjoining stall or within 
ten minutes' walk where horses can be given a run to grass. 
All these and a few more that we do not recall are the 
reasons the Doctor gave for his claim that Alameda track is 
the best place to train horses he ever saw. The Doctor's 
mare Secret is now in charge of Cbas. Marvin at Lexington 
and is said to have more speed than she ever had, which is 
saying a good deal, as tbe writer of this paragraph saw her 
trot a quarter in 1898 in 32 seconds. 



February 3, 1900] 



11 




Barney 8chreiber's two year old filly Sofala met defeat 
last week for ihe first time out of five starts. Though beaten 
she was Dot disgraced, as the victor? of Duofree was un- 
questionably due to the advantage gained at the start, which 
was one of Mr. Ferguson's worst exhibitions. 



Sybakis is one of the best sons of the great Morello and is 
practically unbeatable on a muddy track. 



Attend the sale of race horses in training at the Oakland 
track, February 9th. Some good money earners will be 
offered 

8at8dma and May W. both 6eem to have seen their best 
days, neither displaying the speed acd form shown in past 
seasons. 

Whitcomb has been a more than useful performer in Dr. 
Bowell'e stable and is ready to go out and win more races 
any day. 

Blooming Chance has shown himself to be one of the 
fastest horses in training and should gain winning brackets 
in his next start. 

Potente ran a good race in the mile and a sixteenth, 
covering the distance in 1:53 with 109 pounds in the saddle 
and winning very easily. 



Benporan took up 122 lbs. and galloped six furlongs in 
1:121; had there been anything to force him out a new record 
would have been set for the distance. 



Jael, a five year old mare brought out her by Mike Daly, 
finally succeeded in graduating from the maiden class, after 
numerous essays both here and on Eastern tracks. 



Dr. H. E. Rowell will sell some of the older members of 
his string, as he has quite a lot of two year olds coming on 
which he says will give him all that he can attend to. 



Dolore, starting for the first time in the colors of her new 
owner J. M. Crane, ran a good race, winning easily in 1:28£ 
for the seven furlongs over a track that was only fair. 



Soeala won again from Barney Pchreiber and demon- 
strated that the bad start one was responsible for ber defeat 
by the Burns & Waterhouse entry on a previous occasion. 



F. W. Doss ran Sly up $700 above her entered price; this 
is the second time within a week this has occurred, and 
owner Hanlon must find the business of winning selling races 
rather an expensive one. 

The thoroughbred stallion Pactolus by Uncas, dam 
Cadence, purchased by Crawford Bros, of New Jersey for 
$225, has been shipped to Ireland, where he will be used in 
the stud for breeding hunters. 



Cipbiano seems to be a bad betting proposition; on every 
occasion of bis starting he is heavily backed, and after show- 
ing the way to his field for the first three-eighths drops out 
of the running and finishes outside the money. 



Db Rowell's horses Satsuma, Tom Cromwell, Dr. Ber- 
nays, 8ybaris, Whitcomb and Blooming Chance will be Bold 
at auction at the Oakland Track on Friday, February 9th, 
by Chase & Mendenhall, live stock auctioneers. 



8atsuma ought to make a great sire. He is a great race 
borse, there are few better individuals than he in America 
or any other country and his breeding is excellent. He will 
be sold at auction at the Oakland track Friday, February 9th. 



The finish in the mile and a sixteenth between Scotch 
Plaid, Merops, Opponent and Wyoming was of the most ex- 
citing ever seen, heads only separating the four contestants. 
Everv foot of the last fifty yards was gamely struggled for 
with first one head in front and then the other, with the 
issue in doubt until the last stride was taken. 



Dr Sheppahd, off to a flying break, held his advantage 
throughout and though Dr. Nembula and Flamora closed 
stoutly managed to win by a neck; running the mile and a 
sixteenth in 1:45}, which equals the Pacific Coast record ft 
the distance. Had Mr. Ferguson dispatched the field on 
even terms the victory would have fallen to other hands as 
both the second and third horses ran better races than the 
winner. 

A kama da seems to meet with mifortune on every oceanic n 
on which she is pitted against Sly; twice within a week these 
two mares have met at six furlongs and in both instances the 
victory has gone to Sly on account of the advantage gained 
by getting the better of a bad start. It certainly seems a 
very unsatisfactory state of affairs whtn the better horse is 
repeatedly beaten with no lack of condition or speed on its 
part. 

Antler, the half-brother to Deerslayer, of which great 
things were expected, graduated from the maiden class this 
week at Oakland. His win was not a very impressive one, 
and there was certainly nothing to spare, as the first teven 
horses finished heads apart. The judges experienced some 
difficulty in placing the contestants in euch a close finish 
and were unable to separate the second and third horses 
calling it a dead heat for place and show honors. 



Peiseus made his reappearance after a rest of almost two 
years and succeeded in defeating Stuttgart and a fairly go d 
field of horses over a mile of ground. Trainer Murry did 
not think well of his cbancas as his legs are in bad condition; 
so bad that Mr. Murry, but a short time ago, seriously con- 
templated destroying the son of King Galop and Nanka. It 
is Deedless to sav tbat, under tbe circumstances, be carried 
no stable money, although thirties were readily obtainable 
about him in the ring. 

Don Cameron cut loose a good thing in the five and a 
half furlong race at Oakland last week. Flamora, a son of 
Flambeau and Boriar, was to have been made the medium 
of an old-fashioned Log slaughtering, but euch a hot tip had 
been circulated about tbe horse tbat the books were very 
cbary of laying against him; and although tens were his 
opening odds, but very little money was accepted at tbese 
figures and his price was quickly cut to six to five. Jenkins, 
who had the mount, lay in second place until near the finish, 
when he loosened a wrap and galloped in an easy winner. 



Six furlongs Selling. Four years old and npward. Purse $350— 
Cormorant 111 (Plggntt) IS to 1 won, St. Cuthbert 109 second, Momentum 
112 third. Lady Meddlesome, Tirade, Croker. P. A. Flnnegan, Kl Kstro. 
Time 1:18*. 

Oue mile. "elllng. Three years old and upward. Purse $400— Per 
be us 97 (T. Walsh) 25 to I won, Sluttsart 107 second, Alarla 110 third. 
Corolla, Ctprlano, Whalehack, Hlxford, Antler, Summer, Allenna. 
Time 1:42. 

Five lu longs. Tnree years old and upward. Purse M00— Mldlove 
111 (Bullman) 1 to I won, Lady Heiolse IIS second, Tlburmi 113 third. 
Vlorls, A'ate wick, Malada, Asian, Bogus Bill, Brown Prince, Druldess. 
Time ISO*. 

One mile and a sixteenth. Selling. Four years old and upward. 
Purse uro-scotch fluid 103 (Jenkins) 6 lo S won. Meiops 101 second, 
Opponent 105 third. Wyoming, Imperious„Mary KliiBella.Jlnlgle Jingle. 
Time i i 1 ' i 

six furlongs, telling. Three years old and upward. Purse 4400— 
Sly 108 (Bullmau) IS to S won. Atamsda 10S second, Bon Ledl 108 third. 
Southern Ulrl, Burdock, Antoinette, Mike Rice. 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 27. 

Seven furlongs. Selling Tbiee jear olds. Purse $400— Tulhlll 107 
( Viltltoe) 16 to 6 wi n. Limerick 107 second, Mont Fagle 103 third. Ksstnce 
Autlouetta, Dai. lei. Time 1:27*. 

Sl« lurlongs. Three year olds and upward. Purse 1350- Dlomed 101 
(Walsh) 7 to 5 won j Itedwald 108 second. L. B. McWhlrtlr 106 third, Nor- 
lord, Harry Tbalcher Honiara, Flist Shot. Time 1:18*. 

Three furlongs. Maiden two year olds. Purs j $400— Slg Levy 11 
(Jenkins) II to 20 won, Lily Dlggs 1 10 (Walsh) 6 lo I won. (lame Warden 
110 third. (4rsfier, Woeful, -botaway, Aphrodls, Parsifal, wladla, Peut 
Etre, Cavanaugh. Tlrue0::i6*. 

One mile. Llsssk handicap. Three yea' olds and upward. Purse 
$1500— Banntckhurn 128 (Bullmau 4 to 5 won, Flamora 96 second, Dr. 
bheppard 110 third. Rusormoude, David Tenny,Dr. Nembula. i Ime 1:30 

Six lurlongs. Free handicap Three year olds and upward. Purse $400 
— lieniloran 122 (Spencer) 9 to 20 won, trunk Bell 110 second, Ben Led! 
105 third. Nuvia. Time 1:12*. 

One mile. Selling. Three year olds. 1'urse $100— Slsquoc 107 (Buch- 
anan) 25 to I won.Florablrd llothlrd, Aborigine 107 third. Saul of Tarsus 
Nance O'Nell, Hippouax.Choteau, FlUe d'Or, Miss Vera M isslon, Tlng- 
a-Ling. Time 1:42. 

MONDAY, JANUARY 29. 
Seven lurlongs. Selll'g. Four > ear olds and upward. Purse $350— 
Dolore 101 (Jenkins) 5 to 2 won, Schiller 106 secoi d, Correct 104 third . 
Ciprian i, Cr->ker. Sylvan Las-, lsabelle, Delecia, San Augustloe, St. 
Isidore, Clarando. Time 1:28*. 

Fuiurlty course. elling. Three year olds. Purse $300— Redwald 108 
(Spencerj 7 to 10 won. tla'ry Thatcher 105 second, Randora 103 third. 
Hlpponax, Nance O'Nell, Corolla, Almendral. Ttme 1:1294. 

Six furlongs. Mares tour years old and upward Purse $350— May W. 
107 ( Jen kins t 3 to 5 won. I nip. Clonsilla 107 second, Monrovia 107 third, 
February, -Ister Alice, (lien Anne, Yule. Time 1:14. 

One mile and an eighth. Selling. Fi ur year olds and upward. Purse 
$4U(i— Toritio 107 (Jenkins) 4 to 1 won. Reii Pirate 104 se oud, Imperious 
109 third. Del Pas i II., Coda, Orand Sachem, Inverary II.. Dixies Laud. 
Time 1-53*. 

Seven furlongs. Selling Four years old and upward. Purse $850— Col 
Root 108 (Conlayj 30 to 1 wm.iMeadow I rk 105 second, Owyhee 107 third. 
Lost ulrl, Romany, r-klrniish, Manzanllla, Koadruoner, Ballsta. 
Time 1:28^. 

One mile, Free handicap Three year o'.ds. Purse $600— F. W. Erode 
115 ( Bullman) 7 to 10 won, Anjnu 115 second, Bathos 103 third. My Gypsy, 
Norford, Bogus Bill 'lime 1:42, 



The Lissak 8take for three year olds and upward was de- 
cided at Oakland last Saturday and Bannockburn repeated 
his performance of the previous week (in the Turf Congress 
Stake), again running the distance in 1:39 flat. There was 
some delay at tbe start caused by tbe use of the recall fl.'g, 
and when the field was finally dispatched the start was 
marred by Dr. 8heppard being allowed to beat the gate sev- 
eral lengths; this advantage, however, availed him nothing, 
as both the winner acd Flamora passed him in the stretch 
and beat bim to the wire. Flamora was ofi absolutely last 
and with an even break would unquestionably bave forced 
Bannockburn to run in faster time to beat her. The victory 
of Schreiber's horse was a very popular one. 



Db. Bebnays has won many good races over a distance uf 
ground. One of bis noteworthy performances was winning 
at a mile and an eighth after meeting with an accident 
while at (he post and running away a mile and a half before 
the race. 

Tom Cromwell, to be sold by Chase & Mendenhall, the 
well known auctioneers February 9ib, was one of tbe beet 
handicap horses at New York three years ago and when in 
the stable cf Mike Dwver was ready money in almost all of 
his starts. 

It is announced that the racing stable and breeding stud 
of the late Duke of Westminster will be sold on March 8th 
at public auction with the exception of Orme and Bend Or. 
Flying Fox, it is stated, will be offered with a stiff reserve 
price on him. 

The racing at Oakland on Wednesday was chiefly re- 
markable for the large number of long shot winners, but two 
favorites proving successful. Jennie Reid and Olinthus were 
both fortunate to win, the victory in each instance being due 
to sheer luck. 

A cabload of two year olds from E J. Baldwin's Santa 
Anita Ranch arrived at Tanforan Park last Wednesday. 
There are some fine looking youngsters in the lot which may 
be depended upon to give a good account of themselves in 
the near future. 

Tobibio has turned out to be a very useful selling plater; 
two years ago, in his three year old form he would stop 
badly going six furlongs; now he has won several races at a 
mile and last Monday be defeated quite a good field of horses 
over a mile and an eighth of ground. 



A model of a new starting machine, which will be given 
a trial on some of tbe New York tracks next season, was 
exhibited at the recent meeting of the Jockey Club in that 
city. The machine is the invention of Hamuel Snedecker, 
and tbe inventor is confident tbat with it the starting of 
horses will be vastly improved. The litile model is run by 
electricity, and if the bulkier machine moves as smoothly 
there may be a place on the race track for this barrier. VI e 
machine is operated on two narrow gauge tracks laid on the 
outside of the course, on which are run little trucks. From 
each truck a perpendicular wooden post shoots into the air 
and a fabric band completes the barrier. Electric wires con- 
nect the machine with the starter's box. The barrier is 
placed several yards behind the starter, and as tbe horses 
move up for the flag the barrier moves with tbem. When 
the starter is ready to Bend the horses off he simply presses 
the electric button and the posts with the fabric fly into the 
air, and the wild scramble for the winning post is started. 
The new machine will bave atrial at Qravesend at the spring 
meeting. 

Oakl tnd Summaries. 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 30. 




One mile and a sixteenth. Sellirg. Four year olds and npward. 
Purse $4u(i— notobed 104 (Jenklnsi 1 to 2 won, Olengaber 109 second, None 
Such 104 third. Twink e Twlnk, Tom Cromwell. Los Prletos. Time 
l:<7fc. 

Three and a halt furlongs. Two y. ar olds Puise $400— Sofala 115 
(Bullman) 7 to 10 won, Dunfree 115 second. Count Hubert 115 third. 
Qlrly Ducat, torn Cake, Tuornwild, Parsifal, Pat Foley. Peut Etre. 
Time 0:42^. 

One mile and three-Mghths. Selliog. Four year olds and upward. 
Purse $100— Snips 96 (Henry) 7 to 1 won Tempo 103 second, Srtsuma 1(5 
third. Dr. Marks, Billy McCloskey, Urady. Tme 2:21*. 

Seven furlongs. Selling. Three year olds. Purse $350— L. B. Mc- 
Whirter 102 ( Vitlt oe> 12 to 1 won, San Thomas 112 second. Saul of Tarsus 
109 .bird. Silver Bullion, Ailenna, Antoiuetta, Time 1:2754. 

Five and a half furlongs. Se ling. Maidens Three year olds and up- 
ward. Purse $300-Mat Hoga 93 tT. Walsh) 6 to 1 won, J V. Hayes 98 
secon . Beautiful Bill 90 third. Isallne. He. i Cherry, Blooming Chance, 
Kedgeloug, Bagdad, Naples, Cymoba, Was oe Bill. Time 1:09. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31. 

Five and a half furlongs Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse 
$350 -High Hoe 115 (Jenkins) 4 to won, Wyoming 117 second, Kosallira 
120 third. Revauna, Rio Chlco, Amasa, Yarnba, Whitcomb. Time 1:07 

Six lurlongs. Three year olds and upward. Purse $400— Asian 108 
(Spencer) 6 lo 1 won, Ella Boland 99 second, Bound lee 104 third. St. 
Anthony, St. Isidore, Pidllia. Time 1:16. 

Six lurlongs. Selling. Four year olds and upward. Purse $360— 
Jennie Held ln4 (Bullman) 13 to I won, Pomplno 100 second, Moutallade 
103 third. St. Cuthbert, Alarm, Tiburon, Dogtown, Socialist. Time 1:18* 

One mile and a sixteenth. Three year oldH and upward. Purse $400— 
Olinthus 94 (T. Walsh) 2 to I won, Dr. Nembula 100 second, Ked Pirate 
101 third. San Venado, Uraud Sachem, ItliiKinaster, Judge Wtfford. 
Time 1:463*. , 

One mile and an eighth Selling. Four year o'.ds and upward. Purse 
$100 — Potente 109 if. Walsh) 6 io 5 won, Formero 105 second, Malay 105 
third. Catastrophe, Persues. 'I ime 1:53. 

Seven lurlongs. Free handicap. Three year olds. Purse $i00— F. W. 
Rrode 121 (Bullman) 4 to 5 won. Anion no second, Bathos 105 third. 
Dlomed, Coustellator. Mission. Time 1:26^. 



(CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB MEETING.) 



THURSDAY, JANUAKZ 25. 

Five furlongs. Selling. Four years old and upward. Purse $300— 
Jael 110 I. i ni. i 7 to 2 won. Mainstay 115 second, Almoner 1.7 third. 
Durward, Spry Lark. Time 1:02. 

Seven fuilongs. Selling. Three years old. Purse $400— Andrlsn 112 
(Spencer) I io 2 won. Kachel C. 107 second, L. B. McWblrter 112 third. 
Cboteau, Daniel, Red Cherry. Time 1:27*. 

One mile and a half. Selling Four years old and upward. Purse 
$500— Topmast 102 (J. Martin) 2 to 6 won, For e 107 second. Weller 105 
third. Time 2:36*. 

Three and a half furlongs, Two years old. Purse $500 — Dunfree 110 
(Thorpe) 8 lo 1 wun, sofala 1 10 second. Lucldla 110 third, itaylon Brown, 
St. lllca, Ullagon, shotaway, orafler, Thorn Wlld.Olrly Ducat, Luculent, 
Overgrowth. Time 0:42*. 

One mile and a sixteenth. Free Handicap. Three years old and 
upward. Purse $500— Dr. sheppard 105 (Bullman) 3 to I w. u, Dr. Nem- 
bula 1U0 second, Flamora 90 ihlrd. The Fretter, Lothian, iLStallator, 
Don Luis, Satsuma. Time 1:45*. 

pslx furlongs. Free Handicap. Three years old and upward. Purse 
$400— Novla lot (T. Walsh) 7 to 2 won, Ventoro 123 second, Oood Hope 
90 third. Mav W , Boundiee. Silver Maid. Time 1:13*. 

FRIDAY. JANU VRY 28. 

Five and a half furlongs. Selling. Maidens. Four years old and 
upward Purse $8.i0— Flamero 112 (Jenkins/ 6 to 6 won, Tim Idol in 116 
second, Col. Root 112 third. Senora Caesar, Helen, Delecta, HuDcb, 
Henry O., Harry Oorby. May Bloom. Time 1 :08.i 



Horso Owners Should Ueo 
GOMBATJLT'S 

Caustic 
Balsam 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy. 

A SAFE, SPEEDY AND 
POSITIVE CURE. 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OF FIRING 

Impossible lo produce any scar or blemish. The) 
safest best Blister evor uiorl. Takes the plnca 
of nil liniments for mild or sovero action. Remove* 
all Bunches or Blemishes from Horses or Cattle. 

As a HUMAN REMEDY for Rheumatls n, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, Etc., it is invaluable, 
uie fkii a n ■ uTfC that one ti blesponnful of 

lit uUflnAFilLt caustv balsam win 

produce more actual results thau 'whole bottle of. 
any liniment or Hpavin cure mixtu .ever made. 

F.very bottle of Caustic Ba'B&m sold is Wnri an- 
ted to give satisfaction. Price r. .SO perbottle : Sola 



by druttgist*. or sent by expres charges paid, with full 
a Irectlons for ita use. Bond lor descriptive circ ilars, 
testimonials, eU^Addresa 



Irectlons for i 
SHtlmonials, eti 
THR LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS C( 



:leveland. Ohio 



72 



©I;* Qveebev emit gpuvtmnatu 



IFebruart 3, 1900 



THE HARNESS HORSE. 



It Will Take Six Years for the Supply to 
Again Equal the Demand. 



One of the most successful business men and live stock 
breeders of America is Col. Harry Exall of Dallas, Texas, 
owner of the Electioneer stallion Electrite, and on whose 
farm John Phippen, late of Palo Alto Stock Farm, is now 
the head trainer. At the meeting of the National Live 
Stock Association held at Fort Worth on January 17th, 
Col. Exall delivered the following address: 
Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen of the National Live 
Stock Association: 

On a bright day of October, 1896, a photograph was taken 
of a crowd of pleasure seekers in Lincoln Park, Chicago. 
There was net a horse in sight, but you could scarcely see 
the people for the wheels, and this picture was marked, "The 
Passing of the Horse." A photograph of the same spot was 
taken October, 1899; this time only one bicycle wag in sight, 
and that was ridden by a messenger boy, but the park was 
filled with handsome equipages drawn by speedy trotters, 
and this picture was marked, "The Return of the Horse." 
An inspection of the splendid animals that gave so much 
life to this scene and pleasure to their owners proved that 
the horse most in use was the best type of the American 
standard bred trotter — the winner at all distances on all the 
tracks of Europe, the horse that has within a month reduced 
the four mile trotting record of the world, defeating the 
mighty Orloffj in the capital city of the Czar of all the 
Russians. 

So deeply impressed has the Russian government become 
with the great value of the American trotter, that the gov- 
ernment officials have recently purchased several thousand 
for breeding purposes. More than a year ago an American 
trainer was installed in the imperial stud to school the Rus- 
sian trainers in the American methods. The superiority of 
the American trotter has forced Europeans in self defense to 
handicap our trotter to a certain extent to prevent him from 
winning everything from their native horses. 

In Vienna, Austria, are to be found some of the fastest 
American trotters, quite a number having cost their wealthy 
Austrian owners $10,000 apiece. 

In the great international races at Nice last season, first 
second and third money was won by American trotters. So 
popular have our horses become in France and Germany 
that the local horse breeders of both countries have induced 
their respective governments to place an embargo on their 
importation, but despite this monetary restriction the trade 
with these two countries is constantly increasing. 

At the great international horse shows held at Madison- 
square Garden, New York, the American trotter has for the 
past few years won in all classes — he has out-backneyed the 
Hackney, as be can not only step high, but go fast at the 
same time. As a coachy carriage horse, in either heavy or 
light harness, he has defeated all other breeds in the show 
ring, and has brought the top prices in the New York and 
London markets. Ten thousand dollars has been paid dur. 
ing the last season for an extra fine pair of trotting-bred car- 
riage horses, by a London customer. Sixty head of large- 
sized trotting-bied carriage horses, in one consignment, were 
sold in New York in December las t for $66,000, an average 
of $1100 each, and a great many pairs changed hands at 
prices ranging from $2500 to $5500, quite a number of them 
going to England. 

So much disturbed have the English Hackney and coach 
horse breeders become over the increasing demand for Ameri- 
can carriage and coach horses in England, that the London 
Live Stock Journal of a very recent date editorially advises 
that the horse breeders of Great Britian send a commission 
to the Senate to investigate the methods by whieh the Ameri- 
can breeders have been enabled to produce the splendid type 
of harness horse that is attracting so much attention in all 
Europe. 

It will thus be seen that almost every country in the civil 
ized world is looking to the United States for a supply of 
horses. 

Our export trade has grown from about 3500 head in 1894 
to almost 100,000 in 1899, and there is every indication 
that the business is yet in its infancy. The horses so far 
sent abroad, whether to race, drive in the parks or for use 
in the army, have been most satisfactory, thus insuring large 
orders in the future, and fortunately our facilities for raising 
high class horses at a comparatively small cost are vastly 
superior to those of any other country. 

What are we doing to meet this great coming demand ? 
Are we sleeping upon our rights? Let us examine the 
actual conditions. From 1894 to 1898, all or nearly all who 
owned a stock of horses were using their utmost efforts to 
sell them. Stallions were castrated and sold for drivers, 
the best individual broedmares were sold and put to work, 
and breeding was almost totally abandoned in every section 
of the United States-; farmers sold their mares, and used 
geldings or mules for their work, and even in the great 
horse breeding districts of Indiana, Ohio and Illinois, in a 
whole day's ride you would see half a dozen colts following 
their mothers. 

More than two-thirds of the great horse breeding estab- 
lishments in Kentucky ceased active operations and sold 



their stock for what it would bring in the open market, at 
such ruinously low prices that the whole breeding interest 
of the country was thoroughly demoralized On the grea 1 
ranges of California, Oregon, the Dakotas and Texas, the 
herds of horses were neglected; stallions were shot to stop 
the increase, and in many instances premiums were offered 
for the removal of the great herds of horses, in order that 
cattle, then so rapidly advancing in prices, might grow fat 
upon the grasses that were thought to be wasted upon the 
unsalable horse. 

But despite this unwonted effort to sell, and the forcing 
upon the market net only of the product of the ranges and the 
farms, but also of the very foundation stock itself, and the 
further fact that the last crop of the boom days of 1893 and 
1894 has just now reached a marketable age, and should, if 
conditions were normal, folly supply the demand, the truth 
is that the country and its business has grown so rapidly and 
the foreign demand is so great that the stock on hand is en- 
tirely inadequate. 

There is already an admitted scarcity of salable horses of 
all grades. For the first time in twenty years farmers from 
the best horse-breeding districts of the great agricultural 
sections are now firced to buy work horses in the St. Louis 
and Chicags auction markets. To assist in meeting this un- 
usual demand the Uo'on Pacific Railroad has recently closed 
a contract to bring from the Oregon ranges into the grain 
districts 9000 head of wild range horses to be fitted for use. 
If this be the condition of the market now, what will it be 
when we have consumed the boom-day horses and the avail- 
able animals from the ranges and tbe breeding ranks, and 
must depend on the crops of 1895, 1896, 1897 and 1898,when 
almost no horses were produced 7 

Do we fully comprehend the gravity of the situation? 
Mark me, we shall see in the near future every grade of use- 
ful horses worth twice as much money as his like has ever 
sold for, and the bet er grades will be proportionately higher 
than the inferior ones. All useful horses will be in great 
demand, ami it .will take the high dollar to get them. Was 
there ever such an opportunity to make money as is now 
presented to tbe intelligent, discriminating horse breeder of 
America ? We have a corner on the horse most uriversally 
in demand, we have the cheapest feed on which to raise 
him, and the wailing market of tbe world in wbich to sell 
him. 

The American trotter c"n be made to meet almost any de- 
mand. We can breed him to be 15, 151, 16 or 17 hands 
high, to weigh 900 to 1400 pounds; to trot in 2:30 or better 
with a short season's handling, and to road ten miles aj hour 
for half a day and go the other fifty miles after dinner, with 
pleasure and comfort to his driver and comparative ease to 
himself We can breed him to combine the qualities of size, 
style, all-around high action, and just the speed that is de- 
sired in the ideal carriage team, for which the demand is 
already in excess of the supply at prices ranging from $600 
to $10,000. We can breed him to trot in 2:20, 2:10, 2:03, 
and presently in two minutes, and he will be quick sale at 
$1000 to $50,000, with two or more men wanting to buy 
everyone of this character that is offered, for there is a pile 
of money to be won by any trotter that is good in his class, 
and for the best outclassed trotter wealthy gentlemen wiil 
pay almost fabulous prices to drive away business cares, while 
they outstep a friendly rival in a two minute brush on the 
great speedways now being built in all our large cities. 

A few years ago we had one Mr. Bonner and one Mr. 
Vanderbilt who were able and willing to pay $40 000 for a 
Maud S. or Sunol, solely for road use; to-day we have thou- 
sands of such men. Our country is richer than any other 
country that the world has ever known; we do things on a 
larger scale than ever before, and it would not surprise me 
to see the best colts now living bring higher prices than the 
best sold for in the boom days of 1890, when promising 
yearlings brought as much as $10,000, broodmares sold as 
high as $15,000, and $125,000 was paid for Arion, the preco- 
cious son of the mighty Electioneer. 

There are, at present, 3 000,000 fewer horses in the 
United States than there were in 1890, and over 500,000 
more in use. Think of these conditions. Our population 
is 15,000,000 greater; our business of every character won. 
derfully expanded; all tbe world is wanting our horses, and 
almost no one is raising them. Tbe very great scarcity is 
now being realized and prices are rapidly advancing. Seven 
hundred trotting bred horses, ranging in age from six months 
to ten years, were told within a week at auction in New York 
in December, for an average of about $500 each. These 
same horses would not have brought an average of $300 one 
year ago. Two young stallions have recently been sold at 
$20,000 and $25,000 respectively, and Mr. Marcus Daly has 
just paid $39,000 for thirteen extra well bred trotting brood- 
mares. Tbe upward movement has begun. 

The cattle men of the United States have passed through a 
like experience; in the early eighties first class stock cattle 
on the ranges were worth $20 to $26 all round, and every- 
body was raising them; in the early nineties the same class 
of cattle were only worth $5 to $8 all round, and every- 
body quit raisin.' them; to-day they are again worth $20 to 
$25 and may probably go higher. In the periods of de- 
pression you sold your fat cows, spayed jour heifeis, and 
only stayed in the cattle business because you could not get 
out of it. But in the past four or five years the admitted 
scarcity on tbe one hand and the improved character of 



the stock on the other, have made you rich beyond degree. 

The horse business of to-day is where the cattle business 
was six years ago. What may we not accomplish if we will 
but heed the lessons that have been taught by the mistakes 
of the past,when too often unsound and ill shaped stallions and 
mares were bred because unfit for use or sale, and a legacy of 
decrepitude and general usefulness was a legitimate inherit- 
ance of their progery. In contra distinction to those 
metheds let us choose tbe very best individual animals from 
the most prepotent trotting families, and breed for size, style, 
substance, soundness, beauty, kindness and tbe ability to trot 
fast and stay the distance, force the survival of the fittest by 
the most seaiching classification and selection, aiming to 
perpetuate no animal that is not a credit to its breeder and 
tbe family from which it descends. But remember, however, 
that while blood is a very important factor in producing a 
valuable, useful and salable horse, food is even more so. It 
is worse than useless to attempt to breed unless you intend 
abundantly to feed up. See how large and strong and fine 
yon can make your colts at a given age by furnishing such 
an abundance of pasturage and feed as to always keep the 
baby fat on the colt in all stages of his development. 

I reiterate that now is the time to breed. You can in- 
crease jour cotton crop, your corn crop, your wheat crop, 
and even your hog crop in a single season, to meet a special 
demand, but it will take six years to materially increase 
your horse crop and get the goods ready for market. Take 
time by tbe forelock, and by more intelligent breeding, better 
methods of care, feed and handling, produce what all the 
rich horsey world wants, the horse of tbe century, tbe best 
type of the American standard bred trotter, and the horse 
breeder's note will then be as good as the cattleman's note 
now is. 

Horses for the British Army. 

When the war broke out between Great Britain and the 
Boers, we heard not a little about the arrangements the 
power first named has with its great urban transportation 
companies with relation to tbe impressing of horses in the 
time of need by the nation and when the government began 
to enforce its powers, the companies at once sent large orders 
for more horses to this couotiy. Tbe demand thus engen. 
dered, caused the export trade to be heavier during the laet 
three months of 1899 than it ever had been since American 
horses were taken in any numbers across the seas, and tbe 
augmentation in price was very satisfactory. From tbe most 
reliable sources we learn that tbe British government has up 
to two weeks ago, taken 2000 well seasoned horses from one 
London transportation company alone and we are further 
told that it has intimated to this and other similar companies 
that it wilt require many thousand more head during the 
next few months. This is due to the fact that the British 
authorities have determined to fight the Boers in their own 
way, and by placing a correspondingly large force of cavalry 
and artillery in the field, be able to keep pace with the active 
warriors of the Transvaal. Just how many more horses 
there will be required to adequately horse the British regi- 
ments, now at the seat of war and to be sent there, is not 
stated. It would seem, though, that as many at least as 
10,000 horees will be required from this country alone to fill 
this particular item in tbe great general demand from foreign 
sources. Our correspondent at National Stock Yards, Illi- 
nois, market last week pointed out that there bad developed 
there a demand among the English exporters for a strong 
horse of the medium cavalry type, that in its classification 
comes in as a "top southerner." For this sort of a horse 
the buyers were willing to pay last week from 60 to 85 
dollars and as that was about $10 more per head than the 
southern dealers had before been willing to pay, the prices 
of southerners rose to that amount practically all along the 
line. We can well afford to lose thousands of these horses — 
which are termed in the Chicago market, medium drivers — 
but the supply will not hold out indefinitely and if the South 
keeps on asking for so many horses as she has for the past 
four weeks or thereby, the market for these binds will aoon 
be one of tbe most active. In England the war has sent tbe 
values of horees skyward and those who bad any number to 
Bell, lo matter what kind of grade, have been making money 
fast. Irish horses that will make good troopers or artillery 
nags could be bought for 30 pounds and the same horse now 
readily brings 50, so that the rise is truly a phenomenal out 
and easily explains how the buyers here can afiord to pay 
such good figures as they have been paying of late. It 
seems, too, that Germany is about to resort to tbe American 
markets for some cavalry horses, a circular recently issued 
by the war office in that empire having stated that if the 
breeders at home cannot or will not produce a sufficient 
supply, recourse mint be had to these markets where there is 
never any trouble in getting enough for immediate needs. 
It is needless to say that this piece of information was but 
ill received in Germany. The people of which country 
seem to think that any thing American which comes in 
competition with their home grown product, ought to be 
arbitrarily barred as something that operates against the 
public good, — The Horseman. 

A handsome .Percheron stallion is advertised for sale in 
this isBue. Now that there is a good demand for heavy 
horses a Percheron stallion ean earn a large sum if properly 
managed and properly located. 



February 3, 1900j 



73 




Striped Bass Olub. 



The 8an Francisco 8triped Bass Club has issued in printed 
form its rules and events for 1900. The season is made to 
extend from January 1st to December 1st. All legal holi- 
days during that period are to be official competition days. 
Various prizes are offered for the members who catch the 
most fish, largest fish, etc., during the year. 

It is provided in the ruies than no fish weighing less than 
three pounds shall count for a record. All record fish are 
required to be weighed in the presence of one or more 
members other than the fortunate anglers. During the 
season there are to be four official outing days, the dates of 
which will be hereafter determined. On each of these days 
a suitable prize will be awarded to tbe member catching the 
largest fish. 

The 8triped Bass Club was organized last year and has 
proved to be a great success. The membership is limited to 
twenty-five and is now full. The officers elected for this 
year are: President; Charles F. Breidenstein; Vice-President, 
James Watt; Secretary, James 8. Turner; Treasurer, Charles 
H. Kewell; Executive Committee — George A. Wentwortb, 
George M. Mitchell, 8idney Hall, Frank E. Daverbosen and 
William 8. Turner. The members other than the officers 
are the following: Joseph Dober, Terrence Evans, 8amuel 
Heller, R. C. Hornung, Charles Huvck, John J. Kennedy, 
Henry Ennz, Andrew Legaspe, J. E. Lower, James Lynch, 
Clarence Maynard, Nat E. Mead, Frank Moody, D. E. 
Morris, Bert Spiing, George Walther. 



When a sportsman shoots a fine specimen of a game ani- 
mal, one of his first thoughts is to preserve it so that be may 
have some token of his prowess to show his friends. In this 
respect the angler is at a disadvantage, and his stories of big 
fish, as a rule, have to be backed bv photographs or other 
evidence more or less susceptible of bias. (Even in this 
there is a way of joggling returns ) A Chicago angler 
has hit upon a way for preserving his trophies that 
is artistic and has the additional merit of being very 
easily done. He splits the fish, and skins one-half, 
which he treats with a coating of salt, and mounts in 
profile on a sheet of birch bark. Tbe bark, with the skin 
attached, may be rolled for convenience in carrying. When 
civilization is reached the vivid coloring of the specimen is 
restored by a coat of varnish, and a very good eye is made 
from a piece of birch bark on which a black iris has been 
marked with ink. 

Steelhead anglers have about concluded to put awav their 
tackle for this season and await the first day of April and 
the bringing out of the light fly-rod for brook trout. 



Edg. Forster and his son, a lad of a dozen summers' expe- 
rience, shot at Reclamation on Sunday. The boy used a 22 
caliber rifle and was successful in bagging several canvasbacks. 

A new trap shooter made his advent in this city last week. 
Otto Feudner has the youugster in charge (he weighs at pres- 
ent about fourteen pounds) and promises to start him on blue 
rocks at an earlv age. Will Golcher says he will ha»e to go 
throngh the "cigarette course" before he tackles targets. 

English snipe and a remarkably large bag, too, fell to two 
guns in Marin county 8undav. John E. Orr and Howard 
Black were the shooters and the Country Club preserve was 
the locality. Supervisor Black's hnndsome and stylish Irish 
setter bitch was kept very busy but did her work in a willing 
and happy manner. 

Ed Schullz who has recently received a new high grade 
L. C. Smith gun from Tbe Hunter-Arms Co. tested the gun 
on the Lincoln Gun Club grounds this week. On pattern 
trials the results were satisfactory to a remarkable degree. 
Out of ninety blue rocks shot at he scored eighty-four, an 
average of over 93 per cent. 

The waning days of the duck shooting season are beginning 
to show a lottery development that is at times exasperating 
to the hunter. As a rula good bags and a fair amount of 
sport have fallen to the lot of most sportsmen who have gone 
to tbe ducking grounds recently, but others have drawn 
blanks in the midst of plenty, much to their chagrin. 

Teal have been unusually scarce this year, but few birds 
having been bagged in districts where usually they have been 
plentiful. Cinnamon teal, on the contrary, have appeared 
in larger proportion than heretofore, a number of perfect 
and beautiful specimens have been secured for mounting by 
different collectors. Last week a tew teal were noticed in 
8nisun bay and several small bags killed. 

Clarence A. Haight and James Maynard Jr. made a trip 
to Monterey last Saturday returning on Monday morning. 
"Pop'' Carr and Mayor Johnson made the outing very en- 
joyable for the visitors. On Sunday the quartette of sports- 
men hunted quail on the old field trial grounds about four 
miles from town. Birds were scarce, a threatening storm 
causing the quail to seek shelter in heavy cover. Haight's 
setter bitch Flash and Maynard's black pointer Thom worked 
together for tbe guns. In looking over the ground about 
Elkhorn slough, Jim Mavnard recognized many familiar 
landmarks of a favorite duck hunting resort of his a few 
years ago. 

The Fresno Tournament. 




CARTRIDGE AND SHELL. 



Canvasback ducks are still to be seen in immense flocks on 
Richardson's and San Pablo bays. 



George Franzen and Sol Sharp bagged fifty ducks; sprigs, 
spooneys and "cans," last Sunday at Alvarado. 



Jules Bruns and Peter McRae managed to bring down a 
sackful of ducks on the train from Sears Point last Sunday 
evening. 

Hunters who go to the Sonoma marshes these days find 
"cani" only, the other birds, excepting a few wiretails and 
bluebills, being non est for the present. 



Eleven guns were at work on tbe Alameda Gun Club pre- 
serve last Sunday. Fair average bags were made; China 
slough was the best shooting section for the club members. 



The local trap season will open on March 4th. Prior to 
this the Lincoln Gun Club will give a preliminary warm-up 
shoot at the Alameda grounds on Washington's Birthday. 



C. A. McNeill and T. F. Lewis took a shooting trip in a 
boat on the waters opposite Point Richmond last Saturday. 
In a three hours' shoot they bagged a large number of ducks, 
mostly bluebills and "cans." 



The Gabilan Kennels of Hollister have several very choice 
pointer puppies which are offered at a reasonable price; tbey 
•re Glenbeigh stock and come from the best hunting dogs in 
that section. The announcement appears in our advertising 
columns. 

Last Sunday the independent knights of the shot gun were 
out in force on tbe Marin and Sonoma shores and marshes, 
The usual army of shooters paid their devotions to tbe quack- 
era frequenting tbe east bay shore marshes and sloughs from 
the Oakland estuary to Alviso. 



Event 5—15 targets, Championship of Arizona. Medal 
and 3 monevs : 

^ A li.^S n J. 4, c » rl,,,e t*i Weber 13, Hart It. Graham 12. "Smith" 12, Orn- 
dor<T12. Mc\ elgh 11. Mey. r II, Holme* 11. Hawkins 11. McCurdyll, 
Lanham II, Purcell 10, Haywood », Wilding 8, McMullen 7. 

Event 6—25 targets, handicap, 4 moneys: 
Graham 22, Jones 22, "-Tnlth" 21, Meyer 21. nolmes2I, McMullen 21, 
Altken 20, Harwood 20, Orndorfl 19. Weher 17. McVeigh 14. Harl 14, Mc- 
Curdy 14 Hawkins 14, Wilding 13, Purcell IS, Lanham 12, Carlisle 10, 
Cocoran 8. 

Event 7 — 15 targets, 4 moneys: 

Weher 14, .Hart 13. Altken U, McVeigh 10, Wilding 10, Carlisle 10, Mc- 
C urdy 19. Graham 8, Lanham 6, "Smith" », Purcell 9, Holmes 9, Hawkins 
9, Jones 9. 

Event 8—10 targets, 4 moneys: 

Graham 9. Jones 9. McVeigh 8, Weher 8, Hart8, Altken 8, Hawkins 8, 
Wilding 7, Holmes 7. Carlisle 7, McCurdy 6, "Smith" 5. Purcell R. Lan- 
ham 4. 

Event 9—20 targets, 4 moneys: 

Holmes 20. Hawkins 17, Jones 17, Lanham 17, Weher 18. Hart 15. 
"Smith" 14, Wilding 14, McCurdy 13, Graham 12, Purcell 9, Altken 10. 

Event 10—15 targets, 4 moneys: 

Hawkins 13, Graham 12. Jones 13, "Smith" U, Weber 10, Hart 10, Pur- 
cell 10, Altken 10, Holmes 9, McCurdy 5. 

Event 11 — 15 targets, 4 moneys: 

Holmes 12. Hart II. Hawkins II, McVeigh 10, Weber 10, Jones 10, Pur- 
cell 9, McMullln9, Lanham 9. Altken 9, Jells 8, Graham 7, McCurdy 7, 
Carlisle 6, McAuley 6, Cooper 6, McGIll 5. 

Two man medal team race, 25 singles: 

Altken 17, Graham 23, total 40: McVeigh 20, Purcell 19 total 39- 
Holmes 24, Carlisle 15, total 39: Weber 19, Wilding !5. total 34; Jones 15, 
Hawkins 19, total 34; Lanham 10, McCurdy 17, total 33: Hart 13, McGIll 
11, total 24. 

Four man team race, 30 single*. 10 pairs: 

Tucson Team— Weber 39, Purcell 32. McVeigh 30. Hart 41—142. 
Sheonls Team— Holmes 41. Altken 85, Graham 25, Carlisle 30-131. 
.lerome Team-Hawkins 27, McCurdy 38, Lanham 36. Jones 84—130. 
8. P. Team— Jelfs 18, McAuley 17, McGIll 26, McMullln 35—95. 

High average on blue rocks: 

Nan m fin 93 19-37, Weber 81 3-37, Holmes 79 17-37, Hawkins 74 22-87, 
Altken 72 36-37, Hart 71 33-37, Graham 69 7-37, Purcell 64 12-37. 

Event 1 — 15 live birds, championship of Arizona medal : 

Holmes 15, McVeigh 13, Graham 13. Weber 12, Hart 11. Altken 11, 
Purcell 11, Hawkins 11, Wilding 9, Orndorfl 9, Lanham 8, Carlisle 8, 
Pease 6. 

Event 2—10 live birds, 3 moneys: 

Holmes 10. Altken 9. Graham 9. Orndorfl 9, McVeigh 8, " Smith " 8, 
Wilding 8, Weber 8, Hart 8, Cocoran 8, Purcell 7, HawkliiB 7, Lanham 

6, " Bert " 6, Jones (!, Carlisle 6. 

Event 3 — 7 live birds, bigh guns : 

McVeigh 7, Hart 7, '• Smith " 6. Weber 6, Holmes «, Graham 6, Hawk- 
Ins 6, Wilding 5, Purcell 5, Cocoran 5, Altken 3. 

Event 4—12 live birds, McVeigh Handicap Medal : 

Graham 11, McCurdyll, Hart 11, Holmes 11, McVeigh 10, Altken 10, 
Jones 10, Wilding 9, Weber 9, Lanham 9, Purcell 7, Hawkins 7, Carlisle 

7, Cooper 7, Pease 6. 

The Game Law. 



The Board of Governors of the California Inanimate Tar- 
get Association held its annual meeting Monday evening a^ 
the Olympic Gun Club rooms. Tbe gun dub representative g 
present were as follows: Antiocb.Dr. W. 8. George, President 
Empire Gun Club, Messrs. La Motte and J. B. Ha tier; Fresno 
Club, Messrs. St. John, Judy and R. M. Thompson; Garden 
City Gun Club, George Anderson, Chick Lion and Dr. A. 
M. Barker; Lincoln Gun Club, I. R. D. Grubb; Merced Gun 
Club, Mr. 8t. John; Olympic Gun Club, M. C. Allen, L. D. 
Owens and W. D. McArthur; San Francisco Gun Club, J. 
J. Sweeney: Union Gun Club, Thomas L. Lewis. The clubs 
that failed to send representatives were Stockton and 
Porterville. 

The annual blue-rock tournament this year will be held at 
Fresno on Sunday and Monday, April 29ih and 30th. Fresno 
sportsmen piesent promised at least sixty entries from that 
city and adjicent towns. 

Five races each day at twenty-five single birds will consti- 
tute tbe regular program, a tropby or other suitable prize 
will be the principal reward to the winner in each race. 
Money divisions will also be alloted to those in second and 
following positions in the scores. The money distribution 
will be the same as last year. 

So called professional shooters and trade representatives 
will not be barred from prize or money competition this 
year. This is a move that will meet tbe approbation of 
most of the shooters who intend to be present. 

Tbe individual championship medal this year will go to 
the shooter who makes the highest average score in all 
the events. 

All clubs that desire to become members of the association 
must make application to Secretary Gunzendorfer at Mon- 
terey not later than April 20tb, each club shall also send a 
list of its members to the secretary not later thin April 21st. 

Arizona Trap Shootere. 



A three days' trap shooting tournament at live birds and 
blue rocks was held at Tucson, commencing on Sunday, Jan- 
uary 21st. The participants were composed of Tucson talent 
and shooters from nearby points. Clarence Nauman super- 
intended the affair. He shot throughout tbe matches for 
birds only, makicg the highest average on blue rocks, 
93 19 37. Messrs. Weber and Carlisle were the winners of 
the blue rock championship medals. Messrs. Aitken and 
Graham won the two man team medal, the medal for the 
four man team was captured by Messrs. Weber, McVeigh, 
Purcell and Harl. Holmes won tbe live bird championship 
medal and Graham won the McVeigh medal, after shooting 
off the ties. 

A summary of tbe scores is the following: 

Event 1 — 20 targets, handicap, 4 monevs : 

Weber 19, Dr. Purcell 19, "Bmlth" 18. L. A. Hawkins 18, Haywood 16, 
A lik n 16, Cocoran 15. Holmes 15. Carlisle 16, MuCurdy 16, Wilding 14, 
Meyer 14, McMullen 14, McVeigh 18, Hart 13, Graham 11, F. M. Jones 11. 

Event 2—10 singles, field, 4 moneys : 

Cocoran 10, Altken 10, McVeigh 9. Carlisle 0. Welding t>, Weber 8, Hart 
8, Holmes 8, Graham 8, "Smith" 7, Meyer 7, McMullen 7, Hawkins 6, 
Haywood », Purcell 3. 

Event 3 — 25 targets, handicap. Blue Rock Championship 
of Arizona. Medal and 3 moneys: 

Weber 22. Holmes 21, Hawkins 21, McMullen 21, FTacwood 20. Jones 20, 
Welding 19, Purcell 19. "Smith.'* 18, Meyer 18. Harl 17, Altken 17, Lan- 
ham 17 Graham 17, McCurdy 17, McVeigh l6,Orndorff in. 
*Blrda only. 

Event 4—15 targets, handicap, 4 moneys. 

Haywood 16, Holmes 14. Weber 13, Meyer II, Purcell 13, "Smith" 11, 
Hart 11, Altken 11, Hawkins 11, Welding 10. OrndorfTlO, Carlisle 10, Mc- 
Veigh 9, McCurdy 9, Jones 9, Lanham 9, McMullen 9, Graham 8, Cor- 
coran S, Angus 6. 



The synopsis of the game laws appearing below and pub- 
lished in the Breeder and Sportsman for several years 
past has, from time to time been changed or the provisions 
of new ordinances added thereto by reason of the many and 
various changes in the county game and fish laws, particu 
larly those of recent date and of application in and around 
the bay counties. 

This synopsis has been frequently copied (in more or less 
garbled and incomplete form) and quoted by city and interior 
ournals and has also been printed and distributed by busi- 
ness houses. While the information given at the date of is- 
suance was substantially correct, we do not care to be held 
responsible for the circulation of old matter that is now in- 
correct in many details. Home complaint has been made in 
this respect and to avoid misunderstanding in the future it is 
suggested that for information of this character a reference 
be made to current numbers of the Brreder and 8ports 
man for the latest and most complete data concerning the 
Game Laws. 

The county enactments relative to the shipment of game 
have become inoperative under the decision of the Supreme 
Court of California, rendered December 5, 1899, in the case 
of James Knapp on habeas corpus, appealed from the 
Superior Court of Stanislaus county. 

The open season for shooting quail, doves, deer and wild duck as 
fixed oy the State law Is as follows: Doves, 15th July to 16th Febru- 
ary. Mountain quail and grouse, 1st September to 16th February. 
Valley quail, wild duck and rait, lit October to 1st March. Male deer, 
15th July to 15th October. Pheasants, the taking, killing, selling or 
haviDg In possession at any time is prohibited; robbing or destruc- 
tion of nests or having pheasant eggs in possession is a misdemeanor 
in the following couulies: Butte, Trinity, Marin, Lake, Merced- 
Riverside, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, Kings, Ven, 
tura, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Joaquin, Yuba. 

The clerks of nearly all the Boards of Supervisors have advised us 
no changes have been made this year, but the ordinances passed 
last year hold good if they do not conflict with tho Slate law. The 
following counties nave not passed any ordinances that alter 
the open season as provided by State law : Amador. Butte, Inyo, 
Modoc. Mono, Mendocino, Mariposa, Nevada, Napa, Plumas, 
San Diego, Solano, Siskiyou, Tehama, and Yolo. 

The changes are as follows : 

Alpine— Deer. Sept. 2 to Oct. 16. 

Alameda— Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 1. Male deer. July 16 to Oct. 1. 
Pheasants protected until February. 1904. Hunting, killing or hav- 
ing in possession for purpose of sale or shipment out of county: 
quail, bob white, partridge, wild duck, rail, mountain quail, grouse, 
dove, does or deer, antelope, elk or mountain sheep prohibited. 

Colusa— Deer, Aug. 16 to Oct. 16. 

Calaveras— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 16. 

Contra Costa— Deer, July 20 to Sept. 2. (Use of dogs prohibited). 

El Dorado— Doves, July 20 to Feb. L Trout, June 1 to Dec. 1. 

Fresno— Valley quail, Nov. 1 to Jan. 31. Individual bag limited to 
25 quail per day. Mountain quail, Sept. 1 to Feb. 16. Doves, Aug. 15 
to Feb 15. Pheasants, bob white quail and prairie chickens, close 
season in for e for an indefinite period. Use of nets or seines in 
couuty waiersfprohlblted. Shipment of game from county prohibited. 

Glenn— Deer, venison, dried venison, deer skin, buck, doe or fawn; 
quail, grouse, pheasant, dove, plover, snipe or wild duck, shipping or 
taking out of the county prohibited 25 birds per year individual 
limit to be taken from tho county upon licensed permission. 

Humboldt— Grouse and Wilson snipe, Sept. 1 to FeD. 16. Killing of 
waterfowl prohibited between one-naif hour after sunset and one 
halt hoar before sunrise. Pheasants and wild turkeys protected 
un-.llOct. 1, 1900. Black brant, Oct. 1 to March 1 . Shipment of game 
out of the county prohibited. Deer, use of dogs prohibited. Striped 
bass— Close leason until Jan. 1, 1906 

Kern— Shipping game out of the county prohibited. Quail, Oct. 1 
to Feb. L Bronze Ibis or curlew— Robbing or destroying nests or 
taking eggs, prohibited. 

Kings— Doves, Sept. 1 to Feb. 16. Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 16. 

Lake— Deer, Aug. 1 to Oct. L 

Los Angeles— Male deer, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. Valley quail, bob 
white or mountain quail, Dec. 1 to Jan. 1. Doves, July 16 to Oct. 1. 
Shooting for sale, or shipment of quail, bob white, partridges, pheas- 
ants, grouse, doves, ducks, rails or other game protected by statute, 
prohibited. Ducks, individual bag limited to 26 birds per day. 
Shipping game to markets outside of the county prohibited. Sea- 
gulls, egrets, pelicans, seals, protected. Trout season opens April 1 st. 

Marin— Deer, July 16 to Sept. 16. Quail, partridge or grouse, Oct. 15 
toJan.15 Individual bag limited to 25 birds per day. Market hunting 
and sblpment of game from the county Is prohibited. Use ot 
Repeating shot gun* prohibited. Killing of meadow larks or 
any other song birds prohibited. Hunting within private enclosures 
or on public roads prohibited. Trout, with book and line only, Aprl l 
to Oct. 16. 



14 



February 3, 1900 



Madera— Market hunting prohibited. 

Monterey— Deer, July 15th to Sept. 1st. (Use of dogs prohibited). 
Quail. Oct. 1 to Feb. 1. Shipping or taking game out of the county 
prohibited. 

Napa— Trout, by hook and line ouly, April 1 to Dec. 1. 

Orange— Doves, Aug. l to Feb. L Deer, Aug. la to Oct. 1. (Market 
hunting prohibited). Quail, partridges or grouse, Oct. 1 to Oct. 5. 
Ducks, Nov. 1 to March L Ducks and quail, shipment from the 
county restricted as follows: No person snail ship ducks or quail 
out of the county in quantities to exceed two dozen birds a week. 
Market hunting prohibited, 
a Placer— Trout, tune 1 to Dec. 1. 

Plumas— Salmon, trout. May 1 to Dec. 1 (netting prohibited.) 

Riverside— Male deer, ciose seasou until July 15, 1901. July 15 to 
Sept. 15, thereafter. Quail, Individual bag limited to 20 biids per 
day. Mountain or valley quail, pheasant and wild duck, sale of pro- 
hibited in the county. Wild duck, valley or mountain quail, ship- 
ment from county prohibited. Trout, any variety, close season until 
May 1, 1901. May 1 to Dec. 1, thereafter. 

Sacramento -Quail, ducks, doves, pheasants; shooting for Bale and 
market out of county prohibited. Taking or shipping out of county 
of more than ten birds in one day by any person prohibited 

San Benito— Deer, Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. Market bunting and ship- 
ment of game out of county prohibited Quail, partridge or grouse, 
Oct. 15 to Feb. L Individual bag limited to 30 birds per day. 
Mountain quail, perpetual close season. Trout, April 1 to Oct. 15. " 

San Bernardino— Deer, July 15 to Sept 15;(close Beason continuous, 
1899.) Valley or mountain quail, wild duck, sale of and shipment 
out of county prohibited. Trout, catching or sale of, betweeu April 
1st and May 1st of any year and during 1899, prohibited. Tree 
squirrels, five per day the Individual limit. 

San Diego— Shipping game out of the county prohibited. 

San Joaquin— Shipping or taking game oat of the county pro- 
hibited. Shooting on public road prohibited. 

San Luis Obispo— Deer, July 15 to Sept. L Use of hounds prohib- 
ited. Doves, July 16 to Dec. 1. Hunting for markets situated outside 
of the county prohibited. Clams, use of plows or machines in digging 
prohibited. Shipment of abalones out of the county prohibited. 

San Mateo— Deer, Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. (UBe of dogs not prohibited. 
Market hunting prohibited). Rail, Oct. 15 to Nov. 1. (Shooting from 
boat at high tide prohibited). Quail, Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. 

Santa Barbara— Deer, Aug. 1 to Aug. 22. Use of hounds pro- 
hibited. Quail. Nov. 1 to March L Doves, Aug. 15 to Feb. 15. 
Market hunting and sale of game in the county prohibited. Lobsters 
or crawfish, close season, April 15 to Aug. 15, shipping from county 
in close season prohibited. Abalones, taking, selling, having in 

ssession and shipping from the county prohibited. Clams can not 
dug till July. 1902 

Santa Clara— Male deer, July 15 to Oct. 15. Valley or mountain 
quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 1. Individual bag limited to 20 birds per day, 
Quail, pheasants and doves, purchase and sale, or shipment out of, 
or into the county prohibited. Mild duck, purchase aud sale, or 
shipment out of county of ducks killed in the county prohibited. (In 
force Nov 9). 

Santa Cruz— Shipping game from the county prohibited 
Shasta— Deer, July 15 to Sept. 1. Shipment of feathered game out 
of the county prohibited. 
Sierra— Deer. Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Siskiyou— Shipment of feathered game out of the county prohibited. 

Sonoma— Deer. July 15 to Oct. 1. Quail, Nov. 1. to Feb. 1 Pheas- 
ants, close season till Jan. 1, 1904. Shipping game out of the county, 
hunting within private enclosures, prohibited. Use of nets in Btreams 
ot the county prohibited. 

Stanislaus— Wild ducks, dove, quail or snipe, shipment from the 
county prohibited. 

Sutter— Deer, dept. 1 to Oct. 15. Doves, July 15 to Jan. L. 

Trinity— Deer, Sept. 1 to Oct. 15. 

Tulare— Deer, 8ept. 1 to Oct. 15. Shipping game out of the county 
prohibited. 

V«nnirft_Quail. any varisty, Oct 1 to Nov. 1. Hunting for sale 
or market of quail, grouse, dove, wild duck, deer or mountain sheep 
prohibited, except between Oct. 10th and 15th. 

Yuba— Shipping ducks and quail from the county to market pro- 
hibited. 




Coming Events. 



BENCH SHOWS. 

Feb. 20— 2S— Westminster Kennel Club. 24th annual show. New 
York. James Mortimer, sup't. 

FIELD TRIALS. 

Kentucky Field Trial Association. Inaugural trials 

Ky. H. D. Newcomb. sec'y. 

South Carolina Game Protective and Field Trial Associa- 
tion. Inaugujal trials B. C. W. G. Jeffords, sec'y. 

Jan. 22. 1900— United States Field Trials Club. West Point, Miss. 
W. B Stafford, sec'y. 

Champion Field Trials Association's annual trials. Wes 

Point, Miss. (Following U. 8. Trials). W. B. Stafford, sec'y. 

Jan 22, 1900— Pacific Coast Field Trials. 17lh annual trials 
Bakersfleld. J. K. de Ruvter, sec'y. 

Feb. 5, 1900 -Alabama Field Trials Club. 4th annual trials. Green- 
ville. T. H. Spencer, sec'y. 

Feb. — , 19iO-Texas field Trial Club. 4lh annual trials. 

Tex, G. A. Chabot, sec'y-treas. 



Pacific Coast Field Trials. 



The All-Age Stake of the Pacific Coast Field Trials Club 
for 1900 was started on Wednesday morning of last week 
and finished the following day. AmoDg the sportsmen pres- 
ent from 8&n Francisco we note: Andrew Jackson, Frank 
Maskey, A. M. Kilgarif, W. E. Chute, Howard Black, A. B- 
Truman, H. J. Payne and S. F. Hughes, also C. N. Post and 
J. E. Terry of Sacramento; J. H. Schumacher, Fish and 
Game Commissioner Henry T. Keller and Kred Holbrook of 
Lob Angeles, W. W. Van Aredale of Siskiyou; W. 8. Tevis 
of Bakersfleld, T. J. Tiedeman of Portland, Or., F. R. Atkins 
of Seattle, and Dr. E. E. Wilson of Reno, Nev. The profes- 
sional handlers in attendance were R. M. Dodge, J. E. Lucas, 
W. B. Coutts, Fred Coutts, H. 8. Betten, H. L. Peach and 
Thos. Howe of Oregon. 

Peachmark, the winner of the All-Aged 8take, is a lemon 
and white English setter bitch, whelped July 13, 1894. She 
is by Mercury out of Betsy Mark and was bred by R. K. 
Gardner who sold her to E. V. Sullivan during the field 
trials of 1898. Her present owner, Mr. W. W. Van Arsdale 
of Siskiyou, Cal., purchased her when the Metilo Park Ken- 
nels were discontinued. Peachmark hss an f nviable field 
trial record, winning third place in the Derby for 1896 and 
first in the All-Age Stakes 1896, 1897 and 1898. She wa s 
not entered in last year's trials. Her performance in (his 
year's trials was of a very even and consistent character, 
showing strong bird sense and excellent training. 

Stockdale Kennels' liver and white pointer dog Cuba of 
Kenwood (Glenbeigh Jr. — Dodge's Stella), the winner of 
second, besides a creditable bench record, was placed second 



'n the Derby and All-Age for 1898, third in the All-Age and 
second in the Champion Stake for 1899. He was whelped 
January 20. 1896, and bred by R M. Dodge. He is the sire 
of Cuba's Z p, one of the recent Derby winners. 

Stockdale Kennels also annexed third honors in the All- 
Age, Nellie Wilson, a liver and white pointer bitch by Plain 
Sam— Dolly Dee II., whelped January 20, 1896. She was 
bred by John R. Danielle of Cleveland, Ohio. 

THE ALL-AGE. 

The dogs were put down on ground Wednesday mom. 
ing, along and adjacent to the dry bed of the creek where 
the first day's Derby was held, birds were not as plentiful as 
were found on the preceding day near Stockdale. More 
birds were found in the heavy timber, this ground, however, 
prevented as good a showing of speed and ranging as would 
have been seen in a more open section. 

Gladstar-Lucerne P. — The first pair down were C. 
O'Neill's setter Gladstar, handled by Coutts, and W. W. Van 
Arsdale's pointer Lucerne P.. H. S. Peach handler. The 
dogs worked diagonally across the creek bottom until a few 
birds took to open ground where Lucerne made a neat point 
which was honored by Gladstar, who dropped to wing. The 
dogs being sent on both coming to a point a short distance 
away, the bird, however, evidently sprinted off. Gladstar, 
slightly in the lead, again came to a staunch point nicely 
backed by the pointer, but again the bird failed to flush. A 
return to the timber gave Gladstar a cbance to secure another 
point, Lucerne backing and the bird was flushed and killed 
by Coutts, both dogs being steady to wing atd shot. Glad- 
star a short distance ahead pointed again. After being down 
forty-five minutes the pair were ordered up. 

Cuba's Z?p- Peachmark — Stockdale Kennels' pointer 
Cuba's Z?p, handled by Dodge, and W. W. Van Arsdale's 
setter Peachmark, H. 8. Peach handler, were the next brace 
put down in open ground. This was an interesting heat; the 
first point was made by Peachmark in a bunch of willows, 
from which seversl birds were flushed by the handler. From 
this point the course was across the cpen fields where both 
dogs were good, fast workers and wide rangers. The next 
two points were claimed by the handlers at almost the same 
moment. Peachmark pointed in a buLch of willows and Z;p 
on the top of a little knoll in plain sight of the spectators. 
Both dogs were steady to wing. The next point was made 
by Peachmark in a ploughed field at the edge of a ditch down 
which the bird evidently ran, and was flushed by the handler 
some thirty feet away from the dog. This pair was ordered 
up at 9:45. 

Buck of Kent -Dick Stamboul — Yosemite Kennels' pointer 
Buck of Kent, John Lucas handler, and W. B. Coutt's pointer 
Dick Stamboul were next cast tff in an cpen fie!d to take off 
the "wire edge." Stamboul making a staunch point within 
a hucdred yards of the start, Buck continuing across the 
field, the handlers moving up caused the birds to run, when 
Stamboul became unsteady. A second point was made by 
him at the edge of a field across the creek bed. The dogs 
were ordered up at 10:40. 

Cuba of Kenwood-Tacoma — An interesting heat was run 
by Stockdale Kennels' pointer Cuba of Kenwood,; Dcdge 
handler, and C. B. Dwyer's setter Tacoma, bandied by Howe 
Neither dog had an opportunity to do the high class work 
that they were capable of. but one point being made in the 
heat which lasted one hour. An adjournment was then 
made for luncheon. 

King Don of Blithe-Nellie Wilson — After luncheon two 
pointers, Stockdale Kennels' Nellie Wilson, handled by 
Dodge, and Betten and Truman's King Don of Blithe, Henry 
Betten handler, were cast c fi in the most favorable ground 
worked over during the day. The course was over rolling 
bills, through short sage brush and cornfields; about half a 
mile distant a bevy of birds were flushed and scattered in 
short cover. Here King secured a point which was honored 
by Nellie Wilson. The second point was secured a short 
distance by Nellie, but in this case King did not honor the 
point, and flushed the bird. The next two points were 
secured by Nellie, but on the last of these she was unsteady, 
and her handler could not prevent her breaking in on the 
birds. 

Verona Cash — A. Decourtieux's setter Verona Cash, Lucas 
handler, that had drawn the bye, was then put down for half 
an hour, which ended the first series. 

SECOND SERIES. 

Peachmark-Gladstar — At 3:07 P. m. the pair were put 
d jwn just in the timber edge, very shortly Gladstar pointed 
a single bird in good style. Being ordered on again, be die" 
appeared, repeated whistling failing to bring him back. 
Peachmark was then ordered back to the wagon, and all the 
available horsemen started in search of the lost dog, but 
withou, result. It was almost an hour before Gladstar saw 
fit to return. On his coming back to the wagon the dogs 
were ordered on again, and, as if endeavoring to atone for 
his fault, Gladstar did some excellent work in the next few 
minutes, pointing several single birds. 

Dick Stamboul — Tacoma — This pair were the last put 
down. In this heat but few birds were found. Tacoma 
scored two points and Stamboul one. There were ordered 
up at 5:05, and the running closed for the day. 

On Thursday morning the heat of the previous evening 
between Gladstar and Peachmark, which tnrned out in an 
unsatisfactory way, owing to Gladstar's disappearance, was, 



at the sugg